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Old 10-16-2011, 09:28 AM   #1
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Books

A member suggested Ginny and I read Julie and Romeo by Jeanne Ray.

This is a marvelous book that will keep you laughing and at the same time remind you of many life lessons. It's an amazingly quick read that will lift your heart and recognize many of life's realities.

If you are 60 years old or approaching that age you will not be able to put this book down and will be recommending it to others as we have.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:40 PM   #2
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Newfoundland

Newfoundland is my favorite destination and we'll probably be returning next year. I've read a number of books on Newfoundland. This year a park neighbor from Newfoundland lent me a marvelous book, Latitude of Melt by Joan Clark.

This book describes the essence of Newfoundland and is well worth the read if you plan a visit. Places described are real and so are the people.

Latitude of Melt refers to the 1000's of icebergs that melt at this latitude, well worth a May/June visit to this marvelously interesting island.
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:38 PM   #3
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On my bucket list is a visit to L'Anse aux Meadows and the Viking settlement. Is it mentioned in the book?
Sherry

Oh, and have you been there? If you have, I'm jealous..
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:22 PM   #4
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Smile L'Anse aux Meadows

L'Anse aux Meadows, I have been there. Go! The whole Northern Peninsula is a good trip. Good campground a few miles before St Anthony. St. Anthony has some very good museums that give you a real feel about how hard life was back then. Lots of walking trails. Road side gardens are all over the place as are the moose. Icebergs off the coast. Good lobster if in season.
Many many beautiful coastal views and picturesque villages. Make sure to see Gros Morne and do not miss the tour of Western Brook Pond, it is well worth the money. Go for the early morning run or the later afternoon run. Good camp ground in Rocky Harbour. Again lots to see around that area. I could go on and on but... Just go you will not regret it. In Newfoundland do not be afraid to get off of the beaten track, that is where you will find the really interesting stuff.

Be prepared for wind, wet, cool weather as well as sunny days.

Sandy C
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:24 PM   #5
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The Meadows

The book is really good at describing the people and country but does not mention the meadows. It takes place on the Avalon penisula well south of St Johns.

We have been to L'Anse aux Meadows. It is well worth the visit. They have staff dressed like Viking men and women and tell the story of the time. It is extremely well done. The best time to go is mid may thru June. Nearby St Anthony's is a great place to see icebergs, worth the trip alone.

If you drive by L'Anse to the end of the road, just a few miles, you come to one of Canada's best restuarants, the Norseman. It is run during the summer by a young couple from St Johns. The food is great and not too expensive. We stay in the area for at least two days simply so we can eat their twice. We have had caribou there as well. Everything is great. As well Annie Proulx's book Shipping News was written nearby.

We also hike in the area up the hill at the east end of town. We have spoken to the locals and understand the harbor freezes in the winter and polar bears can be seen walking across the ice.....

The following is from our Labrador newsletter.

Rural and Surprising
Saturday, May 31, 2008

Newfoundland is rural beyond imagination. The town that contains LíAnse aux Meadows, the famous Viking site that is a World Heritage Center, has a population of 32 people. The owner of the restaurant mentioned that half the 32 are older than 70, the young are moving to mineral rich, high paying areas and soon these little Ďout portsí will be no more.

In this town is one of Canadaís finest restaurants, the Norseman. We have now eaten there 6 times, every time has been a delight.

The food is marvelous and the owners as nice. We were surprised the first time we came to find Starbucks coffee. Tonight I had Roasted True Cod oven baked with tomato gratin, pancetta & baby spinach with a pine nut relish. It came with three types of small potatoes, one purple, asparagus and marvelous carrots. Ginny had Crispy Chicken pan roasted with herbs glazed with honey, lime and chilies. We topped it off with partridge berry pie, vanilla ice cream and lemon sauce. (Partridge berries are red/purple and bakeapple berries are yellow. both great.)

Yesterdays lunch was a Fish Chowder with Saffron, a light cream based fish chowder with Atlantic Salmon and Cod with a Warm Salad of seared scallops in a walnut vinaigrette topped with Canadian bacon on a bed of spinach.

One of the most interesting items on the menu was Macaroni and Cheese, butter poached lobster with creamy lobster broth and mascarpone enriched orzo. I never eat Mac and Cheese but this could be an exception.

The view from the restaurant. (Picture at bottom)

No we are not suffering in Newfoundland.

