Most Economical TV for 13 footer (Trillium) - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-24-2010, 09:14 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Donna D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Donna D
Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
Oregon
Posts: 24,433
Camella, yeah get brakes. It's a maintenance issue. It's FAR cheaper to replace trailer brakes than brakes on a tug. Your tow vehicle will go through brakes much faster towing than not towing. Save yourself some money and be safer too. Win-Win.
__________________

__________________
Donna D.
Ten Forward - 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Double Yolk - 1988 16' Scamp Deluxe
Donna D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2010, 09:15 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Tom U's Avatar
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: Fiber Stream 16 ft
California
Posts: 382
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
Camella, yeah get brakes. It's a maintenance issue. It's FAR cheaper to replace trailer brakes than brakes on a tug. Your tow vehicle will go through brakes much faster towing than not towing. Save yourself some money and be safer too. Win-Win.
Camella,

What she said!
__________________

__________________
Tom - '79 Fiber Stream

There is no such thing as an all black cat.
Tom U is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2010, 09:53 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Carol H's Avatar
 
Name: Carol
Trailer: 22' Airstream Formerly 16' Scamp
British Columbia
Posts: 11,731
Registry
Subara Outback has a tow cap of 2800 or 3000 depending on the model and it would handle your tailer just fine. But you need brakes over 1000lbs. A *large* storage area in the back - much larger than a lot of much bigger SUV's. Average about 19 mpg towing a 16' scamp over the *long* trips. On short flat trips it does a bit better in the 21 mpg range.
__________________
Carol H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2010, 03:16 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Michel, Bouchard's Avatar
 
Name: Michel
Trailer: Boler 1300 1973
Quebec
Posts: 114
Registry
Better than me, I just did a 3000 km trip around Gaspesia with an average of 13.4l/100km or with US gallon, 17.55mpg.

Someone I know just went from QC to BC and with his 1300 Boler and 2010 Dodge Caravan and he did in between 15 to 16 l/100km, which is around 15mpg.
__________________
Boler 1300 1973
Jeep Wrangler 2dr 2012
Michel, Bouchard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2010, 08:16 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Kip in Ga.'s Avatar
 
Name: Kip
Trailer: 2003 Casita 17' SD Deluxe, Towed by '09 Honda Ridgeline.
Georgia
Posts: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmella in Canada View Post
I am planning on tripping long term once I get the hang of things. I am looking at buying a TV for my Trillium 1300 and want the most efficient on gas mileage.....

....Basically I want the least amount of car/truck possible to do the job safely. I have been scanning the posts and see alot of people using smallish SUVs but I am not sure about the fuel economy with these. I suppose I should mention that my Trill doesn't have brakes. I don't really plan to get them as I am a very cautious driver. I am not very mechanically inclined so I will be asking alot of advice over the next while so I want to thank you all in advance.
Carmella,

A vehicle that gets good mileage in day to day driving is not necessarily going to get the best mileage when towing. Larger engines labor less than smaller ones. We camped for many years in days of yore and pretty much came to the conclusion that the trailer weight should not exceed any more than 3/4 the tow rating of the tow vehicle. Example: A trailer when, fully loaded, that weighs 1500 lbs should be pulled by a TV with a tow rating of at least 2000#.

It is amazing the amount of weight we add to a camper with "STUFF". Also a lot of campers advertised weight is for the basic. Add in AC,water, awning, leveling jacks, dishes clothing propane tanks, and so forth, and a 1200 # (advertised) camper can be more in the 1600-1700 range real quick. That would require a TV with a rating more in the 2200 lb range.

Our Ridgeline is rated to tow 5000#. But the owners manual states boldly that brakes must be on any trailer over 1000 pounds. This is for proper handling and safety as well as saving the tow vehicles brakes.

Makes no difference how careful you drive. Sooner or later Murphey's law will catch up and you will have to slam on your brakes. Without trailer brakes, the trailer can push you into whatever you were trying to avoid, and/or jack knife. Over the years I've had instances where all 4 tires on the TV and the trailer tires were all smoking from a panic stop which ended very close to whatever was in front of me. Without trailer brakes I would have plowed into it.

Driving in the Mountains can also cause real stress on brakes. If the TV is having to deal with the extra weight of a trailer, bad things can and will happen. It isn't a matter if IF! It is a matter of WHEN!

You also need enough engine to keep you at or near the speed limit. Going too slow up a steep grade can result in folks passing you in unsafe conditions. Same when trying to merge into traffic.

Automatic transmissions need to have auxilary coolers when towing much over 1000 lbs. If they don't have them they will eventually die prematurely.

Good luck and be safe!

