sway with a 16" scamp - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-16-2016, 06:17 PM   #43
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Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
Posts: 1,045
I have towed my Scamp 16 with my VW Sportwagen and I can tell you the tire pressure is important.
Low trailer tire pressure and rear tires will cause problems.
With the proper tire setup and the tongue at the max per VW it tows quite well.
The setup is very stable in all conditions.


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Old 02-16-2016, 06:53 PM   #44
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Name: Wayne & Barbara
Trailer: Parkliner
Iowa
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Originally Posted by Roger H View Post
Wayne, I'm not sure how much towing experience you have, but your statement isn't entirely accurate. While the hitch does have weight, of course, but when properly set up it also spreads tongue weight evenly across the two frames and subsequently the axles, taking it off the back axle of the tow vehicle. That's why most pickups' class III hitches have a dead weight limit of 500 lbs and a WDH tongue weight limit of 1,000 lbs.
Would towing since 1987 to present, from our base in Iowa to California, Alaska, Florida, Newfoundland & Labrador qualify as experienced? the Alaska Trip alone was 11,000 miles over 2.5 months.
We started with a VW camper van and 13 ft Scamp, traded for a 2000 Scamp 16 ft, which we still have. Upgraded the TV to Honda Oddysey's (3), then a Highlander hybrid 4WD, and now a Highlander 4WD.
wc
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Old 02-16-2016, 07:03 PM   #45
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Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
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Originally Posted by Wayne Collins View Post
Would towing since 1987 to present, from our base in Iowa to California, Alaska, Florida, Newfoundland & Labrador qualify as experienced? the Alaska Trip alone was 11,000 miles over 2.5 months.
We started with a VW camper van and 13 ft Scamp, traded for a 2000 Scamp 16 ft, which we still have. Upgraded the TV to Honda Oddysey's (3), then a Highlander hybrid 4WD, and now a Highlander 4WD.
wc
Yep, sure would! I sent you PM.

Roger
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Old 02-16-2016, 07:44 PM   #46
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Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
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Dawn,

I would keep my trailer tires near max air pressure, typically 50 psi. You want stiff side walls on the trailer. Typically on a Scamp tires need to be near max to support the Scamp 16's weight and provide some margin.

Higher pressure typically reduces tire flexure and reduces heat build up.

It's the tire flexing that produces heat. That flat patch the tire makes on the ground when sitting becomes round each rotation, it's this flexure that produces most of the tire's heating. The deflection is not just in the outside radius but also the sidewalls which must deform for the bottom to flatten.

When we travel we tend to drive early in the day when it's cooler. As well slower speeds reduces tire temperature build up due to fewer tire rotations per unit time.
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Old 02-16-2016, 07:50 PM   #47
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Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
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With all the discussion on tire pressure, I don't recall anybody asking what tires were on the trailer in question.
This is where web advice goes awry.
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Old 02-16-2016, 08:04 PM   #48
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Name: Dawn
Trailer: Scamp
Alabama
Posts: 10
I checked the max pressure on the tires, 50psi on the trailer, so have it just under
car tires were rated to 50psi as well so put in 41 on the rear and 34 on the front
it tows great now
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Old 02-16-2016, 10:03 PM   #49
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Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
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Wow, that's a high psi rating on those car tires! I'm surprised. Yep, when sidewalls can flex too much it can let the trailer push the rear of the car from side to side on those squirming tires. Sometimes a lower profile tire (less sidewall) can help with this; but you already got it under control.

I would still recommend looking to see if your drawbar can be positioned deeper in the receiver (moving the ball closer to the bumper) by drilling a new hole for the cross-pin. This can be an additional aid for better handling and it costs little.
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Old 02-16-2016, 10:19 PM   #50
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Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
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You would be advised to look at the vehicle manual for correct tire pressures, or on a sticker in the door frame.
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:05 AM   #51
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Name: Carl
Trailer: 1981 Trillium 5500
Quebec
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When towing I don't inflate the tow vehicle's tire to the sticker pressure. Sticker pressure is a balance between comfort and handling within the tire's load capacity, which is good for day to day driving. When towing, much more performance is required from the tires. I inflate them to the max pressure indicated on the sidewall (35 psi in my case). This ensures maximum tire stiffness and load capability. Also they run cooler and offer less rolling resistance. Same with the trailer's tire.
Since I tow most of the summer, my tires are always kept at their max pressure. The drawback is a little stiffer ride when not towing, the benefit is I don't have to adjust pressure every time I tow, and probably some gas saving.
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:49 AM   #52
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Name: Dave
Trailer: Casita SD17 2006
California
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You would be advised to look at the vehicle manual for correct tire pressures, or on a sticker in the door frame.
That's good info Glenn if you still have the OEM tires. I haven't replaced any tires with OEM's in 50 years and the PSI's have always been different with each set. Also seems that the recommended working pressures for my truck tires over the years have gone up by 10 PSI. I remember when radials first came out, folks thought that their tires were low on air pressure because radials had a flat look to them at 30 to 32 PSI. The last few sets I've bought call for 44 PSI, both car and truck. I do run the Casita's tires at the 50 PSI they call for and have never had any problems....so far.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:29 AM   #53
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Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Magee View Post
Wow, that's a high psi rating on those car tires! I'm surprised. Yep, when sidewalls can flex too much it can let the trailer push the rear of the car from side to side on those squirming tires. Sometimes a lower profile tire (less sidewall) can help with this; but you already got it under control.

I would still recommend looking to see if your drawbar can be positioned deeper in the receiver (moving the ball closer to the bumper) by drilling a new hole for the cross-pin. This can be an additional aid for better handling and it costs little.
Hi Mike.

I"ve had my CRV rear tires in that range 38-41 and had no problems and no sway. They are rated for 44 lbs cold. Towing tire pressure has nothing to do with mfg. suggested tire pressure.

We kept the front tire pressure about 4 lbs less.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:17 PM   #54
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Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
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Yes Norm, I have vehicle tires rated for 44 psi also. But 50 psi rating, in a tire that fits a Subaru, still surprises me!

I usually run mine around 37-38 psi when towing. Nothing wrong with going to the max, though, as long as it doesn't cause the tire tread to wear more in the tread's center than at the sides. That comes down to the weight the tire is supporting.
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:50 PM   #55
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Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
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The rated pressure on the tire related to it's load rating.
The air hold up the weight the tire is made to hold the pressure that it takes to carry the load.
If you reduce the tire pressure less than the rated max the amount of weight it will carry is reduced as well.
Sway is related to the resonant frequency fo the trailer, car and the combination.
Stiffer springs raise the resonant frequency of the system. If the resonance of the load is higher than the damping from the car then it will be unstable.
Slack tires, weak shocks and rear loaded trailers get worse.
Moving the tongue weight up helps until the rear end is overloaded and the system becomes unstable again.
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:57 PM   #56
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Name: Marilyn
Trailer: 13 ft 2005 Scamp Deluxe; 2002 Subaru V6 Outback
Oregon
Posts: 175
I agree with bpfick....I easily pull a 13 ft Scamp with a 3.6 Subaru Outback. While I'd love a 16 footer, I'd have to forgo a Subaru and get a tow vehicle with even a bigger engine to pull a 16 foot trailer.

Info from a Subaru web site: "Towing Capacity:
If you have heavy things you tow around, opt for the Outback. The 2.5i Outback has a maximum towing capacity of 2,700 lbs, while the 3.6R Outback can haul 3,000 lbs. The 2015 Forester has a maximum towing capacity of 1,500 lbs."

Sorry, guess you have to make a choice.
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