towing weight - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-20-2008, 08:41 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
Wendy, a fiberglass trailer might not work, but this will: Combi-Camp

While the company is Danish, and the website is for the UK distributor, there are Combi Camps in the U.S. and they come up fairly regularly on the used market. I had one for a number of years. They weigh something like 300 lbs and are absolutely huge when set up. They're VERY easy to set up and use too. The tongue folds, and there are bars made so it can be stored on end in your garage. They're a pretty trick outfit.

Here are a couple currently for sale:

one in New Mexico

One in Alabama... the ad is from April, '07

Roger
__________________

__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2008, 07:20 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
Quote:
I pulled the sticker off the window so I could have the info and be sure exactly what I'm dealing with.

It says:
Ford Escape 2008 XLT FWD
103" wheelbase
Duratec 2.3L l4 engine
4 - speed automatic O/D trans
Here're some numbers from a FOMOCO download of the 2007 OM:

load of your loaded vehicle when figuring the total weight.
4x2
GCWR (Gross Combined Weight Rating)/Trailer Weights
Engine Maximum
GCWR - lb.
(kg)
Trailer Weight
Range - lb.
(kg)
Maximum
frontal area of
trailer - ft2
(m)2
2.3L w/manual
transmission
4860 (2204) 1500 (680) 24 (2.2)
2.3L
w/automatic
transmission
4940 (2241) 1500 (680) 24 (2.2 )
3.0L
w/automatic
transmission
7080 (3211 ) 3500 (1588) 30 (2.8)
Notes: For high altitude operation, reduce GCW by 2% per 1000 ft.
(300 meters) elevation. For definitions of terms and instructions on
calculating your vehicle’s load, refer to Vehicle loading in this chapter.
Maximum trailer weights shown. The combined weight of the completed
towing vehicle and the loaded trailer must not exceed the GCWR.
The Escape is capable of pulling the maximum trailer weight(s) as
specified above. Certain states require electric trailer brakes for trailers
over a specified weight. The Escape vehicle electrical system is not
equipped to accommodate electric trailer brakes.
2007 Escape (204)
Owners Guide (post-2002-fmt)
USA (fus)
Tires, Wheels and Loading
167
4x4
GCWR (Gross Combined Weight Rating)/Trailer Weights
Engine Maximum
GCWR - lb.
(kg)
Trailer Weight
Range - lb.
(kg)
Maximum
frontal area of
trailer - ft2
(m)2
2.3L w/manual
transmission
5040 (2286) 1500 (680) 24 (2.2)
2.3L
w/automatic
transmission
5100 (2313) 1500 (680 ) 24 (2.2)
3.0L
w/automatic
transmission
7240 (3284 ) 3500 (1588 ) 30 (2.8


Hard to read, but with the 2.3L engine the limit is 1,500 lbs; with the 3.0L it is 3,500 lbs.
__________________

__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2008, 10:43 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
brendadave's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1976 Trillium 13 ft
Posts: 218
Quote:
I pulled the sticker off the window so I could have the info and be sure exactly what I'm dealing with.

It says:
Ford Escape 2008 XLT FWD
103" wheelbase
Duratec 2.3L l4 engine
4 - speed automatic O/D trans

Based on that............there's just not much out there that will work. Bugger.

Thanks for your help!!
Wendy
Strange, from the Ford.ca website...maybe check with your local dealer. In Canada it seems the XLT is rated for 2000lbs.

Specs and Dimensions 2008 Escape XLT 2.3L
Engine displacement 2.3 L
Engine horsepower 153hp @ 5,800RPM -
Engine torque 152 lb.-ft. @ 4,250RPM
Engine bore x stroke 87.5mm x 94.0mm (3.44" x 3.70")
Compression ratio 9.70 to 1
Curb weight 1,503kg (3,313lbs)
Front curb weight 907kg (2,000lbs)
Rear curb weight 591kg (1,303lbs)
GVWR 2,041kg (4,500lbs) 2,041kg
Front GAWR 1,079kg (2,379lbs)
Rear GAWR 986kg (2,174lbs)
Front axle capacity 1,125kg (2,480lbs)
Rear axle capacity 1,089kg (2,401lbs)
Front spring rating 1,107kg (2,441lbs)
Rear spring rating 1,089kg (2,401lbs)
[b]Towing capacity 907kg (2,000lbs)
GCWR 2,259kg (4,980lbs)
__________________
brendadave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2008, 11:28 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
Devil be in the details. The data you quoted was for the 2.3L engine in 2008. Hidden in the data I quoted from 2008 (latest manual I found) is the 3.0L engine which is 3,500 lbs. The Owner's Manual doesn't differentiate as to XLT, just engine and transmission and 2WD/4WD. Because they don't address it, I presume all the Escape rear ends have the same gear ratio.