Kip
__________________
Kip in Ga. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2010, 11:11 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Roy in TO's Avatar
 
Name: Roy
Trailer: 1972 boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500
Ontario
Posts: 4,954
Trailer brakes can also be manually controlled to help stop trailer from swaying due to an adverse event.
__________________
Roy in TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2010, 07:17 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Kip in Ga.'s Avatar
 
Name: Kip
Trailer: 2003 Casita 17' SD Deluxe, Towed by '09 Honda Ridgeline.
Georgia
Posts: 459
Clarification...
...Concerning auto transmision cooling.

(Most on this forum already understand all this, but some may not.)

Most automatic's fluids flow through passages in the radiator for cooling purposes. When the vehicle is worked hard, the engine and tranny tend to produce more heat.

Generally, auto trannys have radiators large enough to cool both the engine and tranny if the weight of vehicle and/or the load it deals with are kept at or below specified limits.

Example: An Owners Manual may state the vehicle can carry a certain amount of weight. (Let's say 600#). It may also say the vehicle can tow 1500#. The 600# references safe limits for the suspension, tires, brakes, etc. of the vehicle. The 1500# indicates how much weight the frame, suspension, cooling, brakes, rear tires, and so forth can safely handle.

NOTE: Something to watch for is a disclamer stating that the tow weight is assuming there are no more than the driver, or maybe the driver and one passenger. And any additional weight should be subtracted from the weight of the trailer. Seems like one of our recent vehicle's owners manuals said that.

A vehicle we recently traded was good to tow 1000# "as is". Anything over 1000# required brakes on the trailer and a tow package on the vehicle. The tow package consisted of wiring, hitch receiver, and auxiliary cooling for the Tranny and the Power Steering. Then it was good to tow 4500# or so. Depending on the weight inside the vehicle's cabin.

Auxiliary transmission cooling is usually, but not always, an additional smallish radiator for the tranny fluids to flow through. It can be seen in front of the radiator. Some vehicles already have the 2nd radiator and their tow package is simply a hitch and wiring. Some vehicles have an oversize radiator as part of their tow package from the factory.

Obviously a full size half ton Pick Up or SUV V8, that is not loaded to it's limits, can likely tow a 1000# trailer with ease and without auxiliary cooling. But it is good to check with the mfg to be sure. On the other hand that same vehicle towing a 5000# trailer would likely require some help with the cooling. A 3500 series Dually with diesel engine is probably already set up for heavy loads and heavy trailers.

Because we are dealing with light weight trailers and, often, light duty TVs, it be a good idea to know for sure if auxiliary cooling is required.

A happy auto transmission's fluid will be pink in color. If it is brownish, it is either over due for changing from normal wear, or it is being over heated from lack of proper cooling.

Kip
__________________
Kip in Ga. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2010, 01:17 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Cyndi B.'s Avatar
 
Name: Cyndi
Trailer: 2010 Scamp 5th Wheel/2007 Toyota Tundra/2015 Tundra
Montana
Posts: 1,105
Registry
I have brakes on the trailer, the truck just can't communicate with them yet.
__________________
Cyndi B. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 05:54 PM   #23
Member
 
Name: Sean
Trailer: Bigfoot
Saskatchewan
Posts: 91
May as well as my opinion to the fray.

Trailer brakes are a very good idea, make a world of differance in stopping and controle.

Aux cooling for auto trans equiped vehicles, always a good idea no matter how heavy the trailer is, any added load such as on inclines and winds can heat up an auto tranny to dangerous levels in no time.

As for tow vehicles, my opinion is one of get one that was built for the purpose. So most mid sized to small SUVs would be fine, I take issue with FWD vehicles towing due to the weight load in adding to the already stressed front tires.

AWD vehicles are fine, you just lose towing capacity and some milage because of the added weight of the AWD systems. Same goes for 4wd vs 2wd as well.

If you are doing short jaunts rouns alberta and into Sask, something with a 4cylender and properly equiped will be fine, though anything more and if you want to do longer trips look at something with a V6 or larger.

Also some what possible over kill here but, if you can't put a class 3 receiver hitch on it, it was never built to tow a trailer. Always be sure to read the door sticker for approved legal ratings.
__________________
Orcus79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 06:26 PM   #24
Member
 
Tezha's Avatar
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: Scamp 16'
North Dakota
Posts: 61
Registry
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyndi B. View Post
I have brakes on the trailer, the truck just can't communicate with them yet.
Same here, but next year maybe!
__________________
Tom T. American Red Cross
(USAF First Sergeant "Retired")
2008 Scamp 16'
2005 Chevrolet Extended Cab Silverado
Tezha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2010, 06:49 PM   #25
Junior Member
 
Name: Bill
Trailer: Casita
Kentucky
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmella in Canada View Post
I am planning on tripping long term once I get the hang of things. I am looking at buying a TV for my Trillium 1300 and want the most efficient on gas mileage. It will be just me so there is no need for considering hauling kids or anything unessential around. I am a minimalist. Basically I want the least amount of car/truck possible to do the job safely. I have been scanning the posts and see alot of people using smallish SUVs but I am not sure about the fuel economy with these. I suppose I should mention that my Trill doesn't have brakes. I don't really plan to get them as I am a very cautious driver. I am not very mechanically inclined so I will be asking alot of advice over the next while so I want to thank you all in advance.

