Calling all ham radio people – HF op in a Scamp? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-01-2015, 07:27 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Name: Frank
Trailer: Casita
California
Posts: 251
Scamp and Ham

We should start a Scamp n Ham group maybe??
__________________

__________________
Frank F
frankcfx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 07:36 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
Posts: 1,045
Perhaps a less exclusive Ham and Eggs?
Or if the RV is painted Green Eggs and Hams.
__________________

__________________
redbarron55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 07:39 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Name: Frank
Trailer: Casita
California
Posts: 251
Ham in Eggs

Great redbarron55,
__________________
Frank F
frankcfx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 07:04 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 1,885
OK lots of great comments! Let me address a few of them and then tell you what I will be looking for at the hamfest this weekend.

@ Byron: At first glance the PAR EndFedz end-fed wire looks interesting, but they are mono-band. And, outside of maybe more flexibility in how they are erected, they seem to be about the same as a dipole. I need to research these more.

@ Elizabeth: Yes I see the Versa-Tenna is similar to the PAR EndFedz that Byron uses. The hamstick is interesting but again monoband. I expect to be on 20 meters most often, but I would prefer the option of trying out a few other bands without having to buy more and re-configuring. I am considering a monoband wire antenna and it could be hard to find places to anchor the ends and the hamstick would solve that problem. It would also be out of reach to other campers and therefore safer. If horizontal and on the hitch receiver mounted mast, it could also be rotated to take advantage of the directional characteristics of a dipole. Did you run it vertical or horizontal? PS for Elizabeth, I’m still 23 days from getting my camper myself, and might not get the radio running in it for some months, but remind me and I will be sure and let you know what I do and how it works for me.

@ jaevans: I do like the idea of your inverted V with ladder line although I think for convenience I would cut it for 20 meters (and give up using 40, at least for now). I believe what you are talking about is what ARRL describes it as a “center-fed Zepp,” “tuned doublet” and “dipole with tuned feeders” in this article. From what I read about this type of antenna, the impedance varies depending on how it is installed, and distance from ground, so a 4:1 balun usually works but if the impendence is off too much then a different ratio balun should be used. Since the campsites would vary, the effectiveness of the antenna and a 4:1 balun might also. This sounds like a good idea for future experimentation from the trailer. It is similar to my G5RV that I just put up at home. It was meant to be temporary but its working very well (13 countries in a week without really trying). Not as well as the tri-band beam at 50 feet I used to have at the same QTH, but still quite well.

@Greg: Spoke to your RF Engineer guy this morning, thanks for the reference. His advice was pretty consistent with everything here except he was not a fan of the end-fed antennas, or running a dipole in vertical config. He also seemed to think that coax was better than ladder line for portable, temporary setups.

@Frank Fox: I had not thought of using the belly band for a mount. How does that work for you? What is the effect of having the antenna there? A photo would be nice too.

@ Mike, K5NAN: Ahhh JT9! This is something that intrigues me. Years ago, I ran packet on 2M and also a little RTTY on HF, both with one of the early TNCs. JT9 was not around then. The digital modes have always interested me but they are so limited, at least when compared to the vast amount of data on the internet. Nevertheless, this is where Amateur radio has the potential to shine. The original mandate for Amateur radio to provide a pool of trained communications specialist for emergencies seems to be lost in this age of the Internet and 4g, but perhaps digital modes used by hams can provide some redundancy for the Internet, when the inevitable worldwide disruptions occur. The idea of effective digital communication over hundreds or thousands of miles with only five watts or so is amazing and I will be interested to see if it goes beyond the basic information exchange to the passing of potentially important and more lengthy messages.

@John, WD5IKX: On your QRZ page I see your bugcatcher and vertical with 8 radials but not sure I see what you described. In any case, lots of wires and antenna on the ground, or even just a 50 ft counterpoise, might not work at most campsites. If you have the area to set it all up, those are impressive antenna and results.