3.0L
w/automatic
transmission
7080 (3211 ) 3500 (1588) 30 (2.8)

2.3L
w/automatic
transmission
4940 (2241) 1500 (680) 24 (2.2 )

Because the tow capacity more than doubles with the not-so-much-bigger engine, I suspect that either the transmissions are different or Ford has had historical problems with the smaller engine (or maybe transmission).

2000 lbs is OK for a lightly loaded Scamp 13', but 1,500 is marginal at best.
__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 12:50 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Wayne D's Avatar
 
Trailer: Northern Lite (The TARDIS)
Posts: 138
Have you considered a teardrop trailer? I believe that even the largest of those doesn't go over 1000 pounds.
__________________
Wayne D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 09:54 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
brendadave's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1976 Trillium 13 ft
Posts: 218
Quote:
Because the tow capacity more than doubles with the not-so-much-bigger engine, I suspect that either the transmissions are different or Ford has had historical problems with the smaller engine (or maybe transmission).

2000 lbs is OK for a lightly loaded Scamp 13', but 1,500 is marginal at best.
The reason for the tow rating going from 2000lb to 3500lb comes from 2 requirements, 1 being the 3.0L engine, and the other is the factory tow kit consisting of class II hitch (3500lb) and an engine oil cooler.

I know of people towing Bolers and Trilliums with older Escapes with the 2.3L engine, and power didn't seem to be an issue, whether they installed an oil cooler, I couldn't tell you.
__________________
brendadave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 05:26 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
Usually, the hitch doesn't determine the car, the car determines which hitch is appropriate.

Additional transmission cooling is almost always a good thing for automatic transmissions.
__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 09:37 PM   #22
Member
 
Trailer: 1985 Scamp 16 ft
Posts: 97
Said Pete:

"Because the tow capacity more than doubles with the not-so-much-bigger engine, I suspect that either the transmissions are different or Ford has had historical problems with the smaller engine (or maybe transmission)."

And said I- That may be true. But the poster's "company car" situation seems the ideal opportunity to put the drivetrain's durability to the test.

There is a vast difference between the Escape's lower and higher ratings, depending on the engine. The 4-cylinder seems underpowered, with almost 50 hp less than my "marginal" tug, a Forester. On the other hand, I doubt it would be so dangerous to tow 1,500 lbs, or even a little more, with the lesser Escape. Both models are the same wheelbase and approximately the same weight. Your 4-cylinder shares the same tires, suspension and brakes as its big brother 6-cylinder, doesn't it? That's what contributes to vehicle control in emergency situations, not horsepower.

I suspect somewhere at Ford a decision was made to minimize the company's exposure to warranty claims and lawsuits by setting very restrictive tow limits on the lesser Escape. That pushes more buyers towards the higher-priced model, which is good for the company, too.

The nice thing about a small tow vehicle is that you're never tempted to overconfidence, so you drive cautiously. In your situation, I'd take the chance of hitching up the lightest 13' trailer you can find and giving it a try. I'd expect the towing experience to be slow, perhaps frustratingly slow, but not necessarily dangerous. Your trailer would still only be about half your truck's weight. Towing 3,500 lbs with the 6-cylinder Escape, I'd expect that to be more dangerous, because there's about the same mass on both sides of the hitch, and more weight to brake to a stop.

That's my humble advice, based on limited experience and incomplete enlightenment.


__________________
John Mc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 06:45 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Steve L.'s Avatar
 
Name: Steve
Trailer: 2003 Casita 16' SD
Michigan
Posts: 1,690
Registry
Quote:
I suspect somewhere at Ford a decision was made to minimize the company's exposure to warranty claims and lawsuits by setting very restrictive tow limits on the lesser Escape. That pushes more buyers towards the higher-priced model, which is good for the company, too.
I'm sorry, and I mean this in the nicest possible way, but, your suspicions would be mostly wrong. Rather, it behooves the company to advertise and support the highest tow ratings safety and durability allow. Those (safety and durability) are the limiting factors.

