How to Repack Wheel Bearings- 2009 Scamp 13' - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-03-2016, 07:23 AM   #43
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Name: Darral
Trailer: Scamp Standard 13' 2010
Tennessee
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One last piece of advice (for now), ask for "Seals" and not "Gaskets". Two different beasts even though Dexter throws in "gasket". A gasket as most of us know it is a flat piece made from different materials that is sandwiched in between usually two flat parts and bolted together. Example: The head on your tow engine bolting to the engine block- yep, called the 'head gasket'. Go figure.

Dont blame you for wanting to learn. THEN, later on if you have someone to do the work, you will at least know what to look for or the tell-tale signs should you feel like something is going wrong inside your drums whether it be brakes, bearings, etc. For me, there's simply one or two people I know around my area that I would even THINK about trusting to do this job! Do NOT take it to a Camping World- EVER (unless you personally know a mechanic there that would be working on it!)

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Originally Posted by fieldphoto View Post
Dave hit the nail on the head for me... while I am sure I may eventually get lazy enough to pay someone else to do this, I feel it is super important to understand how to do it myself. On the side of the road, cars wizzing by is NOT the place I want to be watching you tube videos and attempting this for the 1st time lol. Besides, I never would have figured out I actuslly have brakes!!

Off to work for me now... I will pick up the gaskets I forgot yesterday, and work on the project more this evening, more pics to come. Thanks all!
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Old 08-03-2016, 08:23 AM   #44
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Name: Ginny
Trailer: '09 Scamp 13' w/ Bath
Oklahoma
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Ok, since we have had to include brake maintenance into this wheel bearings conversation, I'll dig in off of Jack's comment.

While I have the wheel off and the brakes exposed, I can do a little light cleaning and inspection of the brakes. The question is, how, and how much?

I will post clear, bright pictures of the brakes this afternoon so we can all get a better look at them (last nights blur-fest doesn't help much!). To me, they look like a solid piece of rust lol, but I don't know how much of that is acceptable. I also don't know what to lubricate and what not to. I did find a good .pdf from Dexter that had some helpful info.
http://www.dexteraxle.com/i/u/614960...ric_Brakes.pdf
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Old 08-03-2016, 10:51 AM   #45
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Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
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How electric brakes work

With the drum removed you will notice an arm between the two brake shoes with a magnet attached. When you hit the brakes your controller supply's electricity to the magnet. The magnet grabs the rotating drum which causes the arm to move. This movement forces the brake shoes to spread and contact the drum.

If you push the arm to either side you will see how it works. To lubricate I use brake caliper grease. A little on the pivot points is all you need. Don't get any grease on the brake shoes or inside the drum. Buy a spray can of brake kleen in case you do. Raz
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Old 08-03-2016, 11:10 AM   #46
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Name: Wayne & Barbara
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Iowa
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After all is said and done - there's a lot more said than done.

Being "handy" is one thing, but being skilled is another.
Replacing and repacking bearings is a messy job, and if not done right can lead to more trouble. Go to a reputable trailer shop, and let them do it.
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Old 08-03-2016, 11:12 AM   #47
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Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
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For someone repacking bearings these are your best friend.

Nitrile Gloves. Regular latex wont hold up to chemicals. These thin gloves come in different sizes, textures and even colors. And not too hard to find. Especially important for those sensitive to dirty nails. If doing particular nasty jobs double up on them. Makes it easy to peel off a really nasty glove and still have your hands protected. Like the phone rings while your deep into the mess.

Grease Monkey Nitrile Large Disposable Gloves (100-Count)-23890 - The Home Depot
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Old 08-03-2016, 11:19 AM   #48
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Name: bob
Trailer: 1984 u-haul ct13; 1996 Casita 17 Spirit Deluxe; 1946 Modernistic teardrop
New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Collins View Post
After all is said and done - there's a lot more said than done.

Being "handy" is one thing, but being skilled is another.
Replacing and repacking bearings is a messy job, and if not done right can lead to more trouble. Go to a reputable trailer shop, and let them do it.
I agree, some jobs should not be attempted if you have no knowledge of how to do it or what to look for. Best way to learn is to have someone that knows how, there with you. I've seen many times where the advice is good, but misunderstood by the recipient.
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Old 08-03-2016, 11:56 AM   #49
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Name: Carol
Trailer: 22' Airstream Formerly 16' Scamp
British Columbia
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I will post clear, bright pictures of the brakes this afternoon so we can all get a better look at them (last nights blur-fest doesn't help much!). To me, they look like a solid piece of rust lol, but I don't know how much of that is acceptable.]
A lot will depend on the age of the trailer as to how much rust is to much. On a newish trailer (less than 10 years old) it may simple be surface rust that needs cleaning up off the brake parts and hubs. On an older trailer that has not had much done to it to in regards to brake and wheels over the years or has been pulled in the winter months in places that salted the roads, it could be more than that.

When I first took a good look at the brakes and hubs on my then new to me 16 year old trailer it was pretty clear due to the amount of rust on the brake springs and other parts and the hub itself that the brakes had not been set up or working correctly for a LONG time. A lot of rust & pitting on the brake assembly - springs magnets etc so I decided to just replace with a whole new brake assembly rather than just cleaning them up and doing an on the road experiment as to how long before something failed due to excessive rust.

