RV Tires - Page 5 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-04-2013, 03:36 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
"RST" and "LT" are not interchangeable terms, and I don't see any LT tires on the page you linked to, so....?
"RST" is just part of the model name.

Follow the link to the details for the G614 RST (it's a pop-up without its own URL so I could not link to it directly) and you can see that in the spec chart the designation of the tire starts with "LT".
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:06 PM   #58
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The Goodyear G614RST is a commercial trailer tire.

Next?

Francesca
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:26 PM   #59
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Lt's do not get derated for use on a trailer. As with any other tire they have to meet the carrying capacity of the trailer (preferably by a good margin, IMHO).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
"Industry recommendation" is to use trailer tires for towing since they're designed mainly to track efficiently rather than to function as drive/steer tires and ride softeners like most LT's/P's must do. I myself think that putting LT's on a trailer makes about as much sense as putting fatslicks on the steer axle of a Formula one car.

I only brought this up since some folks do use LT's on trailers and may be unaware that since that's not what they're designed for some adjustment should be made/allowed for.

Francesca
Industry recommendation is a joke. They have their head up their @rse when it comes to trailer tires, they don't even build their tires for modern speed limits. I don't buy the "well, if you're not maxed out by weight, and crank up the p.s.i., 10 mph over *should* be ok" thing, either. Plus, that still puts me at exceeding the tire recommendation if I'm 1mph over speed limit. Stupid.

Yeah, I know, if I exceed 55 mph pulling my trailer, it'll explode, yadda, yadda. Each to their own, I prefer being able to do the speed limit and get to the fun, and I have a tow vehicle that's more than capably of safely doing it with twice what my 19' scamp weighs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
"RST" and "LT" are not interchangeable terms, and I don't see any LT tires on the page you linked to, so....?

What else you got?

Francesca
The one he linked to that they recommend for trailers is a lt235/85r16. Apparently the mfg thinks it's okay.

Me, I'll start believing the manufacturers know what they're doing when they start making a tire that doesn't explode 10 mph before I hit the speed limit. Until then, I choose to believe they're morons. The amount of ST tires my car trailer has eaten proves they aren't built for modern times. If I hook up for a long trip, it's a guarantee I'm using at least one spare (I've had both spares on the trailer before, had the blown ones replaced, and had to use one of the new ones, also), and all the ST tires but one are under 2 years old. The other is about 3 years old. The 15 year old weather cracked LT tire has outlasted 7-8 ST tires. Proof enough for me. The other LT's made it pretty damn far, then I changed them due to cracking...dumb. They would have outlasted the next 1-2 ST tires that replaced them.

I check hub temps and tire pressure at every gas stop, and I've had ST tires explode less than 10 minutes after doing just that.

For people that are okay with puttering around, ST's might be fine. If you're doing speed limit (at least in the states I go through), think twice. The first time one explodes (and that's the ONLY way I've had an ST go while on the road), that fiberglass trailer will look like it was ran through a paper shredder.
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:34 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
The Goodyear G614RST is a commercial trailer tire...
...built to LT standards, and clearly designated as such on the sidewall and in all Goodyear spec sheets for it, including the one linked above. Francesca, why do you refuse to read the authoritative information provided?
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:53 PM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
...built to LT standards, and clearly designated as such on the sidewall and in all Goodyear spec sheets for it, including the one linked above. Francesca, why do you refuse to read the authoritative information provided?
Because I'm a know-it-all blabbermouth, that's why! Duh....

Funny they stamp that "LT" on the tire but use "ST" in the name...not to mention call it a trailer tire at their own website. I wonder if it has anything to do with the 65mph speed rating limit for ST's. This one definitely has a higher limit...

O.K.!

I'll give you that one- there's an LT-labeled tire that's actually marketed by the manufacturer as suitable for trailers! And it's got the stiff sidewalls and shallow/simple tread pattern like ST's do...that's good for stability and rolling resistance...
It's a load range "G", too. Wow- 3700 pounds of capacity each!!!

That's a lot of tire...

My verdict:

If one needs 16 inch tires with that much capacity and has $300.00 per tire to spend: Go for this one!

Francesca

P.S.

Was that any better?

