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Old 12-31-2016, 12:36 PM   #15
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Name: Michael
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I'm recently retired and have been back country camping for 40 plus years. My suggestion is to carefully consider what your current and likely future needs will be. You don't want to find yourselves having to buy another unit because the one you originally purchased doesn't really meet you needs. There are a lot of units on the market that your vehicle can easily tow. Shop around. I have a generator, just in case but never use it. Solar is much better, quiet and cheap. You will need more than batteries for four to five day excursions. Propane works well for cooking and heating. Ice boxes can work but aren't convenient and you always need ice. A hot shower and inside facilities make the trip much more enjoyable which is the whole purpose of doing this.
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Old 12-31-2016, 04:54 PM   #16
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Jean,

There have been a couple of replies that you might not fully understand if you are new to recreational vehicles (RVs) and travel trailers.

Lil Snoozy does not offer built-in propane (LP) appliances with their trailers. This is somewhat unusual in that the vast majority of RVs and travel trailers currently manufactured include propane gas cylinders (commonly referred to as tanks) and propane appliances. I understand that Lil Snoozy will do some "preparation" such as running a gas line when constructing your trailer so another party can subsequently add the propane tanks and appliances. But in general, they are primarily built as "all electric" trailers.

Trailers and RVs generally have two to five appliances that require relatively large amounts of energy to operate. These include air conditioners, furnaces, water heaters, microwaves, and cooking appliances such as cook tops and/or range ovens. The most prevalent sources of power to meet these "high-energy" requirements are 1) propane gas and 2) "shore power" electric.

Operating a trailer or RV independent of "shore power", a connection to a 120 and/or 240 volt electric power source such as you have at home, is known as boon docking. In this case, you are not plugged in to a source of high-energy power. So, in order to run "high-energy" appliances you must bring along or generate your own source of "high-energy". Propane gas contains a tremendous amount of energy which you can carry in a relatively small container. This is also true of gasoline.

Lights, water pumps, some small fans, smart phone chargers, and other miscellaneous appliances and conveniences generally don't require much energy. They can typically be supplied from a trailer's battery for a period generally ranging from a couple days to perhaps a week or so. Some fans can drain a battery in less than a day.

A 20-pound cylinder of propane can generally run a refrigerator, water heater and stove for weeks. However, propane generally cannot directly run any commonly-available air conditioners, nor can it directly run a microwave.

An "all-electric" trailer such as a Lil Snoozy with no provisions for propane appliances will generally require some combination of "shore power", and/or operating a small electric generator to meet the high-energy demands. Electric generators are most commonly gasoline-fueled, but can also be purchased or converted to run on propane. (Yes, your suspicion is correct; this is in danger of getting downright circular!)

A "typical" RV refrigerator uses too much power to operate for very long on the 12 volt power which comes directly from most vehicle and RV batteries. There are specialized refrigerators available that run very efficiently on 12 volt power. Some folks have their Lil Snoozy built specifically with these refrigerators. The specialized refrigerators that run efficiently on 12 volt can be run off of 120 volt source through the voltage converter which is commonly part of any trailer with a battery, but they can not run directly on propane.

The refrigerators that will run directly on propane are commonly either two-way (will run on either propane or on 120 volt electric) or three-way (add limited 12 volt operation). When running on propane, most if not all of the commonly available refrigerators and water heaters require a smidgen of 12 volt power from the battery to operate their controls. Propane furnaces commonly require more than a smidgen of 12 volt power to operate their fan. The fan can draw a battery down in a single night.

I started this post thinking I would help clarify all this, but I'm not sure I have done a very good job here.

Stated another way, one of the things that I enjoy most about our trailer with all of its infernal complications and mechanical equipment is our three-way refrigerator, operating on propane. We find it very difficult to get spaces with electric power at State Parks on the weekends during the summer. However our refrigerator easily provides us with cold food, drinks and ice during hot weather.

As I wrote this, I was acutely conscious that every "rule" has one or often many more exceptions. So, I depended on a lot of very generalized statements. However, I hope that this is of some help in highlighting the consideration of whether it would be important to have an independent mobile source of "high-energy", most commonly either a supply of gasoline with an electric generator, or a propane cylinder.

Finally, I will acknowledge that another potential source of "high-energy" is solar, but that brings in much higher capital costs and some organic limitations that make it a relative rarity as an economical source for the amounts of energy that I am attempting to describe here.
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Old 12-31-2016, 04:55 PM   #17
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I think a Casita 17 would require a larger tug.

