tire pressure monitoring systems - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-01-2012, 11:06 PM   #15
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I lost 2 tires last year on my cargo trailer. Now I have a TST 510, and it is working fine.
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:28 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Mike Magee View Post
I lost 2 tires last year on my cargo trailer. Now I have a TST 510, and it is working fine.
The issue is NOT whether or not they sense a low pressure, that I'm sure there will just fine. It's whether or not they will create a leak and thus the increased need to send low pressure information. Thereby creating the exact situation they're supposed to warn of.
They remind of the toddler that drops his class on the floor on purpose then says "oh oh". It doesn't happen all the time but the possibilities are there.

Any nicks or dings on valve stem end are very likely to cause leakage.

Darwin, my point was that air tries to blow apart the seal around the rim of the valve stem, and the sensor defeats air pressure improving the seal of a Schrader Valve.

I imagine they will work properly much of the time, but I think there's just too much opportunity for the sensors to create the problem they're meant to detect.

Automobiles built 2007 and newer all have tire pressure sensing systems, required by law. There's two major places they put the sensors. One inside the valve stem, between the Schrader Valve and the where the stem enters the rim, or attached to the inside of the wheel. In side the tire is where I would the sensor/sender to be located, not on the valve stem.
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:44 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
The issue is NOT whether or not they sense a low pressure, that I'm sure there will just fine. It's whether or not they will create a leak and thus the increased need to send low pressure information. Thereby creating the exact situation they're supposed to warn of.
They remind of the toddler that drops his class on the floor on purpose then says "oh oh". It doesn't happen all the time but the possibilities are there.

Any nicks or dings on valve stem end are very likely to cause leakage.

Darwin, my point was that air tries to blow apart the seal around the rim of the valve stem, and the sensor defeats air pressure improving the seal of a Schrader Valve.

I imagine they will work properly much of the time, but I think there's just too much opportunity for the sensors to create the problem they're meant to detect.

Automobiles built 2007 and newer all have tire pressure sensing systems, required by law. There's two major places they put the sensors. One inside the valve stem, between the Schrader Valve and the where the stem enters the rim, or attached to the inside of the wheel. In side the tire is where I would the sensor/sender to be located, not on the valve stem.
I used valve cap monitors on on my "B" rated Marathons and they actually had the effect of holding set pressure longer than without them, even though there was no measureable leak through the schrader cores. I only quit using them when I changed to "C" rated Carlisles due to the pressure change. While I think your concerns have merit, I think they are overblown.
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Old 10-02-2012, 12:10 AM   #18
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Automobiles built 2007 and newer all have tire pressure sensing systems, required by law.
That law only applies to cars sold in the US not the law in Canada, although a number of car makers offer them. If the car came with them we are even allowed to disable them. Which if they fail one might want to do as they are not cheap to replace - I had to replace one last month and it cost $135 including labour for just one.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:04 AM   #19
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As Carol suggests in tire sensors can be expensive while valve sensors are inexpensive and are do it yourself devices.

The do it yourself feature is where the potential for leakage comes in with the user failing to tighten the sensor adequately or the user damaging the threads.

I'm sure on our next tow vehicle they'll come in the tire.

One aspect of the sensors that has surprised me is the battery life, over a year now.

Carol was the failure in your tire due to a sensor battery failure? How long had you owned the vehicle?
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:41 AM   #20
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Carol was the failure in your tire due to a sensor battery failure? How long had you owned the vehicle?
Nope not battery life failure. It was the result of the vechile being used on a very rough fairly infrequently used road to a remote trailer head - lots of big rocks one had to *very* slowly go over - the sensor is in the valve on mine and it took a hit from a rock which it wasnt happy about. No actual leak happening but the sensor inside was damaged and decided to give false readings.