F.
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Old 01-04-2013, 06:54 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
Funny they stamp that "LT" on the tire but use "ST" in the name...
It's just a couple of letters in the name. "ST" has been used as a trim level designation for some car models, perhaps to indicate "Sport Touring" - it doesn't necessarily mean "Special Trailer".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
I'll give you that one- there's an LT-labeled tire that's actually marketed by the manufacturer as suitable for trailers!
There are actually many tires intended and used (by vehicle manufacturers as original equipment) for applications (such as light trucks, vans, and even trailers) which do not correspond to the tire construction standard name (P, LT, ST). It is particularly common for "half-ton" pickups and SUVs to use P tires. In any case, the tire characteristics and ratings (for the specific size used) must be appropriate for the use... which is the only point anyone needs to get out of this discussion.
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:04 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
It's just a couple of letters in the name. "ST" has been used as a trim level designation for some car models, perhaps to indicate "Sport Touring" - it doesn't necessarily mean "Special Trailer".

.
It's a lit-tle more than that when it comes to tires, Brian-me-lad...

For one thing, those labeled "ST" must also be labeled with the maximum speed limit of 65 mph...

There's more to it, but since this is beginning to sound more like a church service than a discussion I'll leave all closely held belief/doctrinal issues to folks' Individual Consciences!

Francesca
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:00 PM   #64
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How long does it take to Tire of a topic?
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:32 PM   #65
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I've been gunshoeing around after Floyd and his references. On the Goodyear RV tire rec site I find this:

"Be safe - if a tire has been run 20% underinflated, it must be dismounted and inspected by a trained professional. It should not be aired up without a fullinspection or without using a safety cage. Use a calibrated gauge. If your tire is rated for higher inflation pressures, a special gauge will be required designed for larger tires".

There is no reference this site to ST tires but the language is revealing about Floyd's contention that a "minimum" pressure is any particular pressure in the ST chart indexed to a particular load that it is expected to carry. I spitballed that I could run 43lb. in an ST 205/75R14 to adequately support a load of 1620lb. This is exactly what the chart indicates. My guess is that Floyd thinks that because 43lb is roughly 20% under the 50lb max inflation pressure on the 205, this is the threshold at which the tire must be dismounted and inspected BEFORE being put in service at this pressure.

Note that 1) the bullet point from Goodyear above indicates that the tire should be D&I if it has already BEEN IN SERVICE at 20% underinflation, and 2) it is NOT STATED that 20% underinflated means 20% under maximum inflation pressure.

I'm wondering if 20% underinflation really means 20% under for each tabulated pressure/load combination in the chart? Those who advocate max psi for every possible load up to the stated load capacity of the tire appear to believe that sidewall flex is the paramount issue which will not allow us to even contemplate multiple levels of inflation. If anyone IS still interested, what's your thought?

jack
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:43 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit View Post

I'm wondering if 20% underinflation really means 20% under for each tabulated pressure/load combination in the chart? Those who advocate max psi for every possible load up to the stated load capacity of the tire appear to believe that sidewall flex is the paramount issue which will not allow us to even contemplate multiple levels of inflation. If anyone IS still interested, what's your thought?

jack
As long as it's strictly technical and you don't go all "religious" on me... I'm still interested!

Tire load pressure recommendations are given as those load-related pressures under which the tire referenced will continue to perform as intended. In the case of ST's, that means that sidewall stiffness/tracking will be consistent with design performance/parameters.

Francesca
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Old 01-04-2013, 09:16 PM   #67
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If I am even minimally-capable of understanding what you say, Francesca, I agree with your interpretation of the possible practical use of correlated levels of load and inflation pressure as presented by tire makers. I am suffering a lot of self-doubt lately as I am apparently not capable of understanding some things which I have heard repeated 10 times in this thread. I think that makes me a devout Missourian but others may have a different word for me.

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Old 01-04-2013, 09:16 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit View Post
I've been gunshoeing around after Floyd and his references. On the Goodyear RV tire rec site I find this:

"Be safe - if a tire has been run 20% underinflated, it must be dismounted and inspected by a trained professional. It should not be aired up without a fullinspection or without using a safety cage. Use a calibrated gauge. If your tire is rated for higher inflation pressures, a special gauge will be required designed for larger tires".