On average, a Casita 17 Deluxe weighs about 3200 pounds loaded (marginal) but carries 415 pounds on the tongue (over by quite a bit). If you want to keep the Escape , I wouldn't go larger than 16'. Ford also specs a frontal area limit of 40 sf, suggesting that the 3500 pound tow rating was tested with a low profile trailer.

Comments I've read about the Escape Ecoboost's towing performance seem to support going with a smaller, lighter trailer.
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Old 12-31-2016, 05:40 PM   #18
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Name: Jean
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There have been a couple of replies that you might not fully understand if you are new to recreational vehicles (RVs) and travel trailers.
Thank you so much for this thoughtful reply. This is very, very, very helpful.
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Old 12-31-2016, 08:49 PM   #19
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Jean,


I started this post thinking I would help clarify all this, but I'm not sure I have done a very good job here.
As I wrote this, I was acutely conscious that every "rule" has one or often many more exceptions. So, I depended on a lot of very generalized statements. However, I hope that this is of some help in highlighting the consideration of whether it would be important to have an independent mobile source of "high-energy", most commonly either a supply of gasoline with an electric generator, or a propane cylinder.
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Old 12-31-2016, 09:50 PM   #20
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Jean,

There have been a couple of replies that you might not fully understand if you are new to recreational vehicles (RVs) and travel trailers.
......
Mike, That is a great summary and explanation of what to expect when getting into this RV stuff.
Happy New Year to All!
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Old 12-31-2016, 10:01 PM   #21
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PM sent.
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Old 01-01-2017, 08:43 AM   #22
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The best advice

Usually the best advice will always appear from someone else . Since I've yet to see it , I'll pass it on ; ---- go to any fiberglass rally & check out the many different units & their mod.s . The campers are always happy to show their rigs . I have a 13 Scamp , 1 propane tank ,a ref. , & use a tiny el. heater . I removed the front bunks , & had a custom mattress made in place of narrow front bunk . My unit is lighter than most in keeping with simplicity.
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Old 01-01-2017, 06:24 PM   #23
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Name: Jean
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There have been a couple of replies that you might not fully understand if you are new to recreational vehicles (RVs) and travel trailers.
I can't tell you how helpful this reply was. THANK YOU! You hit your intended mark.

Jean
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:25 AM   #24
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Name: Jean
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Usually the best advice will always appear from someone else . Since I've yet to see it , I'll pass it on ; ---- go to any fiberglass rally & check out the many different units & their mod.s . The campers are always happy to show their rigs . I have a 13 Scamp , 1 propane tank ,a ref. , & use a tiny el. heater . I removed the front bunks , & had a custom mattress made in place of narrow front bunk . My unit is lighter than most in keeping with simplicity.
I will check out the rally schedule. Nice idea about removing the front bunks.
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Old 01-14-2017, 04:05 PM   #25
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Trailer: !977 KingsleyGMC, 1968 Bailey Mikado
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Parkliner

Someone mentioned ParkLiner here. I went an looked but it appears they are afraid to post prices???
Does anyone have any idea what a ball park price might be?

Thanks

Mike in NS
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Old 01-15-2017, 09:47 PM   #26
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Name: Beth
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Someone mentioned ParkLiner here. I went an looked but it appears they are afraid to post prices???
Does anyone have any idea what a ball park price might be?

Thanks

Mike in NS
Last year the base price was 19,900 and includes bathroom with portapotty, stove, microwave, ice box.
Options include things like upgrade to flush toilet, upgrade to refridge, screen door, AC, furnace, bunk bed. I think ours is coming in around 25K. My understanding is the price will be increasing this year.
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Old 01-16-2017, 06:09 AM   #27
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Last year the base price was 19,900 and includes bathroom with portapotty, stove, microwave, ice box.
Options include things like upgrade to flush toilet, upgrade to refridge, screen door, AC, furnace, bunk bed. I think ours is coming in around 25K. My understanding is the price will be increasing this year.
I had a conversation with management and they are in a major reorganization. They will be setting up 'dealerships' so a person can see what they are getting before putting down 25% or more for a sight unseen unit at a factory somewhere, maybe 1000 miles away, that you will have to go pick up.
You are pretty close on the prices with only a small increase for the new year.
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Old 01-16-2017, 11:32 AM   #28
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Dealerships usually have a significant markup on these units but will often compete for a sale. Shop around.
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