The heavier the vehicle....the safer you are.......
__________________
BillandJulie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2010, 07:18 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Kip in Ga.'s Avatar
 
Name: Kip
Trailer: 2003 Casita 17' SD Deluxe, Towed by '09 Honda Ridgeline.
Georgia
Posts: 459
We visited an "Egg" rally this past Saturday.

There were 20+ Fiberglass campers there. It seemed that many or most of the folks were more than casual campers.

Didn't pay as much attention to the tow vehicles as we did the trailers themselves. But thinking back, there were a lot of full size Pick up trucks and SUVs sitting in front of the Eggs. I would bet that most of those were equipped with V8 engines.

The folks we talked to about their TVs indicated their full size vehicles are getting about the same mileage when towing as the smaller less powerful vehicles. One person was towing with a mini Van (FWD) and were thinking about getting a larger TV. Seems that 15-17 MPG towing is a fairly common number for Egg towing. Obviously on flat ground, and good weather, a fairly light weight trailer can be towed more ecconomically with a less powerful engine. So someone towing exclusively in Florida or the mid west flat states can do Okay-to-well with a 4 cylinder and small camper. But get in the mountains or even hilly country and the smaller engines will stress more. Under certain conditions they can become down right dangerous.

As stated in another post, many of the camper's published weights are for the basic models. When AC, awnings, plumbing for bathrooms, propane tanks, spare tires, etc., are added, the weight can go up significantly.
One person we talked with said his 17 ft Egg weighs in at 2800+ pounds. Ready to camp. It is advertised at something like 2100-2200+ pounds.

From our camping years ago with full size units and full size (RWD) TVs, we learned that limited slip axels are a welcome item. 4wd even better.
Four wheel drive (4WD) and AWD can cost 1-4 mpg depending on the type of drive system and driving habits and terrain. But it sure is nice if and when it is needed.

Probably a good rule of thumb would be that for casual camping close to home, and only one vehicle, consider something adequate that will get good mileage for everyday use. For lots of camping where many types of terrain may be encountered, go with more power and a larger TV.

Just another opinion!

Kip
__________________
Kip in Ga. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2010, 07:44 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Name: Jesse
Trailer: 1984 Scamp 13'
Maryland
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillandJulie View Post
The heavier the vehicle....the safer you are.......
In theory, yes... but many large trucks and SUVs are inherently unsafe. This is getting better now that electronic stability control has been mandated. However, I remember reading a very interesting study of ladder frame vs. unibody construction, and they showed that the driver of a Ford minivan running head on into a Ford large SUV (Expedition?) had 50 times the survival rate of the driver of the SUV. That was survival, let alone injuries.
__________________
mcbrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2010, 07:55 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
Name: Jesse
Trailer: 1984 Scamp 13'
Maryland
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kip in Ga. View Post
The folks we talked to about their TVs indicated their full size vehicles are getting about the same mileage when towing as the smaller less powerful vehicles. One person was towing with a mini Van (FWD) and were thinking about getting a larger TV. Seems that 15-17 MPG towing is a fairly common number for Egg towing.

Kip
This is true of many vehicles... and one of the reasons I could not find a small SUV that fit my needs -- most of them barely get more MPG than the larger SUVs. My little car gets 40 MPG pretty easily. That drops to 24-26 MPG with the Scamp in tow. I got about 25 MPG driving through the hills in south-eastern PA. Not the Rocky mountains, but still some pretty good hills. At no time was there any danger of losing control or not getting up a hill. I do want to point out that my Scion towing my Scamp and my family has the same power-to-weight ratio as a Ford F150 towing a 3,000 pound trailer.

Speaking of fuel economy: When towing, the numbers tend to be lower (and closer together), but they can be very different in the end. One vehicle might get 17 MPG and another gets 25 MPG. The difference in the cost of gas (let's say $2.80 a gallon) over the course of a 1,000 mile drive is over $52.71.

I am not against people using trucks... please don't take this as a personal attack of any kind. Many people feel the need to defend their choice of vehicle... please, don't feel the need to do that. There are reasons for some people to use a truck and reasons for other people to use a car.
__________________

__________________
mcbrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
trillium


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for 13 footer in BC kestrel p Wanted: Molded Fiberglass Travel Trailers 6 03-18-2009 09:58 PM
Want another 13 footer... jaye580 Wanted: Molded Fiberglass Travel Trailers 0 06-20-2007 12:14 AM
looking for 13 footer miriam g Wanted: Molded Fiberglass Travel Trailers 1 08-23-2006 12:25 PM
WANTED: 13 FOOTER Classified Archives 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.