If the Escape could safely tow a 10,000 pound trailer but burned out the transmission in 1,000 miles I'm pretty sure it's not a conspiracy by the auto companies to artificially limit capacities or bump customers up to a pricier model. Customers are not pleased with constant warranty visits to the dealership even if everything is covered.

I know you're not slamming anybody, but there really are good reasons for the technical limits the manufacturers place on their vehicles that are not profit motivated.
__________________
Quando omni flunkus, moritati
Steve L. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 06:17 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
I noticed that several years ago, Ford suddenly, without any actual equipment changes, down-rated just about all their trucks with manual transmissions, from Rangers to F350 duallies. On the smaller trucks (think smaller clutches), the downratings were as much as 50%!! On the top end, they were only a few hundred pounds out of thousands.

I spoke with the truck manager of a local dealership and he said it was mostly due to lack of driver skill and subsequent clutch damage -- Apparently Ford was tired of dealing with the customer relation problem. So, if what he told me is based in fact, a skilled driver might likely be able to tow safely with an MT up to the rating of the same truck with an AT -- But it wouldn't help in liability court...
__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 08:43 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
Here's some info posted by a Yahoo Scamper on using an Escape. This person has a LOT of experience with Ford Rangers used as fleet vehicles and as his personal vehicles.

QUOTE
My Escape is 153HP 4CYL 5SPD. And it tows my loaded Scamp 13deluxe very
nicely, with a class III hitch and Electric brakes. It does best at
moderate speeds, however.

I took one 400 mile roundtrip and drove the Escape 65 MPH and
averaged 18.7MPG . Since then we have taken 4 trips with it, the
longest 1200miles "RT" and the shortest 400miles "RT". We drove 58MPH
in overdrive and averaged 24MPG. The motor and gearing "likes" this
speed and we don't need to down shift except on the steepest grades.I
live in the midwest and we only encounter a few really steep grades
for short distances. Also we went north most trips and had little use
for the air conditioning. The Escape is a very nice match for a
thirteen as far as handling and towing is concerned. I actually get
better mileage towing at 58MPH than I get around town & short local
trips at 75-80MPH on the interstate. The Escape works harder than I
want it to,when towing at speeds above 65 MPH as it starts leaving
it's effective powerband.
As you know, our thirteen is a deluxe [oak interior]with a front
shower/toilet and every compatible option except the second propane
tank.
To draw a comparison, The Ranger just ignores the trailer and there
is no more than about a 3.5MPG difference regardless of terrain or
driving habits. Even in steep grades the Ranger is nearly oblivious
to the trailer.

END QUOTE
__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 05:50 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
Here's more input from a different poster on the Yahoo Scampers Group.

QUOTE
"REQUIRED EQUIPMENT
Required Equipment includes items
that must be installed. Your New
Vehicle Limited Warranty (see your
Dealer for a copy) may be voided if you
tow without them.
Escape
• For Trailers Over 1,500 Pounds –
3.0L V6 Engine"

From member posts on this forum and others, real world scale weights
from 13' eggs tend to be over not under 1500# wet/loaded for use.

So, the Escape 2.3L, or any other vehicle with a 1500# tow rating, is
not a great tow vehicle for any egg. A "great match" is not just one
that can do the job (as evidence by the fact that it has done so
without incident) but it SHOULD have ample capability to do so.
Ideally, this includes a margin of reserve capacity (hence the basis
for the 75% rule).

Happy trails
END QUOTE
__________________

__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
weighing, weight


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Towing package and tongue weight WaltP Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 4 04-01-2009 10:47 PM
Tongue-weight and level when towing Bobbie Mayer Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 7 09-08-2007 01:27 PM
Tow weight vs vehicle weight Paula Bindrich Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 20 06-21-2007 09:16 PM
Towing Weight Reduction Loren G. Hedahl General Chat 17 04-05-2006 04:27 PM
towing weight Legacy Posts Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 15 02-10-2003 08:32 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.