jack up axles - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-02-2019, 05:36 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 779
jack up axles

What do you use to jack up your axles when adjusting the brakes or taking off the wheels? Do you take the same device when on the road in anticipation of changing a flat tire? Some people like the Andersen Rapid Jack, some like the aluminum Blaylock drive on jack, some use a bottle jack, scissor jack or floor jack.

I have a 8K lbs (approximate fully loaded weight, I am adding a bit to be conservative) Big Foot 25RQ. I anticipate changing a tire in adverse conditions as well as maintenance of the suspension, tires and axle at home. What is the best to use, or what do you use?
__________________

Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 06:22 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Name: John & Gloria
Trailer: Bigfoot 21RB
Florida
Posts: 103
I use a bottle jack. I did carry one of those lift cams but stopped because I found it very unhandy to have to hook up the tow rig just to lift a wheel. If you have a flat you still have to crawl under to put it in place so you may as well take a jack with you. I also found that many times the ground conditions didn't suit the cam well and required numerous times in and out of the rig to see if it lifted and that I hadn't gone too far.
__________________

Travelin2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 06:38 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
trainman's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 2019 Oliver Elite II
Texas
Posts: 335
Just wondering about jacking on the axles, Casita says NO JACKING on the axle and jack on the trailer frame. Is this true of all travel trailers, or just Casita. I assume it's because the axles on the Casita's are light weight as probably most trailers of that size are.

trainman
trainman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 06:47 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Name: Jack L
Trailer: Sold the Bigfoot 17-Looking for a new one
Washington
Posts: 1,450
Devices like the Rapid Jack have 1 function. I prefer a bottle jack because it has lots of uses beyond lifting the trailer.
Jack L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 06:53 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 8,037
Registry
The rubber torsion axles on Casitas and many other smaller trailers have a hollow tube. It is more easily damaged by jacking operations, hence the warning.

The OPís Bigfoot has a leaf spring suspension with solid axles. Different animal.

I carry a scissors jack when I travel due to the low clearance on a Scamp 13 with a flat. I use a floor jack and jack stands at home.

For the Bigfoot Iím thinking a HD bottle jack on the road, and the same at home plus jack stands to rest on while working for safety.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 07:17 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
Posts: 1,616
Personally I think the admonition to not jack on the axle is to prevent someone from jacking in the center of the axle where the bending stress is the highest and the tube really is hollow.
The Dexter has a "torsion" bar ans rubber rods at the ends and the Flexi-Ride has the end full of rubber and an embedded rod filling the square tube. The tube is fairly thick and while it would not be a good practice to jack on it, I doubt it would be damaged if the jack goes across the entire bottom flat and had a board between the jack and the axle cross shaft.
Actually strictly speaking the axle is on the end of the trailing arm and would probably not be a good place to jack either and this could also be part of the admonition!
Be safe and jack on the frame, but with the older thinner frame tubes you can damage them too! A board between is still a good idea.
redbarron55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 09:42 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 779
Thanks everyone for responding.

Dexter Axle says don't jack on the axle or suspension points. Some frame mfg's say don't jack on the frame. Tire shops say they jack where the axle is attached to the suspension. Casita says jack on the frame, but it is a torflex suspension, so the axle wall thickness is thin.

On the Big Foot the frame is very high. I don't think it has a solid axle, although it does have a very thick wall. The axle does see a lot of action, such as pot holes, corduroy roads, etc., which leads one to believe putting a jack close to the tire should be acceptable. I will probably put the jack where my Dad always did, where the axle meets the suspension, hopefully between the U bolts, maybe on a thick board.

Scissor jacks don't work that well. I had a blowout on the Casita (single axle). Pulled over onto a fairly soft angled shoulder. Fully flat the scissor jack could not be extended, no matter how hard I tried. A guy stopped and loaned me his small bottle jack, which allowed me to raise the frame high enough to eventually get the scissor jack under and extended just enough to allow it to be screwed to the height needed to change the tire. So, after that, towing the Casita, I carry a small bottle jack, a 6 ton bottle jack and a large scissor jack. While this works OK with the Casita, I am concerned it may not be what is needed with a double axle BF, which weighs, loaded maybe 7K to 8k pounds.

Also during that repair of the blowout I was on the side of the road on a soft shoulder, on an angle. The smaller jack buried into the ground but raised the TT up just enough to get a second larger jack under it which then raised it up enough to get the scissor jack on a board up enough to change the tire. Many anxious moments during this effort. Prefer something a bit less problematic next time.

Someone said they use a floor jack, which they keep in the bed of their truck. So I checked floor jacks out on Amazon. A 1.5 ton floor jack weighs about 40+ pounds, a 2 ton weights about 60 lbs and a 3 ton floor jack weighs 80 up to 150 lbs. I would need a bumper crane just to get it out of the bed of the pickup.