Another common reason for them to malfunction is rust caused by road salt or at least thats what other owners and my dealer tells me. Common to fail after about 5 years of age if they do a lot time in the winter on salted roads. My car is 5 years old and does spend most of the winter months on roads to salted ski hills but so far I have not experenced the rust issue - it may vary from car maker to car maker as I understand some have plastic caps and others metal - metal is apparently better re the rust issue. Failure to have the cap very tight can reduce its life greatly as well or so my dealer tells me. They can also give you false readings in extream cold weather or at least the ones on mine do/did. I have experenced that as well while working ski races in the interior of rhe province - takes a large number of mles for it to decide the tire is actually ok. When I first purchased the car (it was a US car) the sensors would protest if it simple went to freezing - took 2 trips to the dealer and several phone calls by them to a US dealer (as the same car sold in Canada did not have the sensors so they didnt know how to correct it) for them to come up with a way to get it to stop doing that - now only does it if the weather is real cold in the -30C/-20D range or below. The rust and cold issue and cost are the reasons a lot of folks here in Canada dont bother to replace them if and when they fail. As its the only one I have had to replace so far & it was caused by self inflected damage I decided to replace it - if the others start to go due to rust or age I may rethink it as others have said they are not going to give you a whole lot of warning in the event of a serious fast tire failure anyways.
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:45 AM   #21
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That law only applies to cars sold in the US not the law in Canada, although a number of car makers offer them. If the car came with them we are even allowed to disable them. Which if they fail one might want to do as they are not cheap to replace - I had to replace one last month and it cost $135 including labour for just one.
Just one more reason for my recent purchase of my 1966 Falcon.
Image sharing the road with a nation full of driver's who have been judged too stupid to check their own tire pressure, by people too stupid to run their own lives. The unmitigated audacity is staggering....Geeesshhh!
BTW, We had a battery failure after less than one year on a TPMS sensor.
Warranty was denied because we had switched to aftermarket wheels.
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Old 10-02-2012, 10:13 AM   #22
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Just one more reason for my recent purchase of my 1966 Falcon.
Image sharing the road with a nation full of driver's who have been judged too stupid to check their own tire pressure, by people too stupid to run their own lives. The unmitigated audacity is staggering....Geeesshhh!
BTW, We had a battery failure after less than one year on a TPMS sensor.
Warranty was denied because we had switched to aftermarket wheels.
Floyd just add it to the list of one more reason to move to Canada. Apparently it was dedided that although legal procedings were flying in the US over the Bridgestone tire failure issue (and yes we had the same tires here at the time) the Canadian government felt the tire pressure sensors where not the answer & wouldnt stop it from happening again. Or at least thats what I was told by a few tire folks here.
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Old 10-03-2012, 06:43 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by floyd View Post
Just one more reason for my recent purchase of my 1966 Falcon.
Image sharing the road with a nation full of driver's who have been judged too stupid to check their own tire pressure, by people too stupid to run their own lives. The unmitigated audacity is staggering....Geeesshhh!
BTW, We had a battery failure after less than one year on a TPMS sensor.
Warranty was denied because we had switched to aftermarket wheels.
As I recall it was a Ford that started it all.
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:23 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
The issue is NOT whether or not they sense a low pressure, that I'm sure there will just fine. It's whether or not they will create a leak and thus the increased need to send low pressure information. Thereby creating the exact situation they're supposed to warn of.
They remind of the toddler that drops his class on the floor on purpose then says "oh oh". It doesn't happen all the time but the possibilities are there.

Any nicks or dings on valve stem end are very likely to cause leakage.

Darwin, my point was that air tries to blow apart the seal around the rim of the valve stem, and the sensor defeats air pressure improving the seal of a Schrader Valve.

I imagine they will work properly much of the time, but I think there's just too much opportunity for the sensors to create the problem they're meant to detect.

Automobiles built 2007 and newer all have tire pressure sensing systems, required by law. There's two major places they put the sensors. One inside the valve stem, between the Schrader Valve and the where the stem enters the rim, or attached to the inside of the wheel. In side the tire is where I would the sensor/sender to be located, not on the valve stem.
I simply was answering the original question, is anyone using a TPMS. Not sure why you chose to take exception to my post.

I did follow the mfr's recommendation to install metal valve stems. The monitors seal onto the stems. I am happy with my system. TST is Truck Service Technologies, and their monitors are used on plenty of 18 wheelers, with scads of miles of successful use. If they caused leaks, truckers would not use them.
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Old 10-04-2012, 12:43 PM   #25
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Just one more reason for my recent purchase of my 1966 Falcon.
Image sharing the road with a nation full of driver's who have been judged too stupid to check their own tire pressure, by people too stupid to run their own lives. The unmitigated audacity is staggering....Geeesshhh!
BTW, We had a battery failure after less than one year on a TPMS sensor.
Warranty was denied because we had switched to aftermarket wheels.
You are sharing the road with a lot of people who don't check their tires,oil level , transmission fluid level , brake fluid level ETC ETC. Most people I know just stick the key in the ignition, start the engine and if the car moves everything is okay, I am not sure they are "stupid" but are probably uneducated on how to maintain a vehicle. There is no requirement that you have to be mechanically knowledgeable about a car to own and drive one.
If I recall correctly the tire monitor system on new cars is part of the CAFE standards (under inflated tires lowers gas mileage) Doesn't it take audacity to call everyone who disagrees with you "STUPID"
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:11 PM   #26
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Mike Said: I simply was answering the original question, is anyone using a TPMS. Not sure why you chose to take exception to my post.

The thing Mike is that some people will never embrace progress. If it was not for progress we would still be riding around on horses and be waist deep in manure.
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Old 10-04-2012, 04:07 PM   #27
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The reality is that TPMS does provide useful information particularly for the portion of the poplulation who don't or can't or won't measure their tire pressures. They do seem to work. They do add to the cost of our vehicles and are an example of government intrusiveness in our lives.

As I've aged I've come to recognize that I can't change many things (or fix anyone) however I can live at peace with what is.
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Old 10-04-2012, 04:10 PM   #28
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Drifting some way off topic here, but my brand of car (Mini - yeah, laugh now...) has two different forms of flat tyre protection. To sell it in the US it has to have a dedicated TPMS with sensors attached in the wheels.

But in the rest of the world it achieves much the same effect by using the ABS brake sensors - if one tyre is going down, it will lose height and so that wheel will turn faster than the others. It's not very sensitive, needing a 5-10 psi difference to trigger it, but then doing the job using only existing components and a few lines of code in the ECU is a lot cheaper (and more durable?) than adding a dedicated system. My experience with a slow puncture was that the ABS system detected the pressure loss before I could. Full marks for effective lateral thinking by the manufacturer.
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