There is no reference this site to ST tires but the language is revealing about Floyd's contention that a "minimum" pressure is any particular pressure in the ST chart indexed to a particular load that it is expected to carry. I spitballed that I could run 43lb. in an ST 205/75R14 to adequately support a load of 1620lb. This is exactly what the chart indicates. My guess is that Floyd thinks that because 43lb is roughly 20% under the 50lb max inflation pressure on the 205, this is the threshold at which the tire must be dismounted and inspected BEFORE being put in service at this pressure.

Note that 1) the bullet point from Goodyear above indicates that the tire should be D&I if it has already BEEN IN SERVICE at 20% underinflation, and 2) it is NOT STATED that 20% underinflated means 20% under maximum inflation pressure.

I'm wondering if 20% underinflation really means 20% under for each tabulated pressure/load combination in the chart? Those who advocate max psi for every possible load up to the stated load capacity of the tire appear to believe that sidewall flex is the paramount issue which will not allow us to even contemplate multiple levels of inflation. If anyone IS still interested, what's your thought?

jack
Actually.... I said what I meant to say, and I'll allow you to speak for yourself. The information I was referring to was on a PDF format on the tire sites. I can't figure out how to extract quotes from a PDF file.
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Old 01-04-2013, 09:28 PM   #69
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. . .and an elephant's faithful 100%. I'll backtrail thru your posts and check the pdf. Thanks.

jack
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Old 01-04-2013, 10:01 PM   #70
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I found this. Not exactly a guarantee, but they should know.

Tire Tech Information - Trailer Tires vs. Passenger Vehicle Tires

"Also consider that Special Trailer (ST), as well as Light Truck (LT) tires are fully rated for trailer applications. This means ST- and LT-sized tires can carry the full weight rating branded on the sidewalls when used on a trailer.However when P-metric or Euro-metric tires are used on a trailer, the load capacity branded on the sidewalls must be reduced by 9%. This means P-metric or Euro-metric tires with a maximum branded load rating of 1,874 lbs. for use on a car is only rated to carry 1,705 lbs. when used on a trailer."

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit View Post
I've been gunshoeing around after Floyd and his references. On the Goodyear RV tire rec site I find this:

"Be safe - if a tire has been run 20% underinflated, it must be dismounted and inspected by a trained professional. It should not be aired up without a fullinspection or without using a safety cage. Use a calibrated gauge. If your tire is rated for higher inflation pressures, a special gauge will be required designed for larger tires".

There is no reference this site to ST tires but the language is revealing about Floyd's contention that a "minimum" pressure is any particular pressure in the ST chart indexed to a particular load that it is expected to carry. I spitballed that I could run 43lb. in an ST 205/75R14 to adequately support a load of 1620lb. This is exactly what the chart indicates. My guess is that Floyd thinks that because 43lb is roughly 20% under the 50lb max inflation pressure on the 205, this is the threshold at which the tire must be dismounted and inspected BEFORE being put in service at this pressure.

Note that 1) the bullet point from Goodyear above indicates that the tire should be D&I if it has already BEEN IN SERVICE at 20% underinflation, and 2) it is NOT STATED that 20% underinflated means 20% under maximum inflation pressure.

I'm wondering if 20% underinflation really means 20% under for each tabulated pressure/load combination in the chart? Those who advocate max psi for every possible load up to the stated load capacity of the tire appear to believe that sidewall flex is the paramount issue which will not allow us to even contemplate multiple levels of inflation. If anyone IS still interested, what's your thought?

jack
I think it means for the weight rating, but it's hard to say. I.E., in your example, 20% under the 43 lbs.

I work on jets, we have something like it, but they only have one rated tire pressure to use. A 200 p.s.i. tire can go down to something like 110 p.s.i. and be inflated, as long as it hasn't rolled. If it's rolled, it can go down to something like 160 lbs. Anything under those, it's scrap. There's another set of pressures that if it's under, makes the tire next to it, scrap.

My personal preference is just running max pressure. It'll take the speed and weight better. If by chance, that means my camper will be bouncing all over the place, I'll consider lowering it. If it rides well at max pressure with the new tires, then they shall remain at max pressure.

Already running ST tires out of spec (speed wise), its been obvious max inflation plays an important part, even when not fully loaded. They will shred themselves below max spec. They don't do great even at max pressure, but it's much better.
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