@redbarron55: Well you beat me to the punch. I was going to ask if anyone had laid claim to the name for their trailer of “The Hammin Egg.” I don’t want to steal the name and I have seen similar references, so if that’s the name of your camper, speak now

So where am I with this now?


Right now, I am leaning toward a monoband hamstick style dipole on a mast to start with. Depending on how that works, and my desire to use other bands if they are active, I can then get additional elements or I can try one of the other antennas such as the end fed, and inverted V dipole or maybe the zepp style multiband.

One of the most important deciding factors for me will involve the mast because I very much want to avoid using guys. Since I am have not done this before, I have to ask is it practical to mount a hamstick or buddiepole dipole on a hitch receiver mounted mast at least 12-15 feet high, without guying and with only a supporting bracket to the spare tire? Also would a mast bracket on the spare tire carrier require reinforcement? BTW, I would only use it with calm weather. If guys are going to be needed anyway, I might as well just use an inverted-V and save some money. Perhaps this one from MFJ would be good for a 20M antenna.

I see some people use hitch receiver flag mast mounts but I wonder if the tiltnraise mast mount is worth the extra money. I see you can also spend even more than that if you want.

BTW, I stumbled across this article that seems to echo some of the suggestions in this thread. I like it because its an easy read.

I’m going to stay away from the battery discussion for now.. when chasing DX its 99.9% listening. Even at 100 watts, just saying “59 North Carolina” won’t use much battery juice. Besides I expect to be on shore power more often than not, at least for a while.

__________________
gordon2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 07:47 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
minke's Avatar
 
Name: alan
Trailer: looking
Colorado
Posts: 144
Depending on what your tow vehicle is perhaps you could consider a mobile antenna on it with coax back to the trailer. Then a screwdriver or other antenna could provide multi-band abilities.

For me installing an antenna means drilling a ¾" hole in the roof and filling it with an NMO mount.
__________________
minke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 07:53 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 1,885
Quote:
Originally Posted by minke View Post
Depending on what your tow vehicle is perhaps you could consider a mobile antenna on it with coax back to the trailer. Then a screwdriver or other antenna could provide multi-band abilities.

For me installing an antenna means drilling a ¾" hole in the roof and filling it with an NMO mount.
That indeed was something I thought about but the tug is only 8 months old so I am not quite ready to drill holes in it. But that might be exactly what I do eventually.
__________________
gordon2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 08:00 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
minke's Avatar
 
Name: alan
Trailer: looking
Colorado
Posts: 144
For VHF & UHF that can't be beat, but I'm told that an aluminum bracket between the fender and the hood can come close. On my '11 F-250 I was frightened of the airbags so I had a commercial radio shop do the work. Next time I'd do it myself again.
__________________
minke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 08:28 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 6,307
Registry
As far as guying is concerned. I rarely need guying. I have a Buddie Pole that I've used in the past, but it takes up a lot more room than EndFEDZ. The Buddie Pole with the standard mast doesn't need to be guyed unless there's a lot of wind. Even with taller mast the tripod seems to hold it pretty well, winds can change that pretty fast.

The fiberglass poles I use for antenna supports are designed for wind things at top. With the 3' fence post and two bungie cords every thing stays put. I put a little tension on the antenna with causes a bit of a bend in top of the fiberglass pole. It's been up in some pretty strong winds at Padre Island and again in Death Valley. That's my experiences.
As far as performance the Buddie Pole has out performed the EndFEDZ. I've made some really long range contacts with Buddie Pole at the standard 12' above the ground. The problem is getting it tuned, even with a tuner it's best to get it close.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 08:32 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 6,307
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by minke View Post
For VHF & UHF that can't be beat, but I'm told that an aluminum bracket between the fender and the hood can come close. On my '11 F-250 I was frightened of the airbags so I had a commercial radio shop do the work. Next time I'd do it myself again.
For UHF VHF I just take the control head off my FT8800 and use the extension cable along with a remote speaker. I just have to watch the truck battery.

