Tires - tow vehicle - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-10-2013, 09:31 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
As a beginning point, I'd be happy just to know if we're talking about an original Ford Ranger, as applied to the fullsized pickups, or one of the smaller Rangers that Ford brought out as a replacement for the Courier, beginning in 1983.
Good catch, Francesca. I assumed the compact Ranger, but of course your 1978 '"heavy half" would be the Ranger trim of the F-series, not the compact, and it matters which one needs tires.
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:07 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
If it's the latter, transmission info would be great too, since the manual tranny units' tow capacity is in many cases about half of those with auto transmissions.



Francesca
The lowered rating is Ford's attempt to prevent stupid and expensive warranty clutch repairs from dumb owners who can't drive a standard transmission.
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:12 PM   #17
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I don't get all the questions. They wanted to know if a stiffer sidewall will help stop sway, and the answer is yes. 99% of the time, a higher load range will have stiffer sidewalls.

It doesn't matter what the transmission is. Changing tire height means changing wheels, or gearing, or calibrating the speedometer, which is $$$ either way.

Simple answer = get the highest possible load range LT you can.
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:17 PM   #18
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The lowered rating is Ford's attempt to prevent stupid and expensive warranty clutch repairs from dumb owners who can't drive a standard transmission.
*high five*

My jaw hits the ground when everybody tells me they don't like manuals (my car and one pickup is), because the clutches go out every 40k miles...

With the exception of our 88 ranger (which broke every rule, and every part possible, miserable p.o.s.), we have NEVER replaced a clutch before an engine. Oh, and I downshift 100% of the time.

We had 240-380k mile datsuns, all on original clutches. The one in my '89 nissan with 200k on it looked like new when I pulled the engine (dropped a rock down a cylinder changing plugs, scored the cylinder).
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:25 PM   #19
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*high five*

My jaw hits the ground when everybody tells me they don't like manuals (my car and one pickup is), because the clutches go out every 40k miles...

With the exception of our 88 ranger (which broke every rule, and every part possible, miserable p.o.s.), we have NEVER replaced a clutch before an engine. Oh, and I downshift 100% of the time.
Did it have a 2.9 v6?
The 2.3 4 cylinder gas was a great engine and the 2.2 Perkins turbo diesel was awesome.
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:42 PM   #20
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Did it have a 2.9 v6?
The 2.3 4 cylinder gas was a great engine and the 2.2 Perkins turbo diesel was awesome.
Indeed it did. We bought it at 140k miles, had it until 180-90k. 3 engines, 2 clutches, maf sensor, 2 or 3 right front axle beams, all springs, twisted frame, transmission would jam between 4 and 5 (usually due to the jerking from the bad maf sensor). You had to coast off the road, pull the top off, and use a screwdriver to get the forks lined up.

The clutch burned out because you had to put it in 4 lo (hubs unlocked) and slip the clutch in order to get it going in soft field dirt.

My nissan with 200k on it did twice as much work from new, and never needed a thing.

I maintained a fleet of newer rangers for napa, never had an issue with those.

Sorry for the thread hijack.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:12 PM   #21
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I don't get all the questions. They wanted to know if a stiffer sidewall will help stop sway, and the answer is yes. 99% of the time, a higher load range will have stiffer sidewalls.

It doesn't matter what the transmission is. Changing tire height means changing wheels, or gearing, or calibrating the speedometer, which is $$$ either way.

Simple answer = get the highest possible load range LT you can.
Thanks Jared. That's exactly what I've taken from all the info I have seen in this thread. You said you didn't notice much change in the ride... what did you notice? Was it a rougher ride or more road noise with your higher load range LTs?

I assume all the questions from Francesca and others are because they are trying to be helpful with other issues such as GCWR, GAWR, axle ratio and towing capacity.

Our Ranger should have a minimum of 1200lb additional headroom when it comes to towing capacity even after including the fully loaded trailer plus gear, occupants, and items we keep in the truck bed. I'm quite happy with that as I wouldn't want to be pushing it at max capacity.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:42 PM   #22
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Thanks Jared. That's exactly what I've taken from all the info I have seen in this thread. You said you didn't notice much change in the ride... what did you notice? Was it a rougher ride or more road noise with your higher load range LTs?
Your Ranger has a fairly rough and noisy ride from the factory. (When compared to most newer 1/2 tons) You probably won't notice a change in anything except that the steering may feel more crisp due to the stiffer sidewalls not allowing as much flex.

