Towing 13' in snow - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-24-2010, 06:00 PM   #15
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Don't feel bad Joe. I never heard of that either and I have never seen a RV Trailer with chains on. Up here we do have lots of RV Trailers on the roads in the winter.
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:43 PM   #16
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Not chains .....but cleated tires may help
from sliding on curve roads.... stay slow my friend.
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Old 10-25-2010, 03:40 AM   #17
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I see Becca is in Washington state. Don't know about Washington, but in Oregon we DON'T salt our roads. It's an environmental issue and you may know, Oregonians are tree huggers.
Hi Donna,

I was aware that salt wasn't used on the flats, but I didn't realize that extended to the mountains. Sure is easier on cars and road infrastructure then in terms of rusting! I don't think I ever saw a full rocker panel until I was an adult (Combination of traveling elsewhere and newer cars being more rust resistant.)

Raya
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Old 11-02-2010, 10:37 AM   #18
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Thanks everyone for the advice! We were already expecting to drive slowly as we figure out the towing system. But it's always good to have those reminders. Fortunately, most of the driving will be on highways that don't get snow, and then a bit of snow driving.

No salt out here (save the salmon) except for Seattle which abandoned that plan 2 years ago after a big snow storm. We'll see how it works out this winter.
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:30 PM   #19
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Well if you head north to the best ski resort in NA Whistler/Blackcombe :-) you will find salt on the road between Vancouver and the mountain - in fact lots of it. Although I have driven the road thousands of times I would not tow on in winter if I did not know for sure that it was bare and dry for the whole drive. I actually want to be able to take my trailer up in mid March throught to April as I have a couple of weeks of ski races but I know all to well that there is only a 50/50 chance I will be taking it.
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Old 11-03-2010, 10:19 PM   #20
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chains are mean for traction on driving wheels ........Period
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Old 11-04-2010, 12:08 AM   #21
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Quote:
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chains are mean for traction on driving wheels ........Period

Bruce, what's going to happen of you have to stop your TV on an icy road and your chain less trailer with brakes locks up the trailer wheels, starts to skid and pass the TV?
You seem to forget the most important use of chains is to help STOP the vehicle on an icy surface.
Installing chains is a real pain in the butt. Years ago I chained my PU and not my trailer, ti had brakes, to move about 2 miles down a flat but icy road to a friends barn. About 1/2 way there a kid on a sled crossed in front of me and I had to stop quickly. I ended up with a bent tongue and damage to my PU rear bumper.
The trailer slipping and sliding around almost put me in the ditch.
REMEMBER, YOU CAN MOVE VIRTUALLY ANY VEHICLE ON AN ICY SURFACE BUT WITHOUT CHAINS YOU WILL HAVE A HELL OF A TIME STOPPING IT.
Most snow prone states now require you to chain trailer with brakes when chains are required.
Caps were not hollering but for emphasis.
I was a sheriffs deputy a long time ago and saw many accidents when the people towing trailers with brakes were to lazy to chain the trailer up when they chained the TV.
John
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Old 11-04-2010, 03:10 AM   #22
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I'll be restoring a light 13' Cadet next summer, and have considered installing electric brakes, thinking it would be good for winter travel out of the North. I plan to load the Harley in the pickup bed, hook up the Cadet, and head to the gulf for a couple of weeks mid-winter. Now, having read about the problems braking on ice etc., I'm having second thoughts about that. Pros and cons here?
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Old 11-04-2010, 05:28 AM   #23
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Chain up, drive safley and you should have no problem other than freezing your butt off while applying the chains. Enjoy the warm weather. It's the people that are not properly prepared that get in the most trouble.
John
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Old 11-04-2010, 11:59 AM   #24
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Trailer Tire Chains
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Old 11-04-2010, 04:04 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perry J View Post
Bruce, what's going to happen of you have to stop your TV on an icy road and your chain less trailer with brakes locks up the trailer wheels, starts to skid and pass the TV?
You seem to forget the most important use of chains is to help STOP the vehicle on an icy surface.
Installing chains is a real pain in the butt. Years ago I chained my PU and not my trailer, ti had brakes, to move about 2 miles down a flat but icy road to a friends barn. About 1/2 way there a kid on a sled crossed in front of me and I had to stop quickly. I ended up with a bent tongue and damage to my PU rear bumper.
The trailer slipping and sliding around almost put me in the ditch.
REMEMBER, YOU CAN MOVE VIRTUALLY ANY VEHICLE ON AN ICY SURFACE BUT WITHOUT CHAINS YOU WILL HAVE A HELL OF A TIME STOPPING IT.
Most snow prone states now require you to chain trailer with brakes when chains are required.
Caps were not hollering but for emphasis.
I was a sheriffs deputy a long time ago and saw many accidents when the people towing trailers with brakes were to lazy to chain the trailer up when they chained the TV.
John
'll tell you exactly whats gonna happen to the axle with brakes and chains on it...you now have an ice skate.
Deputies aren't experts either...calling someone in a ditch with their camper "Lazy" tells me his mind is.
Because some dingdong wrote a law he or she will never fully understand ..doesnt make it the way. Slow down or refrain from towing on ice when possible...In closing all I'll say is "if I'm right, you'll get taken out by your own creation"
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Old 11-04-2010, 05:39 PM   #26
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'll tell you exactly whats gonna happen to the axle with brakes and chains on it...you now have an ice skate.
Deputies aren't experts either...calling someone in a ditch with their camper "Lazy" tells me his mind is.
Because some dingdong wrote a law he or she will never fully understand ..doesnt make it the way. Slow down or refrain from towing on ice when possible...In closing all I'll say is "if I'm right, you'll get taken out by your own creation"
Most chains only have a chain that goes across the tread every 4th link of the chain that goes around the side. That means as the tire is rolling, a chain is on the ground only 1/4 of the time. If you apply the trailer brakes on ice, and lock up the wheels, 75% of the time the chains will not even help.
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Old 11-04-2010, 06:12 PM   #27
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Bruce your logic fails me. What happens to your vehicle when you attempt to stop on an icy road without chains? It becomes an ice skate as does your trailer. I know from real world EXPERIENCE. I almost ended up in a ditch once because I was LAZY, that's where my mind is. I was almost taken out by my own laziness.
I do agree, one should slow down and not tow in icy conditions if possible.
So much for civility!
It's apparent your knowledge and driving skills are better than a mere mortal such as my self and others. I hope someone doesn't have an accident while following your advice.
Better safe than sorry!
I have been towing something for 45 years. Everything from large stock trailers, fifth wheels, tent trailers, travel trailers, boat trailers and now my 16' Scamp, ATV trailer and fixed keel sailboat trailer which I presently own.
I have never been this strident in in voicing my opinion on this site. I know from personal experience and observation not chaining you trailer when you chain the TV is dangerous, often illegal and asking for an accident.

I apologize in advance if anyone is offended by the manner in which I made my point but not for what I said. I've seen to many needless traffic accidents in my career.
John
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Old 11-04-2010, 07:54 PM   #28
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I'll be restoring a light 13' Cadet next summer, and have considered installing electric brakes, thinking it would be good for winter travel out of the North. I plan to load the Harley in the pickup bed, hook up the Cadet, and head to the gulf for a couple of weeks mid-winter. Now, having read about the problems braking on ice etc., I'm having second thoughts about that. Pros and cons here?
Sorry...I wasn't very clear. I'm trying to determine if it is better to do snow/ice with a small camper with electric brakes and chains, or no brakes and no chains.
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