Towing Trans and Temps - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-11-2016, 05:20 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Name: Frederick / Janis
Trailer: Previously Scamp 13 2002,2016. Scamp 16 on order
Michigan
Posts: 289
Towing Trans and Temps

Those who tow in summer type temps vis-a-vis shoulder season or even much cooler and have an automatic transmission temperature gauge/sensor, a question.

How much difference does the ambient, outside aire temperature effect what you see in trans temps while towing? What effect, if any, does towing in say 40F weather versus towing in summer's heat in the 90's have? What factual, actual readings do you re-call and what are your remembrances of the contrast?

Very much appreciate your experience in this. Thanks.
__________________

__________________
bpfick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2016, 05:51 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,030
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
The transmission radiator is normally up front of the vehicle radiator so the higher the outside temp, the less cooling of the trans oil.
__________________

__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2016, 07:23 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Name: None
Trailer: None
None
Posts: 2,730
It depends on your automatic transmission and whether you are using conventional transmission fluid or synthetic fluid.
Try to find a forum on the Web for your particular vehicle and you will probably find your answer .My 2014 Ram truck's transmission temps seemed high to me compared to my old 2011 truck (8 speed versus 5 speed) but I soon discovered they were normal for my 8 speed transmission.
__________________
steve dunham is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2016, 08:00 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Carl V's Avatar
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: 1981 Trillium 5500
Quebec
Posts: 480
Registry
The transmission wasn't really running hotter in warmer climate but it took a little more time to cool down after a climb or some stop'n go in traffic.
Actually the driving conditions (hilly vs flat, constant speed vs city driving) have a much greater impact on transmission temps than the ambiant air temperature.
I found that city driving is the worst: high power bursts with unlocked torque converter, numerous gear changes, low airflow on the transmission cooler.
__________________
Carl V is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 01:18 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Name: Frederick / Janis
Trailer: Previously Scamp 13 2002,2016. Scamp 16 on order
Michigan
Posts: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl V View Post
The transmission wasn't really running hotter in warmer climate but it took a little more time to cool down after a climb or some stop'n go in traffic.
Actually the driving conditions (hilly vs flat, constant speed vs city driving) have a much greater impact on transmission temps than the ambiant air temperature.
I found that city driving is the worst: high power bursts with unlocked torque converter, numerous gear changes, low airflow on the transmission cooler.
Thank you. This is the kind of feedback that is very helpful. Am I to assume you have a gauge you could watch that monitors your transmission temperature?
__________________
bpfick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 01:22 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Name: Frederick / Janis
Trailer: Previously Scamp 13 2002,2016. Scamp 16 on order
Michigan
Posts: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
It depends on your automatic transmission and whether you are using conventional transmission fluid or synthetic fluid.
Try to find a forum on the Web for your particular vehicle and you will probably find your answer .My 2014 Ram truck's transmission temps seemed high to me compared to my old 2011 truck (8 speed versus 5 speed) but I soon discovered they were normal for my 8 speed transmission.
Thanks Steve. Your truck came with a transmission temperature gauge I take it.
My truck is factory filled by Toyota with synthetic. My Ford Escape was as well.

Neither have/had a transmission temp gauge, thus my questions about ambient air temps of cold season towing vis-a-vis the hot of summer and what differences you may have seen on your gauge. Thanks.
__________________
bpfick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 01:38 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 1,886
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpfick View Post
..
Neither have/had a transmission temp gauge, ...
You might want to look into https://torque-bhp.com/
I use it for my Toyota to get a tranny temp reading.
Toyota is secretive with their ECM data but some clever people published the info needed to add a tranny temp gauge on the Torque app. I can't be sure the temp reading is accurate but I think its pretty close and it does track what I would expect under different conditions. You might get lucky and get a ready made tranny temp gauge in the app. You need to get a bluetooth OBD2 reader. The cost varies a lot but the one I got cheap on ebay works OK.

The highest tranny temp I saw was on the way back from the beach, a few hours into the trip on a hot summer day, when the traffic became stop and go, just creeping along, for 30 minutes.
__________________
gordon2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 01:50 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Name: None
Trailer: None
None
Posts: 2,730
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpfick View Post
Thanks Steve. Your truck came with a transmission temperature gauge I take it.
My truck is factory filled by Toyota with synthetic. My Ford Escape was as well.

Neither have/had a transmission temp gauge, thus my questions about ambient air temps of cold season towing vis-a-vis the hot of summer and what differences you may have seen on your gauge. Thanks.
My Ram truck shows transmission , oil and coolant temperatures on the vehicle EVIC . I seldom check the EVIC but I do notice that
the transmission shifts differently when it's 30 below versus 80 above. My truck has the larger radiator , an engine oil cooler and a transmission cooler.
__________________
steve dunham is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 01:53 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Carl V's Avatar
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: 1981 Trillium 5500
Quebec
Posts: 480
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpfick View Post
Am I to assume you have a gauge you could watch that monitors your transmission temperature?
I installed one on my previous tow vehicle (Nissan Quest minivan), a mechanical unit with the probe mounted in the output line from the transmission (before the rad and aux cooler). Worked nicely.

