Matthew, wondering about trillium floors... - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-27-2015, 03:08 PM   #15
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Name: Matthew
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I agree to a certain extent, I am worried that the fiberglass has changed shape since it was molded. But truly if I managed to get it back as it was and it lasted until 2045 that's not a bad run. Oh I have the door jamb jacked up... check and see if the picture you were looking at has a little red jack or not... maybe I am overly worried about it sagging

Is it 3/4 or 1/2 ply ? What I have pulled up has been 1/2
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Old 07-28-2015, 07:22 AM   #16
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few more pictures
Attached Thumbnails
20150727_190922.jpg   20150727_172302.jpg  

20150727_140700.jpg   20150726_100844.jpg  

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Old 07-28-2015, 11:49 AM   #17
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I would just go with the same thickness as what you pulled up. As for the bend at the front, like I said, I have never done this, but I think I would look for thin sheets, like a hardwood veneer. Steam bend, then glue like them, with the grain at right angles. Maybe 5 layers, or what ever adds up to about 1/2". This would take lots of time, but doable.
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Old 07-28-2015, 09:09 PM   #18
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Oh, good idea
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Old 07-30-2015, 07:30 PM   #19
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Matthew, did you consider Pressure Treated plywood for replacement? This would add a few more years.

Harvey
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Old 07-30-2015, 08:05 PM   #20
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I am weighing my options over the work week and hope to have a plan and get to it on the weekend...

Pressure treated was what first came to mind but after thinking a bit I am not as sure. It usually seems like a lower grade wood product with rot resistance added. More importantly it is usually difficult to get things to stick to pressure treated wood, the fibres are already saturated in preservative

I have also thought about using CDX exterior grade plywood, it usually is dryer (for a better bond to the fibreglass) and seems stronger for the weight... Might be a readily available compromise

marine plywood seems like a good choice, although i just found out that not all marine plywood is actually water resistant!
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Old 07-30-2015, 08:15 PM   #21
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I think the main issue in my mind is weather the wood should be sealed or left to breathe...I noticed that the plywood that was totally sealed in fibreglass seemed to rot far more than I expected. It seems like if I could seal the water out perfectly and forever I could use any sort of plywood I wanted. Unfortunately that’s not going to happen so I get to guess.

The other bit is that the floor seems to have rotted from lack of maintenance and that in an ideal repair/referb there should not be water gathering to start the rot. everything that I have thought of to prevent wet wood from rotting has a drawback, keeping it dry is starting to seem like the easiest option
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Old 07-30-2015, 09:20 PM   #22
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Mathew on both my trilliums the four corners under the beds and front Groucho there are moulded drain channels which drain any leaked water out the floor . It looks like it is factory installed but I don't know if it is done on all trilliums it must work well as I have no floor rot on either trailer. You may want to consider them for your trailer. David May know about which trailers had them.
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Old 07-30-2015, 10:48 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironhinge View Post
I think the main issue in my mind is weather the wood should be sealed or left to breathe...I noticed that the plywood that was totally sealed in fibreglass seemed to rot far more than I expected.
If the wood was (fully) glassed in there should be no way it would rot. They have been glassing in thin plywood for support and stiffness in FG boats for years. If your floor was rotting out the FG had to have been compromised somewhere for water to get in.
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Old 07-31-2015, 08:11 AM   #24
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there is a lower part of the moulded body in the corners as you describe. I think you are right about the design and that something extraordinary happened to my trailer to cause this rot. I believe the floor rot has come as a result of the door side channels filling with water and it sitting there...
there are not any actual drains... if I was to go with the breathing approach I might put a vent fan that pulls air though these spaces like a bilge fan
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Old 07-31-2015, 08:13 AM   #25
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I guess I was assuming that at some point in the future there will be a failure in the fibreglass and that water would find its way into the plywood... if its possible I would love to totally encase the plywood. Do you think the polyester resin would bond to the plywood well enough?
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Old 07-31-2015, 02:21 PM   #26
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As far as I know all Trilliums have what I call, "pontoons" on either side. Curved depressions that overhang the frame on the outside. The lowest point on the pontoons is just ahead of and just behind the wheel wells. I have drilled 1/4" holes at these low points on all my Trilliums. In some cases lots of water came out.

There is a fitting that has a screen that can be installed in such holes. This would keep out the bugs. I have never found this fitting, but I have not looked very hard.

Trillium / Outback pours resin over the plywood till it is completely encased. I would think this makes it unnecessary heavy. The worst example of water exposure that I have seen is the trailer I call Humpty Dumpty.
I was sure I was done buying Trilliums for Now
The roof caved in five years before I bought it. There was a pile of six or seven sleeping bags on the floor. As I dug down in that pile the moisture content went up. I was sure the floor would be rotten. But, it is as sound as any other trailer in my fleet. How is this possible? I attribute it to two things. In early Trilliums, they put a mote around the top hatches into the gaucho, and dinette. This catches any water flowing over the seats and directs around the opening to the low side of the opening, where it overflows away from the opening. So very little water got into the space under the seats. And, any that did found it's way into the pontoons, which had holes in the bottom. The inside of the seats on this trailer look like new. The plywood is solid. This is why I did not wreck the trailer for parts.
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Old 07-31-2015, 04:29 PM   #27
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David, I was hoping you could post pictures or a link so I can see these gutters around the seats, It sounds like a really good idea. I had read in another post about the older trilliums and the good water management but I am still not so sure I get it...

also did the doorways have a lower threshold?
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Old 07-31-2015, 04:49 PM   #28
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I will try to post more pictures tonight. There is a lower threshold on the doors, but it is in the 1/4" range.

This trailer has the motes that I was referring to:
AB (Canada) - 1974 - Trilium 1300 - $5100

I am not sure why they went to a simpler dip for a sheet of plywood. Maybe people thought the mote was uncomfortable when they slept on it?
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