Ram 3.0L Diesel Experience - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-30-2015, 11:15 PM   #43
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I was recently offered $7000 for my Ranger at a fuel stop, original purchase price was $13800 otd. It is now 15 years old with 170,000 miles on it.
Wow!
My 21 year old Ranger just turned over 150,000 Km, which is about 93,000 miles. 4 years till antique status. Regular maintenance parts are getting a challenge to find. Things like emergency brake cables, rear drums are taking some legwork to get.

Over the years my mindset is changing. Finding a low mileage vehicle does not necessarily mean you are going to get something with a long life. Especially if you can't be guaranteed to find replacement parts.

I'm now leaning towards thinking newer high mileage vehicles might be better suited to getting more life out of a set of wheels. A 3-4 year old vehicle with high mileage should indicate that the maintenance work has been done. Anybody putting a load of miles on in shorter time periods would need their vehicles to be optimally operational.

Consensus here seems to be that for the most part, current engines are capable of high mileage. It is the other stuff that seems to break down. What is the use of having a vehicle that you can't get the parts for?

Am I off base?
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:40 PM   #44
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Just adding my two-cent rebuttal to a couple of Mike's earlier comments: 1) that higher priced diesel engine usually holds it's value for a higher trade-in value down the road, so it's not just an extra expense up front that you won't recoup at least some of later (that is, if you ever do trade it in, I've enjoyed my current diesel truck 16 years and counting), and 2) diesel fuel isn't always more expensive than gasoline (my brother-in-law in Colorado recently told me he is currently paying less for diesel than gas). My only complaint about operating a diesel truck is that when you go through a fast food restaurant drive-thru, you have to shut the engine off to hear what the heck the person taking your order is saying over that chintzy little drive-thru speaker!
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Old 12-31-2015, 05:15 AM   #45
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One piece of experience on diesels from Europe is that most modern diesels use a DPF (diesel particulate filter) - this traps soot and periodically regenerates (burns itself clean).

However if the engine is never worked hard, such as a car only used in city driving, the DPF cannot get regenerated and can become clogged. This then requires either a forced regeneration cycle in a workshop or expensive replacement of the DPF.

This isn't going to be a problem for anyone that drives their vehicle for long distances, which presumably includes everyone here, but is a factor for others to consider. The fuel economy of diesels now appeals here in Europe to drivers quite irrespective of any financial benefit (just like big engines appeal to many drivers who never go fast) and a few city drivers have been caught by this unexpected downside.

Personally, my driving pattern provides plenty of opportunity for the DPF to regenerate, but I don't let that stop me from giving the car an 'Italian Tune-up' on a regular basis - for the good of the engine, not just for fun, you understand......
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Old 12-31-2015, 08:46 AM   #46
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My only complaint about operating a diesel truck is that when you go through a fast food restaurant drive-thru, you have to shut the engine off to hear what the heck the person taking your order is saying over that chintzy little drive-thru speaker!
I used to have to do that with some past trucks too, but not with the newer Fords. That big 6.7 litre engine is just about as quite as a big gas engine. I like that.
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Old 12-31-2015, 11:02 AM   #47
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Back a hundred or so years ago I had Diesel VW Rabbits.
I sold mine when I decided I wanted to be able to listen to the radio again!
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Old 12-31-2015, 11:12 AM   #48
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Back a hundred or so years ago I had Diesel VW Rabbits.
I sold mine when I decided I wanted to be able to listen to the radio again!
I drove a friend's once back in college. Laid back... Leisurely... Acceleration times measured in songs rather than seconds...
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Old 12-31-2015, 11:16 AM   #49
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We had two of them and Connie and I would drag race them while the people behind were honking their horns to get us to pull over to let them by.
I didn't mind the cars so much, but the ringing of the bike bells was irritating!
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Old 12-31-2015, 11:53 AM   #50
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Wow!
My 21 year old Ranger just turned over 150,000 Km, which is about 93,000 miles. 4 years till antique status. Regular maintenance parts are getting a challenge to find. Things like emergency brake cables, rear drums are taking some legwork to get.

Over the years my mindset is changing. Finding a low mileage vehicle does not necessarily mean you are going to get something with a long life. Especially if you can't be guaranteed to find replacement parts.

I'm now leaning towards thinking newer high mileage vehicles might be better suited to getting more life out of a set of wheels. A 3-4 year old vehicle with high mileage should indicate that the maintenance work has been done. Anybody putting a load of miles on in shorter time periods would need their vehicles to be optimally operational.

Consensus here seems to be that for the most part, current engines are capable of high mileage. It is the other stuff that seems to break down. What is the use of having a vehicle that you can't get the parts for?

Am I off base?
A lot of late model high mileage vehicles are lease vehicles and simply do not get more than minimal care, usually less.
The Ranger was built up until 2012, so many parts are common. The last real change came in 1998 with some engine changes and little else after that.
My 1995 Mustang is low mileage and in beautiful condition, I bought it this year instead of a new one because I wanted more car and less cellphone on wheels... Of course 300+ HP from a 2.3L I4 is remarkable and makes the new one very attractive.

