Using anti seize compound on wheel lugs - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-17-2014, 09:55 PM   #15
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If Tire Rack advising aginst the use of anti-seize on wheel studs isn't enough,
here's a link to a truckers' site that explains in some detail why it's a bad idea.

As for those who've "done it for years without mishap", all I can say is that I hope your luck continues to hold.
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Old 02-18-2014, 06:09 PM   #16
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After shearing off 17/20 rusted studs on a trailer, I use it. I torque them before every trip, never had one tighten after the initial time. I don't believe for a second it could let them loosen up, unless you got it on the seat.
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Old 02-18-2014, 07:03 PM   #17
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The second article had the best reason to never use anti seize, if you use anti seize and ever have any kind of wheel failure where someone were to get hurt a liability lawyer will be able to sue you for more money because you have obviously recklessly endangered the public. But his statement of anti seize reducing the clamping force per foot pound of torque is exactly backwards. Using a dry torque value for a lubricated fastener increases the load or clamping force on the fastener. Lubricated fastener torque values are always lower to achieve the same fastener loading.
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Old 02-18-2014, 08:39 PM   #18
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Here is a related article;Loose Wheel Nuts - Causes and Effects, News Articles

Looks like 40 to 60 lost wheels a week in the US.
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Old 02-18-2014, 09:24 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by David Clinkenbeard View Post
Here is a related article;Loose Wheel Nuts - Causes and Effects, News Articles

Looks like 40 to 60 lost wheels a week in the US.
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Somehow a claim about the frequency of loose lugs, made by a company that sells something to reduce loose lug nuts, without any reference as to it's source for that information, holds little water for me.

But, with over 250 Million vehicles (per wikkipedia) on the road, each with as many as 4 wheels each, if as many as 2500 came off in a year, thats still only a 1 in 10,000,000 chance one will be on a given vehicle.
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Old 02-19-2014, 11:13 AM   #20
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Read your manual that came with the vehicle and do what it states and nothing more.
If your vehicle came with a Toque Wrench - Use it and if it didn't then just tighten how the book states.
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Old 02-22-2014, 06:19 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Darwin Maring View Post
Silver: You have to be really careful when you apply it it the spark plug threads and not get it on or near the electrode because it is conductive and can cause misfires. It was mandatory in the Army to put it on aircraft spark plugs because without it, the plug would weld itself to the aluminum cylinder and you would strip the cylinder threads upon removal. I still use the stuff today on all spark plugs. I think the anti compound is graphite based.
I only saw the problem on bud wheels one time on the anti seize actually making removal difficult. But I have seen the issue on spark plugs several times. We used to use it on air cooled VW engines for the same reason you did. But we learned to use copper anti seize for spark plugs. The standard silver colored stuff is aluminum based and had two problems - it dried out and made the threads stick worse, and it caused misfire issues.

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Old 02-22-2014, 06:53 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
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Somehow a claim about the frequency of loose lugs, made by a company that sells something to reduce loose lug nuts, without any reference as to it's source for that information, holds little water for me.
.
It's not a pretend problem or something dreamed up to sell product.

You have to be a member of SAE International to read the (rather dry) document at this link, but anyone can read its author's "for the layman" article on the subject at this link.

And here's one recent example of mfr. concern per lug nut loosening:
(19,000 2013 Cadillacs recalled). link
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Old 02-22-2014, 08:03 PM   #23
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Good article, but I stand by my poo-pooing:

The article only estimates 750-1050 separations per year, about twice what the seller claims, and the SAE doesn't specify how many occurred on cars & light trailers vs. over the road trucks.

But the good piece of info in the SAE article is:

"The remedy to the wrong or lost clamping force is to have the wheel nuts re-torqued after a short driving distance. Although wheel separations are rare, they should be entirely preventable with re-torqueing."
In short, if they are put on right, and then re-torqued, they don't come off.....


And as long as none of us don't pull with a 2013 Cadillac, we should be safe.....and that sounds like an engineering problem anyway, but I will send a note to Can-Am, just in case.....

And again, the original claim didn't quote any known sources, hence my doubts.
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Old 02-25-2014, 01:11 PM   #24
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Warning, thread hijack:

When I used to ride a Gold Wing motorcycle, the one thing everyone agreed on was that if the rear wheel had to be removed to fix a puncture, the splines in the hub had to be lubricated before the wheel was replaced, if there was to be any hope of ever removing it again.

One Australian said that when he had a flat in the bush, he used Vegemite (an Australian national delicacy for spreading on bread/toast) and reckoned it did a better job than proper anti-seize compounds.

A British wag then responded that if Vegemite worked, Marmite (a similar British national delicacy for spreading on bread/toast) would work even better and pretty soon international war had broken out over the anti-seize properties of tangy spreads.

I would like to make clear I'm not suggesting peanut butter has any value as an anti-seize compound, but then again.......
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Old 02-25-2014, 02:54 PM   #25
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Peanut butter is PERFECT. Smooth is an anti-seize, crunchy is a thread lock material. Four out of Five moms agree.

Back side of an aluminum rim can weld itself with oxidation to the hub, have had to use a pretty heavy dead blow hammer to break that connection. So I am +1 on putting it there.

Torque, drive, then re-torque is solid advice, with or without anti-seize product. Proper initial torque not just driven on with impact driver at the shop is import if you don't want to be on the side of the road waiting for an air compressor and impact gun to change a tire.

I don't carry a 4 way tire tool in my camper, too bulky, what I do carry is a cheap needle type torque wrench and correct 6 sided socket for my lugs. Works as a heck of a breaker bar and allows tighten and re-check to repeatable if not precise torque.

I also generally use a tiny amount of anti-seize, pipe dope, or lubricant just to help prevent seizing but can't argue that it's somehow "better" just the way I was shown decades ago so I use it.
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Old 02-25-2014, 03:29 PM   #26
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Works as a heck of a breaker bar and allows tighten and re-check to repeatable if not precise torque.
I went to Canadian Tire site to search because I'm positive I read instructions to never use torque wrench as a breaker bar.
Couldn't find that instruction ( maybe it's with my wrench, in the car ), but I did learn that the 3/8" torque wrench from Canadian Tire is NOT to be used to torque lug nuts. Needs to be 1/2" torque wrench for lug nuts.
Since I don't have the receipt, and I'm sure mine is 3/8", I guess I now have an expensive breaker bar, since I've got no other use for it.
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Old 02-25-2014, 03:34 PM   #27
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Went out to the car to check instruction manual.
Whew! I have the 1/2" drive torque wrench.
And on the front page of the instruction manual, it says, "do not use as a breaker bar".
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Old 02-25-2014, 04:02 PM   #28
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I carry a 1/2" drive breaker bar and hex impact socket in all my vehicles.
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