Now my current TV ('06 Toyota Highlander) didn't have one, and I planned to add one eventually, but last year someone finally figured the computer code required to extract this data from the Highlander's ECM. As Gordon mentioned, Toyota doesn't publish this kind of info and it wasn't 'discovered' until last year to my knowledge. I've been using a Scangauge for years, now my Scangauge can display the transmission temp.
I actually coded my Scangauge only last fall, and I haven't really towed anything but my utility trailer since, so it's hard to tell how good it works, but so far the displayed numbers make sense.
__________________
Carl V is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 02:12 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Jon Vermilye's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21
Oswego, NY
Posts: 1,407
Registry
I added a Scan Gauge II to my 2010 RAV4 in 2012 to keep track of the transmission temperature. Once the engine warmed up to operating temperature, the transmission temperature definitely ran hotter when temperatures were over 85F or so. I found the code for the Tacoma (at least TF1) also works for the RAV4 V6.

From the RAV4 Owner's Forum:
"Transmission temperature for 2010+ tacos. Enjoy!

Transmission Temperature 1 (Degrees F) 2010+
TXD: 07E02182
RXF: 046105820000
RXD: 2808
MTH: 00090005FFD8
NAM: TF1

Transmission Temperature 2 (Degrees F) 2010+
TXD: 07E02182
RXF: 046105820000
RXD: 3808
MTH: 00090005FFD8
NAM: TF2
*
It’s theorized that TF1 is the pan temperature, while TF2 is the converter outlet temperature so TF2 will fluctuate much faster than TF1 will."
Jon Vermilye is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 04:55 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Name: Russ
Trailer: Scamp 16' side dinette, Airstream Safari 19'
California
Posts: 588
Fredrick,
As you would expect the ambient temperature surely affects transmission operating temps. Other things also will affect temps, such as load carried, uphill grades, what gear the trans is in, and to a minor degree the type of fluid used.
I have an old Chevy 1/2 ton v8 automatic. I opted for running a very large air to fluid cooler in a different air path than piggy backed with the radiator, or internal to the radiator. I installed a temp gauge into the transmission pan. In testing I discovered the trans would run cool in any temperature environment as long as I maintained enough speed to keep the air flowing through the cooler. I took it up into the mountains during a traffic jamb where the system failed miserably. We could only travel 10 MPH for 25 miles uphill. My temps were hovering at 240F. The transmission was not slipping, nor under any hard duty, yet built heat just from not being able to lose the fluid heat. I then descended the mountain using a different highway where I could travel 40+ MPH and the temps went down to under 200F in just a few minutes. I would have to add an electric fan to fix the problem, but decided to install a manual trans in stead. It is interesting to have a good gauge and watch what happens under different situations.
Russ
__________________
ruscal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2016, 07:59 AM   #12
Member
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: 21' Escape
Tennessee
Posts: 43
Like Jon, I use a Scan Gauge II to monitor the transmission temp on my Toyota Tundra. On up hill stretches, the transmission temp can climb very quickly to 230+ deg. I can manually downshift the auto tranny and the temp will drop. The Tundra also uses synthetic fluid, but the danger with high temps is to the transmission components that cannot withstand prolonged exposure. I have considered replacing the transmission cooler with a larger one or one with a cooling fan.
__________________
Tom and Linda
ATHiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2016, 09:09 AM   #13
Junior Member
 
Name: A&B
Trailer: 2011 Casita SD
Ontario
Posts: 21
Also using the ScangaugeII in our 2008 Toyota Sienna towing a Casita 17. Had installed an additional tranny cooler. Temps in winter are in the 130, 150 or so in summer when not towing. When towing temps are steady at 178 unless on a incline or idling in traffic where it will climb to 200. As soon as the cooler get some air flow it returns to 178 or somewhere near. Highest tempeture I've seen is 215. Using sythetic oil and no excessive speeds...55 - 60 mph. With the ScangaugeII also able to monitor rad fluid temps. If I had to do it over again I would set it up so the additional cooler would be by-passed in winter.
__________________
AandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2016, 11:37 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Name: Frederick / Janis
Trailer: Previously Scamp 13 2002,2016. Scamp 16 on order
Michigan
Posts: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by AandB View Post
Also using the ScangaugeII in our 2008 Toyota Sienna towing a Casita 17. Had installed an additional tranny cooler. Temps in winter are in the 130, 150 or so in summer when not towing. When towing temps are steady at 178 unless on a incline or idling in traffic where it will climb to 200. As soon as the cooler get some air flow it returns to 178 or somewhere near. Highest tempeture I've seen is 215. Using sythetic oil and no excessive speeds...55 - 60 mph. With the ScangaugeII also able to monitor rad fluid temps. If I had to do it over again I would set it up so the additional cooler would be by-passed in winter.
Andy, if I read your reports correctly,

Winter, not towing 130
Summer not towing 150+
Summer towing 178
Summer under duress 200

These "increments" are roughly in 20 degrees rises. Ambient air temp does have an impact. Towing has an impact and towing under duress an additional impact.

Thanks very, very much. This is data. Real data. Much appreciated.
__________________

__________________
bpfick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can I use 3M 90 adhesive at temps less than 65? Vickie B. Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 2 05-13-2011 09:01 PM
Transmission temps Kevin K General Chat 9 01-25-2009 12:51 PM
Trans cooler rory m Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 5 08-09-2008 11:15 PM
trailer axle temps D Martin Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 9 04-10-2007 05:50 PM
Pulling a fiberglass trailer in temps below freezing Buck62 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 6 12-06-2006 09:19 AM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.