What can my Highlander pull? - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-15-2011, 06:56 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: Sandy
Trailer: In the market
Missouri
Posts: 1
What can my Highlander pull?

I have a 2006 V6 Highlander Limited edition with towing package. Manual says the GVWR is 3500 pounds. I don't know how to determine what I can pull. I know it will need to be a light weight trailer, but how light? Do I go by the trailer dry weight; hitch or axle weight? I'm so confused and would appreciate advice from you seasoned campers! Please feel free to email me at sgregg@sbcglobal.net.
__________________

__________________
Sandy G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2011, 08:06 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,142
You don't want the total (loaded with gear) trailer weight to exceed 3500 lbs. And you don't want the hitch weight (again when loaded) to exceed 350 lbs, if I understand your vehicle correctly. If you get a 13' fiberglass egg you most likely will be in great shape on both counts. 16 footers will be ok on the total weight, but tongue weight could be iffy depending on how the trailers are configured and loaded up.
__________________

__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2011, 09:39 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Anne H's Avatar
 
Name: Anne
Trailer: Escape 17 ft 2006 / 2005 Honda Pilot
Oregon
Posts: 465
Registry
Hi Sandy,
I've been towing a 17' Escape with no problems with my Honda Pilot (also rated at 3500 pounds). I looked at the trailer dry weight, added weight for full water and propane tanks and several hundred pounds for gear - I think I could carry a baby elephant and still be OK ().

Good Luck!
__________________
Anne H and Fay Wray, the cat | Portland, OR
en Plein Air (2016 19' Escape; 2016 Honda Pilot )
http://rightbrainrightlane.blogspot.com/
Anne H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2011, 11:09 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anne H View Post
Hi Sandy,
I've been towing a 17' Escape with no problems with my Honda Pilot (also rated at 3500 pounds). I looked at the trailer dry weight, added weight for full water and propane tanks and several hundred pounds for gear - I think I could carry a baby elephant and still be OK ().

Good Luck!
Anne, that is a very good trailer for an illustration of how actual trailer weights may relate to manufacturer's "dry weight" figures. From the Escapetrailer.com website we see this:

17 Foot Escape Spesifications
Total length 17'-8"
Body length 13'-8"
Total height 8'-1"
Exterior width 6'-8" Approx.
Dry hitch weight 250 lbs Approx.
Dry axle weight 1650 lbs Approx.
Total dry weight 1900 lbs (Plan A)
2100 lbs (Plan B
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating 3500 lbs

Now if we look at some actual weigh-in results from here:
Trailer Weights in the Real World
We see four different 17' Escapes that weighed between 2660 lbs and 3340 lbs. And they had actual hitch weights 320, 340, 380, and (gulp!) 500 lbs. The basic trailer itself is the same, Escape floorplan B, yet the way the owners load them affected tongue weights greatly. It was noted that the 500-pounder had a full fresh water tank, and 20 gallons at 8.3 lbs per gallon is 166 lbs... most of that weight falling on the tongue when the tank is in the trailer's front end, but some of it on the trailer's axle. If the hot water heater is up front as well, that holds another 6 gallons.

The Escape is a very good candidate for towing with a vehicle rated for 3500 lbs. But as with any trailer, the owner will still have to pay attention to how the trailer is packed and filled. It's pretty difficult to achieve a tongue weight greater than 350 lbs on a 13'er, but I suspect it could happen... maybe dual propane tanks and a generator on the tongue would do it?
__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 12:00 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Francesca Knowles's Avatar
 
Name: Francesca Knowles
Trailer: '78 Trillium 4500
Jefferson County, Washington State, U.S.A.
Posts: 4,543
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandy G View Post
I have a 2006 V6 Highlander Limited edition with towing package. Manual says the GVWR is 3500 pounds. I don't know how to determine what I can pull. I know it will need to be a light weight trailer, but how light? Do I go by the trailer dry weight; hitch or axle weight? I'm so confused and would appreciate advice from you seasoned campers! Please feel free to email me at sgregg@sbcglobal.net.
According to mfr.'s specs as given at http://www.livinlite.com/pdf/2006%20tow%20ratings.pdf
the TOTAL tow limit for your vehicle is 3500 lbs. That includes any cargo you add to the trailer.
Refer to your owner's manual for tongue weight limits, and be aware that tongue weights given by trailer makers do NOT include the weight of any batteries, propane tanks, etc. that you may want to carry on the tongue.
Also check with your insurance carrier. You may be uninsured if you are in an accident while towing a trailer heavier than allowed by the tow vehicle's manufacturer, (see "abuse/neglect" clauses in auto policies)
__________________
Francesca Knowles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 06:07 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
DonDeutsch's Avatar
 
Trailer: Cloud 13 ft and Compact Jr
Minnesota
Posts: 328
Tounge weight is not a huge factor as long as you can live with a weight distibuting hitch. I have had a WDH and I personally prefer to avoid the need to have one.
__________________
DonDeutsch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 09:53 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Greg H's Avatar
 