I would recommend using a separate battery for your hf radio.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 10:37 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
minke's Avatar
 
Name: alan
Trailer: looking
Colorado
Posts: 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
For UHF VHF I just take the control head off my FT8800 and use the extension cable along with a remote speaker. I just have to watch the truck battery.

I would recommend using a separate battery for your hf radio.
I think one or more of us has a misunderstanding. I don't think that the control head has the SO-239 to connect to the antenna.

Currently all I run in my truck is an FT1DR for APRS and it has an alarm for NOAA weather alerts. Folks on the east coast where I travel regularly don't understand why I use a ¼λ antenna. I live at an altitude of >6,000 feet above sea level and enough repeaters are ~8,000 feet higher. Gain would be an impediment. Next time I'm on the east coast I'll try to remember a gain antenna.
__________________
minke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 02:04 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 6,307
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by minke View Post
I think one or more of us has a misunderstanding. I don't think that the control head has the SO-239 to connect to the antenna.

Currently all I run in my truck is an FT1DR for APRS and it has an alarm for NOAA weather alerts. Folks on the east coast where I travel regularly don't understand why I use a ¼λ antenna. I live at an altitude of >6,000 feet above sea level and enough repeaters are ~8,000 feet higher. Gain would be an impediment. Next time I'm on the east coast I'll try to remember a gain antenna.

The antenna is mounted on the truck and connected to the radio. The control head is removable and with an extension kit and speaker you move outside and away from the truck. The control head works the same as if it were attached to the radio. The radio is still powered by the truck. I've done this a few times. However, I find that UHF and VHF are not very useful in most places I camp. Your radio wouldn't be of much use except in town. I can barely make contact with 50 Watts at times to any repeater. Five watts will work from my house, but when I head out for mountains or beaches not much good.

What's your call sign

Byron AK7EE
73
.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2015, 09:27 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
minke's Avatar
 
Name: alan
Trailer: looking
Colorado
Posts: 144
I don't yet have a trailer and have no experience there. I do drive around some though. We have two repeaters nearby on what you might call an 8,000 foot granite tower. They provide pretty continuous coverage from the New Mexico line to the Wyoming line. Yes, if you go west of the front range things get iffy, but if you are up high the odds get lots better.

I am coming to this discussion from a different view than you guys. I am still interested in the technical side of the hobby but that is all. I occasionally work on my mobile APRS rig and it is on now but in the house while I make a new truck mount. Go to aprs.fi and look for n4lbl-7.

My last real participation was 'til ~20 years ago and that was maintaining repeaters and I worked with folks who knew a lot more than I so I was learning a lot. That ended when my commute went from trivial to 92 miles one way. My participation in public service ended when the skywarn folks fought about whether some particular hail was pea size or 5/16". I never could figure out how to enjoy a contest or DXing.

Alan,,, n4lbl
__________________
minke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2015, 09:41 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 1,885

Seen at:
AB0MW - Ecomm Weekend photos
__________________
gordon2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2015, 09:46 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
minke's Avatar
 
Name: alan
Trailer: looking
Colorado
Posts: 144
How's the front-to-back ratio at 60 MPH??

Very very nice!!
__________________

__________________
minke is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
scamp


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HAM Radio in a 16' Scamp Deluxe frankcfx Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 6 03-16-2014 07:40 PM
Ham Radio Al POGUE Hobbies & Passions 103 10-22-2013 02:11 AM
CQ CQ Ham Radio Scampers... Bob H General Chat 4 06-15-2012 08:48 AM
Ham radio Scamp for sale on QRZ.com Mike Taylor Classified Archives 0 06-29-2009 06:47 PM
Calling all Campers! We have a need, Boler, Lovebug, etc sought&# Gigi Wanted: Molded Fiberglass Travel Trailers 0 11-20-2006 01:22 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.