It did not cost all that much to do - about $25 per side for the whole new brake assembly (including new pads). Some might have argued they could have been just cleaned up as the pads appeared to still have lots of wear on them (due to lack of use) but when it comes to safety items I feel there are some things just not worth messing with if they are relatively inexpensive to replace.

I also took the hubs themselves into a local shop as they where also seriously rusted and had a scoring marks on them as well - which was funny as the brakes clearly did not look like they had made much contact with the hub in a long time. They polished up the hubs and they looked nice and shiny and new for about $20 per hub. The up side of having the pros look at the hubs was they were able to confirm to me that none of the score marks on the hubs where bad enough to warrant the purchase of new hubs. They were able to polish them out. For me the benefit of starting out clean was it made it easier to spot any new issue that may be developing when the inspection was done each year.

One of the other benefits of pulling off the wheels and doing a bearing inspection each year is you also get to take a good look at the state of your brake pads and magnet. Depending on how many miles you pull the trailer in a year its not uncommon for the brakes to need adjusting. If your having to set your brake controller fairly high in order to get them to grab thats a sign they need adjusting. Another clue they need adjusting is if the hub is covered in rust with little to no sign the brakes or magnets have made much if any contact.
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Old 08-03-2016, 02:18 PM   #50
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Trailer: Compact Junior
Michigan
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When i bought my Compact Jr......

which is about 40 years old, I pulled the hubs and brought them to a nice nearby shop that specializes in horse trailer sales and service.

since I brought in the hubs they only charged about $20 to inspect and repack the bearings. it's considerably more expensive if they have to jack up the trailer and remove them.

easy on the wallet and gives me peace of mind.

on my boat trailer I would look more often. but now I have a tilt trailer and can launch my boat with the hubs above the water.

I also pay AAA about $15 more per year for a gold card that covers road service for the trailer too.

And I also belong to Boat U.S. for their roadside coverage for boat trailers.

I've found youtube videos to be very helpful at times.

I have a confusing multiple filter water gizmo in my basement. since the filters are changed yearly I usually forget what's what. but the filter company has a nice video on the way to do it.

and a few years ago I had a failure on my outside water spigot.

The spigot maker had a nice video on how to replace the offending small pieces in the faucet.

where youtube videos have done a disservice is on my golf swing......

"too much analysis can lead to paralysis!"
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Old 08-03-2016, 04:36 PM   #51
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Those are EZ Lube covers. Buy a greese gun and just change the greese.
Go to u tube several videos on how they work.
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Old 08-03-2016, 07:07 PM   #52
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Name: Ginny
Trailer: '09 Scamp 13' w/ Bath
Oklahoma
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Ok, I have some better, clearer pictures of the brakes in daylight. Check them out in this album:
Google Photos


The magnet seems in good shape. Should I be able to pull the calipers out a bit and make the brakes move as if I were applying them? if so, they seem pretty stiff/locked up. Not sure if they should be that stiff normally. Basically I really can't get anything to really move but the little swing arm that the magnet sits on. This swings pretty freely.

Thoughts before I re-assemble the wheel on this side?
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Old 08-03-2016, 07:22 PM   #53
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Name: Joe
Trailer: 2013 EggCamper & 2011 Silverado Reg Cab 4x4
Ohio
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I mentioned this earlier - now after seeing the pictures of your axle, I feel I may want to bring it up again.

The Dexter website says that when lubing the EZ lube axle that you have, pump grease slowly into the zerk. Once clean grease comes back out the cap - its full.

So after a disassembly and packing the bearings - new grease should be pumped in the zerk until the axle then is completely full of grease - no air. That's how the Dexter manual says to do it, and its how I do mine.

Page 57 and 58

http://www.dexteraxle.com/i/u/614960...ice_Manual.pdf

The nice thing about this axle is you can jack up the RV in the winter and add grease as you spin the wheels - essentially replacing the old grease with new. Not saying that's as good as a repacking - but its a great feature, to give it a few more pumps before a trip to get fresh grease in the bearings (and old out the end).
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Old 08-03-2016, 07:29 PM   #54
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Name: Ginny
Trailer: '09 Scamp 13' w/ Bath
Oklahoma
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Excellent, thanks for the info!
I am sure this will stir a whole different debate, especially since there appears to be conflicting info even within Dexters provided info. The 'how to video' i posted from Dexter is EXACTLY the same axle that I have. Yet, in the video they do not do any sort of grease gun fill? They only apply liberally to certain areas, and otherwise leave space... as others have recommended. And yet, if you have an EZ-Lube Axle, according to Dexter, you're supposed to 'fill 'er up' (for lack of a better phrase).... so... which is it?

*steps back slowly* Let the debate begin!!

(after you all answer my brake question above! lol)
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Old 08-03-2016, 07:41 PM   #55
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Trailer: 1984 u-haul ct13; 1996 Casita 17 Spirit Deluxe; 1946 Modernistic teardrop
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Another thing to check is; can you turn the adjusters. Sometimes they will seize.
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Old 08-03-2016, 08:35 PM   #56
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Trailer: 2004 13 ft Scamp Custom Deluxe
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Do I need to call scamp to find out the axle manufacturer in order to get correct grease?

Floyd, no brakes.
nothing that new was likely to have had anything but Lithium based grease in it.
Your trailer came with lithium based grease and it is almost difficult to find anything else in use in the last couple of decades in this application.
I would stay away from pure synthetic. Use what ever good brand name you find that is labeled Lithium.
Here is what I like best... (cause it is a purdy blue)!

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