Using anti seize compound on wheel lugs - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-25-2014, 05:22 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
Went out to the car to check instruction manual.
Whew! I have the 1/2" drive torque wrench.
And on the front page of the instruction manual, it says, "do not use as a breaker bar".
That is why I use a cheap old needle type and not my expensive ratchet click release torque wrench, and it has a 1/2 & 3/8 on opposite sides of the head. I don't care about it as a torque wrench.

Looks like this one Neiko Classic Needle-Style Dual 3/8-Inch & 1/2-Inch Drive 0-150 Ft./Lb. SAE & Metric Torque Wrench - Amazon.com

Can't recall if it was cheaper than that 3 decades ago when I bought it But for $14 I might buy another one, I kind of miss having it in my tool box instead of the camper.
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Old 02-25-2014, 05:30 PM   #30
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Yup. That's my old one.
Needle fell off some time in the past 20 years.
It too is a breaker bar.
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Old 03-24-2014, 12:26 PM   #31
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Ha! Thanks for the laugh! Best of day!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Gibbens View Post
Warning, thread hijack:

When I used to ride a Gold Wing motorcycle, the one thing everyone agreed on was that if the rear wheel had to be removed to fix a puncture, the splines in the hub had to be lubricated before the wheel was replaced, if there was to be any hope of ever removing it again.

One Australian said that when he had a flat in the bush, he used Vegemite (an Australian national delicacy for spreading on bread/toast) and reckoned it did a better job than proper anti-seize compounds.

A British wag then responded that if Vegemite worked, Marmite (a similar British national delicacy for spreading on bread/toast) would work even better and pretty soon international war had broken out over the anti-seize properties of tangy spreads.

I would like to make clear I'm not suggesting peanut butter has any value as an anti-seize compound, but then again.......
Andrew, I really appreciated this having had both delicacies! Thanks for posting ths! Cheers!
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Old 03-24-2014, 12:47 PM   #32
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I called Dexter axle after reading the Dexter owners manual (NO mention of anti seize or lubricant in the manual) Dexter's engineer said they do not recommend the use of anti seize or grease .They told me to torque the wheel nuts to spec (DRY) and then spray WD 40 on the exposed stud threads to prevent corrosion
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Old 03-24-2014, 02:26 PM   #33
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Andrew, I really appreciated this having had both delicacies!
Gigi, that makes you very adventurous for a North American! When the Vegemite.v.Marmite war reached its climax, an American forum member was proposed as an independent 'adjudicator' to try the taste of both products.

The 'adjudicator' claimed that his wife developed a taste for Vegemite but that neither of them was willing to go further than just smelling the open jar of Marmite. Nobody would credit that, in both countries, these spreads were regularly served to small children.
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Old 11-09-2014, 05:24 PM   #34
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been a mechanic for almost 40 years . always use anti sieze on hub and wheel nuts . I always use a torque wrentch . never had a problem . but thats just me . good luck !! John
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Old 11-09-2014, 06:00 PM   #35
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I personally called Dexter and talked to a Dexter engineer . Dexter does not recommend the use of anti sieze on the wheel studs . I asked about what I could use on the studs to stop rust from road salt .I was told to torque the wheel nuts to the proper torque and spray the wheel studs with W-D40 or a similar product
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Old 11-09-2014, 06:45 PM   #36
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I lubricate my studs, honestly not knowing what's correct.

I tighten them with a torque wrench and check them regularly with the torque wrench, probably once a month and always before a big trip.

When we had a motor home the rule of thump was torque them down, drive 50 miles and re-torque. Not that religious with the trailer.

I never let dealers use an impact wrench anymore. I've had them put tires on so tight that Ginny's had to help. We now carry a breaker bar, a 1.5 foot steel pipe.
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Old 11-12-2014, 04:59 PM   #37
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Darn, now I'm jonesin' for some Marmite. Vegemite will do in a pinch. Sounds like an excuse to visit the great white north

When I was working at a trailer shop that performed DOT inspections for trucks this topic came up. When we approached the authorities we were informed that they would flag a truck for have anti-seize on its wheel bolts. When pressed on the issue we were told a light penetrating oil would be "acceptable", though not recommended.

I like the Dexter recommendation as it addresses the torque issue and still helps prevent seized lug nuts.

Jason


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Old 11-13-2014, 10:32 AM   #38
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Darn, now I'm jonesin' for some Marmite. Vegemite will do in a pinch. Sounds like an excuse to visit the great white north
Sure, it sounds attractive, when you think all the other kids are spreading it on their studs and splines and you're not getting any of the action.

But it will get you hooked on 'hard lubricants' like copper anti-seize quicker than you think. Remember Nancy R's wise words: "Just say No!".
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Old 11-22-2014, 11:36 AM   #39
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I used anti seize on my car's lugs, and promptly torqued it to the point where the 'stud' broke. A better way to avoid stuck nuts is just a squirt of WD40 on the treads to prevent corrosion from forming. Also, a good, long lug wrench will ease removal of tight nuts.
Happy Trailering!
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Old 11-22-2014, 11:51 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
Several members mentioned the use of thread locker on my other post and upon research I found the product called anti seize compound. I ordered both but upon research have found there are two sides on the use of this product on your wheel lugs. some say the use allows too much torque to be applied while others say it makes the removal of wheel a lot easier. What do feel is best?
Guess that settles it!
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Old 11-22-2014, 12:17 PM   #41
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To each there own.... If you use anti sieze compound be real careful not to overtighten with a large star lug wrench and you will be fine. I tried it and didn't pay attention to torque and smooshed the beveled sides of the lug nut and the rim.... definitely my fault but i took and sprayed some starting fluid on them to clean them off and now i can feel the correct amount of torque without using a torque wrench.
Either way will work but just be careful
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Old 11-24-2014, 07:00 AM   #42
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I've anti-seized all wheel studs, never had a problem. I also use a torque wrench. I wouldn't get it between the wheel and nut, though.


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