Torque value for wheel nuts - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-13-2013, 05:52 AM   #1
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Torque value for wheel nuts

Shot in the dark here.

Bought new tires yesterday for the Scamp. I took the tires in for mounting and balancing and put them on the trailer myself last night. Hummm... wonder what the torque value is? I've got Corvette Rally wheels on the trailer and over at the Corvette Forum, they say anything between 50 and 75 ft. lbs. That's quite a range!

If no one KNOWS, I'll go down to Bob Brown's (where I bought the wheels) and ask.. but, shoot... there's so many knowledgable folks here... I thought I'd ask!

BTW, I did check at the Dexter Axle site... this is what THEY say:

Tip #2: Check wheel fastener torque frequently. Each time a wheel is removed and re-mounted, the lug nuts should be checked and re-tightened after ten (10) miles, twenty five (25) miles and fifty (50) miles and periodically thereafter.

Tip #3: Use the proper wheel fastener and torque range as specified by the wheel manufacturer. Excessive torque can permanently damage the wheel while insufficient torque can result in stud failure.

Thanks group
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Old 04-13-2013, 06:40 AM   #2
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[url]http://www.cerka.ca/catalog/torque.asp....Hopefully, it helps. In my case I would ask the shop where I buy the new rims/tires and following manufacturer's specs if I buy a new trailer.
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Old 04-13-2013, 06:42 AM   #3
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Trailer Wheel Torque Requirements
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Old 04-13-2013, 06:52 AM   #4
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Thanks Randy for the information. I think I'll go to Bob's today. It's not that far from home and I know I don't want to ruin the wheels. This time, I'm going to WRITE DOWN THE INFO
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Old 04-13-2013, 07:12 AM   #5
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Something I found out when I was restoring my Metros is there is a dry torque and a wet torque. Typically its a no no to in some cases to lubricate the thread because when you tighten the nuts you can apply more force and cinch them up tighter then had you been working on raw surface to surface metals and actually stretch the metal. I have had one AAA guy curse a blue streak because someone put on my passenger tire too tight and he couldnt get it off with his tool. Fortunately I had one of the portable 12vdc impact wrenches which took it right off. He said they're not allowed to use them as they could damage the threads if they tightened it too much and I said in this case we are taking them off so we are fine. You can knock yourself out Googling dry torque vs wet torque. Not trying to open up a can of worms here but just throwing out some info as Donna and others see that there are charts for a reason. I see Randy's chart didn't mention it. I bet there are a lot of true mechanics that can add their expertise to this conversation. Although I have several torque wrenches I have never used them on tires. Guess its an old days just tighten them down good and a 1/4 pinch more JMHO.
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Old 04-13-2013, 07:33 AM   #6
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Good points Mike. I was taught years ago to never lube threads on wheels... except the spindle. Seems to me I've always used a torque wrench on the wheels. Some days I feel stronger than others and using that wrench it's the same tightness every single time. BTW: I bought the tires two weeks in advance of a trip because once... and just once... a fresh tire was improperly mounted around the bead and was flat in 12 hours. That taught me to buy a bit in advance, rather than being stranded along side the road with a flat on a new tire (discounting all other factors).

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Old 04-13-2013, 07:41 AM   #7
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Good idea on buying and testing early. I am guilty of buying spares and then they just sit around til I need them. In the old days on cars with full tires I would rotate the spare but now I have one of those wanna-be tires that fits in your glove box. I do rotate every 6K since its free for me and I take advantage of it. "I will test my egg spare now".
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Old 04-13-2013, 11:25 AM   #8
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Aluminum alloy wheels certainly require a bit of grease or anti-seize compound on the central hub circumference to avoid corrosion welding. Removing wheels by whacking the tire with a 4x4 gets old the first time you do it. I think the lugnut torque differs for alloy vs. steel wheels.

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Old 04-13-2013, 11:27 AM   #9
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Usually, I tighten the first lug nut until it just snaps off. The subsequent ones I tighten a little less.
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Old 04-13-2013, 11:33 AM   #10
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That's the spirit!

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Old 04-13-2013, 01:17 PM   #11
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I've always been taught that determining torque is a function mainly of bolt size/grade/threadcount. The main reference we use around here is one of the many charts available online from Portland Bolt. ( link)

I'm a bit at sea about the specs given in the link Randy posted, as they seem sorta generic and in my opinion a bit low. Here's another page on wheel lug torque specifically. (Wheel Tech - Wheel Lug Torquing). It may also be of interest as it goes into the subject of both lubricants and alloy wheels.

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Old 04-13-2013, 05:30 PM   #12
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I agree with Francesca - the bolt (stud in this case) is normally the factor which determines correct torque. In cars and trucks, the stud size typically goes from 12 mm (or 7/16") for cars and the smallest trucks, to 14 mm (or 1/2") for most light trucks; the torque values go up to suit.

The strength of the parts being joined matter as well. I notice the big step up in torque between 13" wheels and 14" wheels in the Cerka chart; there's no reason that the wheel diameter would account for this, but in Dexter axles that corresponds to the step up from axles with 2200 lb capacity to those with 3500 lb capacity.

Too much torque means too much clamping force, so yes - the wheel will set an upper limit. The wheel material might be significant, but I see no difference is specific wheel nut torque for the steel wheels and alloy wheels for any of my vehicles, all of which had both types of wheel available from the factory.

Lubrication matters, too: a more slippery thread will apply more clamping force for the same thread size/pitch and torque.

I assume that the Cerka specs don't account for stud, hub, or wheel construction differences because they assume that all trailer wheels of the same size are the same design and used on similar axles with identical stud sizes.

If Donna's trailer and the Corvette for which the wheels were designed use the same size of stud, I would use the Chevrolet recommendation for torque.
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Old 04-13-2013, 05:52 PM   #13
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I'd be interested in opinions on the following quote from an old thread on this same subject:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Dumbleton View Post
My Dexter axle (5 on 4.5) uses lug nuts, with the studs remaining on the hubs -- My axle is a 2003, IIRC. Indeed, the angle of the nut or bolt head where it contacts the wheel is important because the wheels and hubs are LUG_CENTRIC, not HUB_CENTRIC.

As soon as one introduces a non-standard part, which I presume the alum wheels are, one has to be careful -- As Roger said, use an original part to get the thread and pitch and use a new wheel to get the contact angle right -- This is esp important with alum because the wrong contact angle may quickly wear and weaken the alum wheel -- This is not a problem in automotive wheels because they are usually HUB_CENTRIC.

Also, the torque of the nuts/bolts will have to be checked more often because for some reason, alum wheels tend to loosen much more easily than steel wheels, and if they get loose enuf to wallow out the holes, the wheel is scrap...
Thoughts?

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Old 04-13-2013, 06:13 PM   #14
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Back from Bob Brown's. 70 ft. lbs was the answer given. The guy helping me looked it up in a book. Who would have thought . Although Tom's soulution would work... once.
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