I absolutely need to get back to Newfoundland
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:31 PM   #6
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SherrynPaul,

Ditto on everything Sandy C. said. I could talk for days and days about Newfoundland (and Labrador). We have been four times. Gros Morne is a great place to visit and Western Brook Pond is worthe the hike out.

Newfoundland has great geology and worth investigating. There's so much to see it's easily a 2 month visit. I love it to death. I think it's better than Alaska, particularly in the spring.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:54 PM   #7
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Don't know if it's any good yet but Just started reading Bay of spirits by Farley Mowat
it's non fiction.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:54 PM   #8
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I spent 2 weeks camping in Gros Morne in September and can't wait to go back. The wildlife photography was terrific.
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Old 12-30-2011, 09:33 PM   #9
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Oh, Norm, so that's what you look like without your hat. I wouldn't have recognized you!
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Old 12-31-2011, 08:22 AM   #10
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Recognized

Mike,

As well as losing my hat, I've lost my beard. I said to Ginny last night that I need to grow it again for Newfoundland.

I've read a lot of Farley Mowat and do enjoy his books.

Another one of Canada's top restuarants is located in Cornerbrook, Newfoundland, though we like to hunt out unique places, we are equally thrilled to eat seafood all through Newfoundland.

At the end south end of the shore road in Gros Morne's Rocky Harbor is a seafood market. You can order excellent cooked Newfoundland lobster to go there.

Newfoundland has wonderful Geology. Newfoundland was once physically attached to Europe near the beginning of the Avalon Penisula (St Johns). The connection point is a valley that crosses the beginning of the penisula and clearly shows where European portion connected to the North American portion.

Sandy Christe mentioned the road side (literally roadside, you see them along all the highways). gardens. We stopped to speak with two gardeners. to understand the process and yields. The following is from our trips.


Red Bay
Thursday, June 05, 2008

Today we moved 24 miles up the road to Red Bay, population 211, the last town on the paved portion of the road.

First Picture. Pinware River Gorge on the way to Red Bay.

There are many things to like about Newfoundland and Labrador. It is beautiful, quiet and relaxing but very interesting to me is the apparent self sufficiency of the locals. This time of the year you see them planting their root crops in their roadside gardens; cutting their firewood on what appears to be common or provincial property.

The little roadside gardens typically no more than 60 by 30 feet in size seem to be well tended, the soil hauled in, built up with seaweed and sawdust.

We stopped at a garden near Red Bay and talked to the owner; it was formerly her uncleís who still plants a row or two. This small plot produces twenty 50 pound bags of potatoes a year. She planted the potato mounds this week and will be eating potatoes by early August. In addition she plants the remaining root crops of Labrador plus cabbage.

The only problem they seem to have is with mice that will eat the seed potatoes. Their home grown solution is to implant little pails between the rows and half fill them with water, by the way no hose here, they walk down to the stream and bring it back by the bucket. The mice fall in and drown. No complex solutions here, simply a couple of 12 hour days to prepare and plant the garden and again twenty 50 pound bags. Thereís no starving here, plant your potatoes, shot a moose or catch a cod.

Picture 3. Mouse trap.

You also see the self sufficiency in other ways, people fixing their cars in their front yards, the huge piles of firewood cut and stacked for the coming year, in yards and like the roadside plots along all the roads. You see it in the foods, home baked breads, pies and biscuits, and Iím particularly addicted to their tea biscuits, and their collecting of local berries, partridge berries, a sweet cranberry looking berry, my favorite, and bakeapple berries, almost citrus tart.

Overlooking famous Red Bay; they get 9,000 tourists a year, mostly during the summer.

A researcher, reading wills in the Basque region of Spain discovered that Basque whalers hunted whales here beginning in 1515 or so and that a 1000 or so Basque whalers came here every year, 5 times the present population. Further research showed that one of their ships had sunk in Red Bay.

Red Bay was conveniently located for whaling and offered a well protected harbor, Saddle Back island protects most of the harbor except in a sever storm.

It turns out that a vessel and crew could be out fitted for 5000 ducats and after a year of whaling return 100,000 ducats, an amazing gain. Apparently whale oil was the petroleum of the period, particularly for lighting but also with other industrial uses.