This was the case with rangers that I've had (84,94,03)
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:17 AM   #23
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The biggest thing I've noticed with these tires is hitting the cracks/seams in the road, they're felt/heard more. Bumps are probably a little worse, hard to say. In the end, it's a truck. I'll take reduced sway and increased weight capacity any day, in trade for a small amount of roughness.

You probably won't notice as much with the c's or d's you can get on your truck.

They can likely be ran at a higher pressure than your current tires, if needed.

As mentioned, steering/cornering is better, also.
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:13 AM   #24
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I don't get all the questions....

Changing tire height means changing wheels, or gearing, or calibrating the speedometer, which is $$$ either way.
If you change overall diameter significantly, these are indeed issues. Many changes are possible without enough change in overall diameter to have gearing and calibration issues.

Wheels would require changing for some options (larger wheel / shorter sidewall with same width and lower aspect ratio), but that was my point about Ranger variations - there are lots of Ranger wheels out there in various sizes, as well as lots of proven wheel/tire fit possibilities.

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Simple answer = get the highest possible load range LT you can.
Yes, that's simple, but I notice that in his own example Jared changed section width and aspect ratio as well (P245/75R17 to LT265/70R17)... maybe load range isn't the answer to all tire questions.
Although the original post specifically mentioned stiffer sidewalls, he's getting new tires so there are more options than just the load range.

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I assume all the questions from Francesca and others are because they are trying to be helpful with other issues such as GCWR, GAWR, axle ratio and towing capacity.
Yes, GAWR is one issue, although Clayton didn't ask about towing capacity and that's not why I asked. As long as the factory tire options and axle ratings are known, I don't care about the engine for this discussion. The idea is to get to the tires which would be appropriate in overall diameter and load capacity for this specific Ranger, but have better lateral stiffness due to sidewall height, tread width, and construction.



If lateral control were only about heavy reinforcing cord in the tire, high performance cars would use high load range truck tires. Obviously, they don't. I agree that it does stiffen the sidewall, though.
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:21 AM   #25
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...... I don't have much faith in the oem putting proper tires on a vehicle, they get what's cheap for the class of most vehicles on here....... .
I was an automotive engineer for 27 years and part of my job was to vote on tire choice. Tires are basically sold by the pound and the choice is not made on cost. The tire manufacturers submit samples and they are tested by all the activities that are affected, for instance, ride and handling, braking, noise, fuel economy and durability testing. The final choice is obviously a compromise to satisfy all equity holders.
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:55 PM   #26
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Thanks Jared. That's exactly what I've taken from all the info I have seen in this thread. You said you didn't notice much change in the ride... what did you notice? Was it a rougher ride or more road noise with your higher load range LTs?

I assume all the questions from Francesca and others are because they are trying to be helpful with other issues such as GCWR, GAWR, axle ratio and towing capacity.

Our Ranger should have a minimum of 1200lb additional headroom [/COLOR]when it comes to towing capacity even after including the fully loaded trailer plus gear, occupants, and items we keep in the truck bed. I'm quite happy with that as I wouldn't want to be pushing it at max capacity.
Speaking only for myself:

I asked because our fullsized Ford Ranger has load range "E" tires on it due to its being required to do some pretty heavy work. Those tires are mighty jarring to the bones when the truck's being driven around empty, but since it's a work vehicle we put up with it.

If it was mainly a daily driver and/ or pulled a trailer as light as a Biggar, we'd put tires on it more suited to the suspension requirements of those jobs.

The size, type, and use of the vehicle is a big consideration where tires are concerned...since we still don't know which Ranger you have, not to mention if its only job is to tow the trailer or if it's also a transportation rig, my advice is that you factor that information in if/when you follow advice to "put the highest load range tires on that you can find".

And do keep in mind that you'll pay a considerable upcharge for each increase in load-bearing capacity that you may or may not need.

Good luck to you!

Francesca
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