Wanna tow Scamp 16' with Subaru Forester - Page 12 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-11-2012, 09:25 PM   #155
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Name: Jesse
Trailer: 1984 Scamp 13'
Maryland
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by honda03842
Bolers are the parents of all Scamps and Casitas. My recollection is that the Boler was capable of being towed by a VW. At least that's what I heard the goal was and not some monster V8.

Is this true Boler fans?

Looking for historical accuracy here.
From the story I read, they were designed to be towed by air cooled VW beetles.

Airstreams were towed by rear wheel drive V8 sedans. I find it more than a bit silly that anyone thinks you need a body-on-frame car with a V8 to tow a Scamp. I imagine this is an attempt at humor.

My Scamp towed well behind a subcompact Toyota with a 1.8 liter engine... Tows like a dream behind my mid size Subaru with a 2.5 liter engine. My unibody van is crippled by its design... Only able to tow a measly 9,000 pounds. Of course, it has a HUGE 2.7 liter engine to get it all moving.
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SOLD! - 1984 Scamp 13 in Maryland.
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:41 PM   #156
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Name: Dave
Trailer: Bigfoot 25 RB and Bigfoot 21RB
British Columbia
Posts: 1,143
Quote:
Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
Bolers are the parents of all Scamps and Casitas. My recollection is that the Boler was capable of being towed by a VW. At least that's what I heard the goal was and not some monster V8.

Is this true Boler fans?

Looking for historical accuracy here.

I' cannot recall ever seeing a bug tow ANYTHING (and how would you put a hitch on one - given where the exhaust was - remember that appearance of a pair of 50 cal machine-guns exiting the middle of the crossways muffler under the back?) - but I digress

The comment had been to the effect that "when these trailers were developed" or similar wording that I do not have in front of me now - Pickups were worktrucks and vans etc were not common either - that it was CARS that towed them. I agree. Cars towed them. And in the 60's and 70's very few of those cars were unibody cars, virtually all were rear wheel drive, and the most commonly encountered cars were large body-on-frame sedans , most commonly with a V8. Think Ford Galaxie, Plymouth Fury, Dodge Polara, Chev Biscayne & Caprice, Pontiac Parisienne or Catalina etc. The (not so common) unibody cars were still rear wheel drive - the Valiant comes to mind. The very few front-wheel drives were huge V8's - Olds Toronado, Cadillac ElDorado. It was not until 1978 that domestic makers began to downsize in any serious fashion, and begin to use fwd and unibody as a common build practice.

Yes, I know, some imports were unibody long before 1978.

Circa mid-60's VWs barely had enough power to get up a hill solo, never mind tow anything. My '63 (university commuter) could not hold 65 mph on level ground. It went like H*** in first & second - was a terror at the stoplights - but it wasn't really safe to drive on the highways around Winnipeg - where the Boler was born and where traffic generally moved at a cool, calm and relaxed 70-80 mph.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:44 PM   #157
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Name: George
Trailer: Waiting for the Sprinter van and designing the converion modules.
Oregon
Posts: 629
The car which I did not see in Fiberglass TV discussions is Volvo S60 with 3,307lb towing capacity. New one costs over $31K.

The All-New 2012 Volvo S60 Sedan

Since 2010 Volvo is owned by a Chinese company so they will likely stop utilizing Fordís components soon and God knows what will happen with prices. Perhaps Harbor Freight will start carrying Volvo replacement parts.

George.
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Old 03-13-2012, 09:53 PM   #158
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Name: John
Trailer: 1985 Scamp 16, 2013 VW Tiguan SEL
Colorado
Posts: 153
What's this "unibody" problem?

Concerns about the lack of proper body-on-frame construction keep cropping up here. OK, educate me. Has anybody experienced structural failure of a unibody car towing an egg trailer? No?

I believe some of you have an outdated view of vehicle design, as obsolete as an aging exhibit I saw in the Detroit Museum of "How a Car is Made." You can watch as the body shell of an '80s Impala is lowered onto its frame. Today, that's how a truck is made. Trucks are necessary for many heavy duties, but IMHO, not for towing a fiberglass trailer.

Let's look at unibody SUVs, like the VW Toureg. The tow rating, with TDI engine, is 7700 lbs. It could tow my Scamp 16 three times over, if that were any kind of a practical setup. Should the lack of discrete frame rails running from bumper to bumper cause me to fear towing a class of trailer that tops out at half the tow rating?

My Forester has shown limitations in the tongue weight I can use, but it's never creaked or groaned, let alone broken in half. So I'd say that rear suspensions are the critical limit, not frame strength.
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:07 PM   #159
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Name: George
Trailer: Waiting for the Sprinter van and designing the converion modules.
Oregon
Posts: 629
Quote:
Originally Posted by John McMillin View Post
Concerns about the lack of proper body-on-frame construction keep cropping up here. OK, educate me. Has anybody experienced structural failure of a unibody car towing an egg trailer? No?

I believe some of you have an outdated view of vehicle design, as obsolete as an aging exhibit I saw in the Detroit Museum of "How a Car is Made." You can watch as the body shell of an '80s Impala is lowered onto its frame. Today, that's how a truck is made. Trucks are necessary for many heavy duties, but IMHO, not for towing a fiberglass trailer.

Let's look at unibody SUVs, like the VW Toureg. The tow rating, with TDI engine, is 7700 lbs. It could tow my Scamp 16 three times over, if that were any kind of a practical setup. Should the lack of discrete frame rails running from bumper to bumper cause me to fear towing a class of trailer that tops out at half the tow rating?

My Forester has shown limitations in the tongue weight I can use, but it's never creaked or groaned, let alone broken in half. So I'd say that rear suspensions are the critical limit, not frame strength.
Unibody issue is if you plan to use weight distribution system. Attachment of WD hitch to unibody sheet metal and unibody strength in the load for which they were not design for would likely be key issue. Without WD system there should be no difference in reliability of towing with unibody or framed design.
George.
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