Towing a a fibre vs conventional trailer - which is easier? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-08-2012, 04:00 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by yhbae View Post
Does this mean Jayco uses much much lighter material for their internal stuff while Escape uses heavier stuff?
Or, it could mean Jayco is providing a dry, stripped down trailer weight while Escape is providing the weight for the trailer with all the features, sans options... and the list of standard features in the Escape is extensive: 19 Foot Escape
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:46 PM   #30
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Hmm, here's another example:

Bigfoot 25B175FB also looks interesting. But it has the dry weight of 2895lb which is roughly the same as Rockwood, heavier than Escape 19 by 385lb. But Bigfoot doesn't specify what is their GVWR. So would it exceed Escape's 4000 or around the level of Rockwood's 3874?

All of this is probably a non-issue if I choose a TV with 7200lb but if I do get a 5000lb TV, GVWR is getting a bit close.
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Old 09-08-2012, 10:06 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008

According to Wiki, GAWR is axle, GVWR is vehicle, GCWR is combined and GTWR is hitch.
This is true. For a single axle trailer, GVWR and GAWR (not a rating normally associated with trailers) are essentially the same.
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Old 09-08-2012, 11:00 PM   #32
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Bigfoot GVWR is likely 4300 lb ...just like the G and CB versions of the same trailer. Bigfoot RV - Truck Campers & Travel Trailers - Recreational Vehicle Manufacturer - 2500 Series Travel Trailers - Specifications The payload is about 1200 lbs.

The Bigfoot has always been a heavier trailer because of the way it is built - essentially a fiberglass shell, lots of insulation and then an inner wall (not just a layer of vinyl or fabric).

One might think that a large payload is always a good thing, but it brings with it an interesting problem if you don't actually use much of that payload...the trailer will bounce along the road because the springs are not loaded enough. That's why folks here agonize when they are replacing axles, especially on smaller trailers (ie. stay with originally sized axles, or upgrade to heavier axles/springs and get more payload).
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Old 09-08-2012, 11:12 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by yhbae View Post
I did some analysis on dry weight vs GVWR (when stated) on various trailers and they are all over the place. In some cases, they are well under 50% premium while in some cases, well over 50%.

Escape 19: 2510/4000 (1490lb, 59%)
Rockwood 1904: 2827/3874 (1047lb, 37%)
Jayco 185RB: 2740/3500 (760lb, 27%)

Does this mean Jayco uses much much lighter material for their internal stuff while Escape uses heavier stuff?
I don't think you are drawing the correct conclusion here. The dry weight includes the weight of trailer with the furniture and the basic appliances, etc. Just no propane or water in the tanks, and none of your stuff. Also, any options like air conditioning, larger stove, etc. are not included. The difference between GVWR and dry weight is the amount of payload or the amount of available load that can be added to the dry weight before the trailer is overloaded beyond its designed limits. The payload would have to include the weight of any options, water in the tanks, propane in the tanks, and all your food, clothing bedding and other stuff.

I'd expect that the weight of the internal stuff is very similar for both the Escape and the Jayco.
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Old 09-09-2012, 12:27 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
Or, it could mean Jayco is providing a dry, stripped down trailer weight while Escape is providing the weight for the trailer with all the features, sans options... and the list of standard features in the Escape is extensive: 19 Foot Escape
Not sure what would lead you to this conclusion. The trailers are similarly sized, the dry weights are pretty close and actually, the standard features on the Escape and the Jayco are pretty comparable ...
Escape:19 Foot Escape
Jayco: Standards and Options - Jay Flight Swift SLX Travel Trailers - Jayco


The Jayco site clearly states (bottom of page Floorplans - Jay Flight Swift SLX Travel Trailers - Jayco)...Unloaded Vehicle Weight (UVW): Sometimes referred to as "Dry Weight." UVW means the typical weight of this trailer as built at the factory. The UVW, as used in product literature and other promotional materials, does not include cargo, fresh water, LP gas, options or dealer-installed accessories.
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Old 09-09-2012, 12:45 AM   #35
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Cool. So that means dry weight is an important number, and it includes the weight of the attached furnitures which I assume, are relatively heavy. I only need to worry about optional items which don't typically weigh as much. This does remove a lot of confusion - thank you.

One question though - in case of Escape 19, this means the unit can handle an additional 1500lb of stuff. I doubt optional air conditioning unit, etc will come anywhere near this. Does this mean I can carry much more of my own stuff in the trailer compare to Jayco? My original plan was to keep most of the camping stuff in the SUV, only the essentials in the trailer.
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Old 09-09-2012, 02:34 AM   #36
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Yes...the Jayco included air conditioning and a microwave in the standard package, and you would probably want to add both those in the Escape. I'm just guessing, but say 150-200 lbs? Go down the option list and see what you might want to add.

But it is surprising how things can add up. Look at this thread Trailer Weights in the Real World (thanks Frederick) to see what molded fiberglass trailers can weigh when it's full of all the stuff that real folks stuff in their trailers. The Escape 19s seem to run from 3130 lbs to 3980 lbs. Bear in mind that this is just a small sampling, but its gives you an idea.

The trailer generally tows much better when not loaded to the max, so most folks do use their tow vehicles to carry as much as reasonable. Stuff like lawn chars, camp stoves, hoses, generators, etc.

Others please jump in with your experiences re: weights, loading and towing - particularly if you have an Escape 19.
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:15 PM   #37
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My cousin has an Airstream they are great, although I cannot pull his trailer, way to heavy on the tongue. The axle is much farther back. It also is much heavier than our antique trailer; A lot of the fiberglass trailers are aerodynamic in design
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:27 PM   #38
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We travel light, get our food as we need it. The trailer has a furnace so you do not need to carry a lot of bedding. Grey and Black water tanks are empty at start, no generator or other heavy items, microwave is of no use when hydro is not available where we camp. For power just battery power, flashlight and propane, maybe bikes and dog carrier. Car trunk empty while moving trailer.
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