Name: Greg
Trailer: 72 Boler American
Indiana
Posts: 1,557
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDeutsch View Post
Tounge weight is not a huge factor as long as you can live with a weight distibuting hitch. I have had a WDH and I personally prefer to avoid the need to have one.
Most Toyota manuals say not to use a WDH. Sandy should look at the towing section in her manual, It most likely says 3,500 max, 350 tongue, and Toyota does not recommend using a WDH.
__________________
Greg H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 03:33 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Francesca Knowles's Avatar
 
Name: Francesca Knowles
Trailer: '78 Trillium 4500
Jefferson County, Washington State, U.S.A.
Posts: 4,543
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDeutsch View Post
Tounge weight is not a huge factor as long as you can live with a weight distibuting hitch. I have had a WDH and I personally prefer to avoid the need to have one.
Weight distributing hitches do NOT eliminate the necessity to adhere to recommended tongue weight limits.
There's a very comprehensive explanation of how w.d.h.'s work at RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Towing: Weight Distribution (WD) Hitch --- How it Works which includes the following language:
"Note - When the WD system is engaged the actual tongue weight does not change. Recommended tongue weight is from 10% to 15%."

Furthermore, the substantial increase in weight of a w.d.h. itself must also be taken into consideration when calculating loads tolerable by the tow vehicle.

NEW EDIT:
Don quite rightly pointed out that the closed thread at the Open Roads forum has a lot of confusing responses in it, so here's the administrator's nutshell explanation I refer to above:

BEGIN QUOTE FROM OPEN ROADS FORUM:
"Edited 9/14/04: A summary of the 150+ posts in this topic has been developed by several of the contributors to explain WHY a weight distribution system might be necessary and WHAT a WD system does to improve a rig's handling:

Without a WD system, the tow vehicle's rear axle load could significantly increase due to leveraging of the tongue weight. Conversely the front axle load will be decreased. These axle load changes will make most tow vehicles unlevel. The decreased load on the front axle can cause a loss of steering control and braking difficulties. The increased rear axle load might exceed that axle's rating, and the load on the receiver might exceed its rating.

A weight distribution system enables a tow vehicle to more effectively handle the tongue weight of a trailer by removing some of the load from the tow vehicle's rear axle and distributing it to the tow vehicle's front axle and the trailer's axle(s). Note - When the WD system is engaged the actual tongue weight does not change. Recommended tongue weight is from 10% to 15%.

Consult your owner’s manual to determine if your vehicle is suited for a WD system.

Several recent posts have discussed WD hitches. One member stopped using his because he felt it was contributing to sway by decreasing the "tongue weight". I hope the following will give a better idea of what the WD hitch does and does not. Questions and comments are welcome.
* image not shown due to your preference setting *
Example assumptions:
TV wheelbase = 130”
TV rear axle to ball coupler = 65”
Ball coupler to TT axles = 200”
WD spring bar length = 30”
WD spring bar rear end load = 1000 lbs/bar = 2000 lbs total

How the WD hitch works:

Spring bar tensioner pulls UP on rear end of bar and DOWN on TT tongue. DOWN force of 2000 lbs on TT tongue adds a load of 300 lbs at TT axles.
This is calculated using ball coupler as the fulcrum: 2000x30/200 = 300.

Now, having added a load of 300 lbs at the TT axles, we must balance the TV/TT teeter totter. Using the TV’s rear axle as the fulcrum, to balance the 300 lbs at the TT’s axles we must add some load at the TV’s front axle.
The lever arm from the rear axle to front axle is 130”. The lever arm from the rear axle to the TT axles is 65+200 = 265”.
The required balancing load at the front axle is 300x265/130 = 611.54 lbs.

Or, we can calculate the reaction at the TV’s rear axle by treating the TV/TT as a lever with the fulcrum at the TV’s front axle.
The lever arm for the 300 lbs at the TT’s axles is 130+65+200 = 395”.
The lever arm for the rear axle is the wheelbase = 130”.
Since the TT axles are “lifting up” with a force of 300 lbs, this translates to an “uplift” at the rear axle equal to 300*395/130 = 911.54 lbs.

Summary of axle load changes:
TV front axle 611.54 lbs ADDED
TV rear axle 911.54 lbs REMOVED
TT axles 300.00 lbs ADDED

Now it is interesting to consider what happens at the hitch.

DOWN force of 2000 lbs on TT tongue adds a load of 1700 lbs at ball coupler.
This is calculated using TT axles as the fulcrum: 2000x170/200 = 1700.

The UP force of 2000 lbs on the rear ends of the spring bars produces an UP force of 2000 lbs at the hitch end of the spring bars.
The UP force of 2000 lbs minus the DOWN force of 1700 lbs on the ball gives a net UP force of 300 lbs at the hitch.
The vertical load on the receiver has been reduced by 300 lbs.
The vertical load transmitted through the ball has been increased by 1700 lbs.