Picture 4. Our site overlooking the bay. Labrador entrepreneurial-ism at work, 4 RV spots next to a one pump gas station/convenience store overlooking the harbor at Red Bay

Itís so beautiful here that we decided to spend a couple of days here before we begin the first portion of towing on gravel. We drove a couple miles down the gravel portion as a test and it seemed fine though I expect a slow pace is in order for us, though the one other car we saw blasted by us at least twice our rate of speed. I must say that we have already driven the Honda on numerous dirt roads. Actually the only error I seemed to make in our budgeting for the trip was to not include mileage driven while not towing. So far itís been almost equal to the towing mileage.

Picture 5. The road before us, the next 1000 miles

Love to all,


Norm and Ginny
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lab3.jpg   Lab4.jpg  

lab5.jpg  
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Old 01-06-2012, 06:11 PM   #11
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I just got Latitude of Melt, and have ordered a few other books on Newfoundland.
Norm and Ginny, I think Partridgeberries are like (or are) lingonberries, and bakeapple berries are (or a variant) of molter/cloudberries, which I dearly love. I didn't even know that cloudberries grew on this side of the Atlantic. They're a national treasure in Norway.
Sigh. Yet another reason to go to Newfoundland. I'll now have to time the trip with bakeapple berry season. Amazing! And thank you.
Sherry
PS Your photos are amazing, and appreciated.
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Old 01-06-2012, 06:54 PM   #12
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Newfoundland berries

I just got Latitude of Melt, and have ordered a few other books on Newfoundland.
Norm and Ginny, I think Partridgeberries are like (or are) lingonberries, and bakeapple berries are (or a variant) of molter/cloudberries, which I dearly love. I didn't even know that cloudberries grew on this side of the Atlantic. They're a national treasure in Norway.
Sigh. Yet another reason to go to Newfoundland. I'll now have to time the trip with bakeapple berry season. Amazing! And thank you.
Sherry
PS Your photos are amazing, and appreciated.

Sherry,

Thanks for the berry lesson, you are absolutely correct. I may have mentioned it, but Eastern Newfoundland was once a part of Europe. It makes sense they would have berries in common.

When you get to Newfoundland, minimally take the short ferry hop over to Labrador and drive the paved road to Red Bay. On our second trip to Newfoundland we left the motorhome in Newfoundland and stayed in a B&B in Labrador. The wife there baked bread and had jams made from both berries. The husband was a cod fisherman and had his potato patch as well.

We plan to return with the Scamp and head down to Cape Race from 'Latitudes" before heading across Labrador again...

Safe travels

P.S. Newfoundland and Labrador are a little larger than Norway with an 1/8th the population and half of the population lives 'in' St Johns
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Old 01-06-2012, 09:15 PM   #13
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Okay, Norm and Ginny, since we've totally gone off the topic of books...
A few years ago we met a firefighter from the Toronto area in a Nova Scotia campground. He talked a lot about deer flies and mosquitoes being a huge problem in Labrador and Newfoundland during his hunting trips.
Did you experience many problems in your visits?
Sherry
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Old 01-07-2012, 11:49 AM   #14
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Bugs in Labrador

Sherry,

We've been to Labrador twice and Newfoundland 4 times. We usually arrive in May and leave in early July. Bugs have never been an issue. It may be that it's the time of the year, the temperature or the breezes.

We have also gone to Newfoundland in September and again bugs were not an issue.

In Newfoundland we have done a lot of hiking about, mostly short trails but a lot of them and all without bites.

We do work to protect our trailer from mosquito night time intrusion by mosquitos where ever we are. This includes installing screens on all possible entry points like the back of vents and the like.

There are so many places that I feel I could stay in forever, places with names like Hearts Desire. They simply make you want to stay and have a fish dinner, a partridge berry desert and a cup of tea.

We choose May and June so we can see the Icebergs. It means we occasionally see snow on higher elevations or at "shadowed" spots.

In Newfoundland it's important to investigate as many small towns and villages as possible. They all seem to have an interesting trail or little museum. Except for the area south of St John we have driven most of them. Next time we'll investigate the area of the book "Latitudes". We have an Escapee across the street from that area.

You must understand that I like the rural and quiet and most of Newfoundland is that way. You may have seen the following pictures but here's a Berg and some Labrador snow.

Though it was cool and often breezy we brought no winter clothing. We carry a wind breaker/light rain coat and various sweaterhs and turtle necks. We tend to layer so we can take them off as we go during the day. If you like I can send som information about our trip. If you want some send me a PM with your email address.
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