I suspect a 1.5 aluminum floor jack, the lightest weight, is not strong enough to raise up one tire on the BF, but I could be wrong. Anything bigger is just that, big and heavy. I don't really want to use the Rapid jack or the Blaylock jack. So it looks like I just talked myself into a couple of hydraulic ram jacks, the 6 ton and maybe a smaller one. Sure like the idea of a small aluminum floor jack though, seems like it would be safer.
Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 10:03 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 8,037
Registry
Since you have tandem axles, if you get a flat in an awkward place, you can always pull it slowly to a better spot (if more than a short distance, air up the good tire to max, since I recall BF runs at less than full sidewall pressure). You can also run the good tire onto leveling blocks to get a head start on jacking. Tandems give you a few more options. I donít see why youíd need to carry more than one bottle jack sufficient to lift one side, 3-4T maybe?

BTW, you can do the same with a single axle trailer, too, in a pinch. Run the flat tire up on leveling blocks to create clearance for a jack.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 10:42 AM   #9
Member
 
Name: George
Trailer: 1997 16' Scamp
Michigan
Posts: 68
jacking a trailer

I've used both bottle and scissor jacks on the frame of my 16' Scamp. I always use a block of wood to spread the force over a greater area on the frame. When travelling I depend on my car scissor jack but have never had a need to use it in 5 yrs and maybe 30,000 miles of towing. Knock on wood!
varmint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 11:05 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: 2013Escape 21
Iowa
Posts: 458
I have four pieces of 2x 8 treated in the front box and and also a pair of Anderson levelers. I can and have slowly pulled the Escape , both the 19 and 21 up onto one or two high of the 2x8 s and the other tandem tire is then off the ground. Hooked up to the tow vehicle, in park and with the brake set I remove the tire and wheel for service, rotation or whatever. If it’s brake adjustment, I spin the tire and wheel and adjust as necessary.
Iowa Dave
Iowa Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 12:25 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Name: Wayne & Barbara
Trailer: Parkliner
Iowa
Posts: 992
It may be possible to place the jack under the swing arm (torsion axle) it then need just enough lift to get the tire off the ground. Be sure to chock both front and rear of the other wheel. That's as long as there is enough clearance in the wheel well. Best to be hitched to the TV, so the trailer doesn't shift on you.
Remember to loosen the lug nuts before raising the wheel. And do the final torquing after lowering to ground.
Wayne Collins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 02:30 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 779
Thanks everyone. I will certainly follow some of the advise given. Jacking up at home is one thing, quite another when out in the boonies without a cell phone connection, in the rain or snow, soft ground slanted roadway etc. Hopefully I will remember to find a better place to pull over now that I have a tandem.

It just never occurred to me to run the rim up on blocks to get the scissor jack situated. Gotta remember this bit for sure.
Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 03:05 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 8,037
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rzrbrn View Post
...It just never occurred to me to run the rim up on blocks to get the scissor jack situated. Gotta remember this bit for sure.
Me neither. Got a flat on my single axle utility trailer a couple of years ago. My tow vehicle only had a bottle-style jack, which wouldn't fit under the trailer anywhere. Fortunately my wife was nearby with a scissors jack that did fit.

Later I told the story to a friend, and he said, "Why didn't you just pull the flat tire onto a rock?" Duh!
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2019, 05:11 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Name: bob
Trailer: 1984 u-haul ct13; 1996 Casita 17 Spirit Deluxe; 1946 Modernistic teardrop
New York
Posts: 4,864
[QUOTE=Rzrbrn;734608]






Someone said they use a floor jack, which they keep in the bed of their truck. So I checked floor jacks out on Amazon. A 1.5 ton floor jack weighs about 40+ pounds, a 2 ton weights about 60 lbs and a 3 ton floor jack weighs 80 up to 150 lbs. I would need a bumper crane just to get it out of the bed of the pickup.


I have two professional quality floor jacks like you would find in any good auto repair shop. They are good jacks but heavy. I also have three of the small mini floor jacks that I bought at Sears. They are rated 2 1/4 tons and are only 22" long. One came in a plastic carry case. I use them a lot because they are small and easy to carry. They work good and have never had any problems. I bought a similar one for my son-in-law at Walmart so he could change tires. I was surprised at how good it worked. These are not jacks you would use on an everyday basis, but for occasional use they are OK. I have used one to pull the wheels on our Casita.
__________________

mary and bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
axle


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jack-E-Up jack Victor Benz Modifications, Alterations and Updates 12 07-20-2017 04:12 PM
Scissor Jack or leveling jack on Boler DrKyle1 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 27 12-09-2016 04:01 PM
Double Axles Legacy Posts Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 26 06-15-2003 01:37 PM
Learn more about Dexter axles Legacy Posts Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 1 11-11-2002 10:30 AM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.