It is interesting to note that TT weight and “tongue weight” do not enter into these calculations. The WD hitch does not distribute “tongue weight”. It simply removes load from the TV’s rear axle and distributes it to the TV’s front axle and the TT’s axles.

* This post was last edited 11/08/09 04:32pm by an administrator/moderator * "
END QUOTE FROM OPEN ROADS FORUM
__________________
Francesca Knowles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 07:39 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
DonDeutsch's Avatar
 
Trailer: Cloud 13 ft and Compact Jr
Minnesota
Posts: 328
Wow, I am amazed at the very complete response, and yes I do have to agree!
__________________
DonDeutsch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2011, 03:04 PM   #10
Member
 
RichardinBC's Avatar
 
Name: Richard
Trailer: 13' Trillium
British Columbia
Posts: 29
towing with highlander

Hi sandy, I tow with a 2004 highlander 7 passenger. I do not have a tow package but did have a factory hitch in stalled when I bought the highlander used from a dealer.

The Highlander is a car base, a Camry. It does not have springs but uses McPherson struts for its suspension, which gives it the good ride.

I bought 13" Trillium which I thought would be no problem for the Highlander, but when I towed it home the trailer really sat down the back of the Highlander because of high tongue weight. When we went camping I loaded to to decreace tongue weight but it was not enough to level out trailer and car.

There is nothing that you can do to raise the back end of the highlander and I already have the strongest struts on it. So a WDH was the only was to go. The trailer already had some parts on it so a WDH had been used before but not by the person I bought it from.

One of the things I liked about the trailer was that frame had been beefed up but that had added tongue weight.

When I came back from camping I had car and trailer weighted and the Highlander was 4300lb and the trailer 1740lb. Do not know tougue weight but it is in the 200lb area maybe more.

I towed it to Arizona last fall and I could not have been happier with the way trailer towed and handled. Do not sweit about if you are to use a WDH or not. I did have electric brakes installed. I took my setup to my dealer the service guy said no problem, just get your transmission serviced and you are good to go. No problem using overdrive as well, some transmissions need OD turned off if you are towing.

I hope this helps.

Richard
__________________
RichardinBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2011, 03:43 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
honda03842's Avatar
 
Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
Posts: 7,300
Richard,
It's easy to weigh your tongue. Use a 'seperate jack' to lift the tongue's jack off the ground and place a bathroom scale under the tongue"s jack, lower your 'seperate jack'. I place a small board on the bathroom scale to protect it and to distribute the force. Once on the scale, use the trailer's jack to level the trailer.

I'm actually surprised that a 13 footer can upset the balance of your Highlander, A heavier Casita 16 has no significant effect onour Honda CRV.

What is the distance of your ball to your rear axle? Maybe that's it.

Norm
__________________
honda03842 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2011, 04:38 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 2009 Scamp 16 ft / 2003 Durango
Posts: 692
Why use two jacks ?

Just put the tongue on the TV raise the jack and slide the scale under the jack and then raise the tongue off of the TV.

Bill K


Quote:
Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
Richard,
It's easy to weigh your tongue. Use a 'seperate jack' to lift the tongue's jack off the ground and place a bathroom scale under the tongue"s jack, lower your 'seperate jack'. I place a small board on the bathroom scale to protect it and to distribute the force. Once on the scale, use the trailer's jack to level the trailer.

I'm actually surprised that a 13 footer can upset the balance of your Highlander, A heavier Casita 16 has no significant effect onour Honda CRV.

What is the distance of your ball to your rear axle? Maybe that's it.

Norm
__________________
Bill K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2011, 05:55 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
honda03842's Avatar
 
Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
Posts: 7,300
Sounds great Bill.
__________________
honda03842 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2011, 09:14 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
honda03842's Avatar
 
Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
Posts: 7,300
Richard, I received a private email stating the best way to measure is to not put a scale under the jack, but rather to weigh at the ball coupler. This is obviously correct and gives the true weight on the ball.

I tried this technique and the ball weight was 10% less.

I placed a mechanical scales under the coupler, placed my bottle jack on the scales, aligned it under the front edge of the coupler, jacked it up until it just relieved the load on the trailers front jack and took a scale reading.

Norm
__________________

__________________
honda03842 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hybrid Highlander for lightweight towing Ben Kadas Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 8 07-23-2010 04:20 PM
FS: 1972 Serro Scotty Highlander Heathc Classified Archives 0 08-10-2009 10:13 PM
Electric Brakes w/ '09 Highlander?? Jaclyn W Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 5 04-26-2009 05:10 PM
2008 Toyota Highlander Brian B-P General Chat 0 07-31-2007 06:06 PM
Highlander Hybrid Brake Controller ... Tim Garriock Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 5 07-28-2007 11:52 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.