Offroad washboard best axle? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-03-2014, 03:53 PM   #15
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That is great!!! Thanks. High center roads no problem. About the same price. 3 year warrantee sounds good too. Anyone else w/ Timbren Axle Less System input?
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Old 12-03-2014, 09:33 PM   #16
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somebody is missing the point here! ITS AN EGG! They are tough and durable for normal use. If you want to go offroading get something built for the purpose .
For example...

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Old 12-04-2014, 10:44 AM   #17
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Think I have to agree with Floyd on this one. The typical FGRV was not designed or engineered for serious off road travel. Not to say it cannot be modified to that purpose but that modification project starts with design and engineering of the overall structure.

There was a custom FGRV built for a rock climber but it was built from the frame up for that purpose. Essentially the gutted shell was the only "original" equipment.

I would be a little skeptical that the cabinets, seats, appliances could take the pounding implied by skid plates and skid rollers. I would also be concerned about the overall shell to floor attachment, at least on some models. Tabbing is strong but was not designed with true off road use in mind.

Ground clearance would probably provide some gain in access to back country but overall the suitability for off road is only as good as the weakest part of the structure.

After saying all that I would love to see pictures as you make any modifications.
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Old 12-04-2014, 12:09 PM   #18
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Old 12-04-2014, 12:46 PM   #19
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Think I have to agree with Floyd on this one. The typical FGRV was not designed or engineered for serious off road travel. Not to say it cannot be modified to that purpose but that modification project starts with design and engineering of the overall structure.

There was a custom FGRV built for a rock climber but it was built from the frame up for that purpose. Essentially the gutted shell was the only "original" equipment.

I would be a little skeptical that the cabinets, seats, appliances could take the pounding implied by skid plates and skid rollers. I would also be concerned about the overall shell to floor attachment, at least on some models. Tabbing is strong but was not designed with true off road use in mind.

Ground clearance would probably provide some gain in access to back country but overall the suitability for off road is only as good as the weakest part of the structure.

After saying all that I would love to see pictures as you make any modifications.
And here it is…
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:02 PM   #20
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That rig does get the wheels turning! It would be hard giving it up.
I worry about getting turned around up a narrow canyon. The 15ft Trilla is borderline to unhitch and muscle around.
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:02 PM   #21
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The best option would be to get larger wider tires so when off road you can drop the air pressure on the trailer tires to about 15 lbs like typical 4x4 enthusiast do. That would help take the beating out of the trailer. I sure like the Timbren axles. too bad they don't make them at 2500 lb range. they jump up to 3000 lbs from 2000. Short of that I would use a straight axle at 3000 lbs with lighter 2000 lb lief springs. Any thing you do needs to deal with the light weight road frame and possibly the body attachments. The first goal is a design where you have no chance of breaking an axle. Break the frame you can still jury-rig a way out. Break an axle your dead. I don't think anyone here really thinks these trailers are great off road trailers but they still could be made reasonably semi maintained dirt road road worthy short of roads for locked up 4X4 rigs.
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:30 PM   #22
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That rig does get the wheels turning! It would be hard giving it up.

It does beg the question. After investing that much money & labor, is it still not doing what the owner wants?
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:33 PM   #23
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I suspect that a Lil Hauley would do pretty well on rough trails. At appropriate speeds, of course. The frame and body seem tough enough. If the interior were outfitted sparingly and/or extra durably, it should go just about anywhere.
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Old 12-04-2014, 08:19 PM   #24
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I suspect that a Lil Hauley would do pretty well on rough trails. At appropriate speeds, of course. The frame and body seem tough enough. If the interior were outfitted sparingly and/or extra durably, it should go just about anywhere.

Only issue might be the wide track.
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Old 12-04-2014, 08:29 PM   #25
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I wonder if one of the FG teardrops such as EggCamper make might make a good high ground clearance off road camper?

Weight is less, center of gravity for the shell is lower. And they already appear to have pretty good ground clearance, and large wheel wells.
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Old 12-04-2014, 11:30 PM   #26
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Less is more.
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Old 12-07-2014, 12:29 AM   #27
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Think I have to agree with Floyd on this one. The typical FGRV was not designed or engineered for serious off road travel. Not to say it cannot be modified to that purpose but that modification project starts with design and engineering of the overall structure.

There was a custom FGRV built for a rock climber but it was built from the frame up for that purpose. Essentially the gutted shell was the only "original" equipment.

I would be a little skeptical that the cabinets, seats, appliances could take the pounding implied by skid plates and skid rollers. I would also be concerned about the overall shell to floor attachment, at least on some models. Tabbing is strong but was not designed with true off road use in mind.

Ground clearance would probably provide some gain in access to back country but overall the suitability for off road is only as good as the weakest part of the structure.

After saying all that I would love to see pictures as you make any modifications.
Roger/Floyd I think your right but I can't figure out why seemingly no one has taken this on. I'm not a mechanic or an engineer so hopefully someone here can help me in my thinking on this.

It seems to me that the biggest issue is ground clearance and the limited amount of travel inherent in a standard egg suspension. Ground clearance can be overcome to a degree with "flipping" or a straight axle but once the limit of travel has been reached it forces the body upwards placing undo stress on the frame and the contents of the trailer.

So if someone really wanted to take any trailer off road they would need a stronger frame and a more conventional car like suspension with a coil spring, a shock absorber, and maybe some kind of trailing arm. To my knowledge the only trailers built like that are some of the Australian models and a few stick built trailers made my Northwoods like the Nash and Arctic Fox.

But here is what I don't get and I'm sure someone here can illumine me. Why are regular TT suspensions set up like this? Does the limited amount of travel make for better towing qualities? Would the amount of flexing required place too much stress on a molded fiberglass body?

It just seems like all the qualities of a FGRV that we all admire on a suspension with enough ground clearance and enough travel would make for an ideal adventure vehicle. Yes, it would weigh more but not that much more. A 20 ft Nash (17K) weighs 400lb less than a 21ft Bigfoot (25B21FB )

I know that most people would never camp in the way I would. Also most people wouldn't want to secure everything to the degree necessary to go down really rough roads. That's why most trailers are built the way they are. But premium off road trailers sell well in Australia would there really be no market for a fiberglass off road trailer in North America?

What am I missing?
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Old 12-07-2014, 08:39 AM   #28
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Assorted thoughts:

- Many people assume an off-road trailer should follow off-road powered vehicle practice, but that ain't necessarily so. The trailer is suspended on three points and doesn't have high traction demands (some braking would be good...), while the powered vehicle is suspended on four points and does need maximum traction. So big axle articulation and soft suspension are needed in the four wheeler to keep the powered wheels on the ground and big tyres with low pressure are used for the same reason. None of that applies to the three-point towed trailer, since three points 'fit' any surface perfectly.

- Soft suspension may help somewhat with minimizing the load on the trailer frame/body off-road but if dampers are also added, the benefit on washboard roads will be reduced (since the dampers will restrict wheel compliance).

- Soft suspension means more wheel travel, so either the whole vehicle has to be raised up or the wheel wells enlarged.

- Timbren axle-less units do not seem to have any more suspension travel than regular torsion axles, so it's hard to see any advantage they would have off-road.

- Washboard roads, particularly if driven at speed, dramatically increase the fatigue loading on the tongue/A-frame, so either a reinforcement of the tongue/A-frame (around the critical area under the front of the body) or annual (or more frequent) inspection for fatigue cracking would be sensible if the suspension allows fast driving on washboard roads. The Australians, with plenty of washboard roads, have extremely tough standards for tongue/A-frame strength which trailers from most other countries do not pass.
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