I tell people who want or need to be most economical, to buy a car more than 5 and less than 14 years old. Salvage yards don't generally get cars less than 5 years old due to insurance companies claiming totals,and they usually crush cars around 14 years of age.

Manufacturers are required to supply all parts for 10 years and models tend to last at least 3 years and parts stores have parts on hand for cars once they are out of warranty and up until they start getting rare.
All this results in the aforementioned "sweet spot".
Most miles for the least dollars? Probably a well maintained 6year old vehicle from a common manufacturer.
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:12 PM   #51
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(Clip) "Manufacturers are required to supply all parts for 10 years and models tend to last at least 3 years and parts stores have parts on hand for cars once they are out of warranty and up until they start getting rare."


The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act speaks to auto manufacturers having parts available for the duration of a warranty, but I think that the 10 year number has been dismissed as being urban legend. If you know of any specific federal laws mandating that, let us all know.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus...s_Warranty_Act
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:17 PM   #52
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I drove a friend's once back in college. Laid back... Leisurely... Acceleration times measured in songs rather than seconds...
That was long ago in a galaxy far away with only naturally-aspirated diesel engines.

Modern turbo-diesels vary from effortlessly brisk (a huge torque curve with a big flat plateau) to lightning fast - 14-15 second 1/4 miles for some diesel BMWs.
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:25 PM   #53
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One piece of experience on diesels from Europe is that most modern diesels use a DPF (diesel particulate filter) - this traps soot and periodically regenerates (burns itself clean).

However if the engine is never worked hard, such as a car only used in city driving, the DPF cannot get regenerated and can become clogged. This then requires either a forced regeneration cycle in a workshop or expensive replacement of the DPF.

This isn't going to be a problem for anyone that drives their vehicle for long distances, which presumably includes everyone here, but is a factor for others to consider. The fuel economy of diesels now appeals here in Europe to drivers quite irrespective of any financial benefit (just like big engines appeal to many drivers who never go fast) and a few city drivers have been caught by this unexpected downside.

Personally, my driving pattern provides plenty of opportunity for the DPF to regenerate, but I don't let that stop me from giving the car an 'Italian Tune-up' on a regular basis - for the good of the engine, not just for fun, you understand......
That may not be a valid assumption about 'everyone here' driving for long distances. I have read complaints on the Jeep Garage forum from people who have a short commute to work, say 10-20 minutes in city traffic, and they complain that in winter weather they have regeneration problems. The system never gets hot enough.

In addition, when the regeneration cycle begins the vehicle is supposed to be driven for about another 20 minutes... but sometimes the driver is nearly at his destination at this point and cannot just keep driving.

The emissions requirements and subsequent emissions systems (DEF, DPF, etc.) have ruined the potential of diesel engines IMO.

BTW, my '98 Jetta (gas model) was a constant source of trouble. Electrical glitches, chronic check-engine light problem, cheap plastic parts that discolored and became brittle. Fun to drive, but a pain to maintain. I gave it to my daughter (who was the most frequent driver of it anyhow), and one damp night the car kept spontaneously setting off its panic alarm, causing a cop to pull her over to see why her lights were flashing. Just more typical behavior for that car. After a couple years she sold the problem child and bought a Scion xB that's been totally reliable.
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:50 PM   #54
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[QUOTE=floyd;564852]A lot of late model high mileage vehicles are lease vehicles and simply do not get more than minimal care, usually less.
The Ranger was built up until 2012, so many parts are common. The last real change came in 1998 with some engine changes and little else after that.



Also, a lot of late model LOW mileage vehicles are from rental car companies. Minimal maintenance and driver abuse are common. Here in the Pacific Northwest if you are looking at a Subaru or Toyota that is less than a year old there is a good chance it was a rental previously. If the seller (car dealer) says "program car" it was a fleet or rental car but program car sounds better when you are selling.
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Old 12-31-2015, 02:11 PM   #55
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That was long ago in a galaxy far away with only naturally-aspirated diesel engines.

Modern turbo-diesels vary from effortlessly brisk (a huge torque curve with a big flat plateau) to lightning fast - 14-15 second 1/4 miles for some diesel BMWs.
Know that full well. JD and I just took a short detour down memory lane.

On the other hand, the "Millenium Falcon" did pretty well for an old bucket of bolts. Finally got around to viewing that cinematic trip down memory lane yesterday.
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Old 12-31-2015, 02:54 PM   #56
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Know that full well. JD and I just took a short detour down memory lane.

On the other hand, the "Millenium Falcon" did pretty well for an old bucket of bolts. Finally got around to viewing that cinematic trip down memory lane yesterday.
My ".05Millenium Falcon" ran only on RBOB but it still could make the Kessel (Farms) run in less than one hour and 12secs.
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