new here, could use some input - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-21-2016, 06:36 PM   #1
MKJ
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Name: mk
Trailer: shopping for lightweight
Washington
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new here, could use some input

Hello,

Anyone have any recommendations of units that are true 4-season but very lightweight? (or, able to be altered to be 4 season)? Trying to find a 4 season trailer my Dakota can pull that can withstand Eastern Washington winter.
Also, I'm interested in putting in a tiny woodstove for heat, heating water on, cooking on top, etc. I don't like depending on propane for heat. Are there tiny woodstoves made for trailers and RVs or does a person have to just get or make the smallest one they can find and get creative with how to put it in, to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning, leaks in roof, etc?
Also interested in solar and wind.

Thanks -

-MKJ
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Old 11-21-2016, 11:40 PM   #2
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Based on the fact that you asked your question on a fiberglass trailer forum, I will assume you are interested in that genre. There are only two fiberglass manufacturers that build 4-Season trailers, Oliver and Bigfoot. Neither are lightweight, both are expensive. I have no idea what the towing capacity of your Dakota is. Comparing comparable trailer lengths, camping weight on either brand will be well North of 5000 pounds. Both brands have a GVWR of at least 7000 pounds as both have twin axles rated at 3500 pounds each.

I don't know what Bigfoot would be willing to do in the way of customization as it relates to your desire for a wood burning stove. However, I believe I can speak with confidence that, despite Oliver's willingness to do just about anything a customer wants, they would balk at that idea. Solar, on the other hand, is almost ubiquitous within the Oliver camp.
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Old 11-22-2016, 12:32 AM   #3
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I've seen stoves that were sold for use in sailboats that burned charcoal briquettes or very small pieces of presto log or other similar product. They needed a lot of special attention to clearance from bulkheads. They got very hot and required a great deal of attention to prevent injury and fire.
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Old 11-22-2016, 03:05 AM   #4
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I agree with Jack the amount of clearance and attention need for any wood stove would not make this a good idea. Not to mention the enevitable smoke and noxious gas inside the camper whenever you open the stove door to feed it.
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Old 11-22-2016, 03:23 AM   #5
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I heat my home with wood. It's hard to beat a wood stove for instant warmth. But putting one in a trailer, I don't think so. They make small stoves for tents and ice fishing shanties but in a trailer there is just not enough room to be safe. Most folks use electric space heaters on grid and propane off grid. And there's always extra blankets and a dog . Raz
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Old 11-22-2016, 03:30 AM   #6
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I also heat with wood, in fact it's my primary heat source.
Another fact is that to burn wood you will be taking the oxygen out of the living space to feed the fire...This oxygen needs to be replace with fresh air from outside...not to mention you may want a little air to live too.
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Old 11-22-2016, 06:54 AM   #7
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Wood stoves for tightly sealed spaces have provision to draw combustion air from outside. Our home unit, which is also our primary heat, is set up that way. I agree that would be essential in this application.

I am skeptical myself, but I agree it would probably have to be a marine-designed unit, which means $$$. Seems like it would be really hard to regulate wood heat in a small space.
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Old 11-22-2016, 07:49 AM   #8
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Maybe this solid fuel heater from Dickinson Marine would do the trick:





Quote:
Newport Solid Fuel Heater

The Newport Solid Fuel Heater is a small stainless steel solid fuel heater designed for casual use ideal for boats 20-25ft. This heater burns one to two 1” thick wood or presto log, a handful of charcoal briquettes or coal. Removable ash drawer and damper control.
  • Requires 3” diameter chimney parts.
  • Minimum 4ft of chimney is required, a 6ft straight run with no elbows work best.
  • Chimneys 6ft or longer we highly recommend a barometric damper.
  • Permanent fresh air vent needed in area of the unit.
  • Decorative laser cut door.
  • Creates a dry heat to dry out moisture inside the vessel.
  • Removable ash drawer for easy cleaning & damper control.
Width: 7.88″
Height: 14.7″
Depth: 10″
Weight: 15 lbs
Heat Output (aprox):
Low: 3000 BTU
High: 8000 BTU
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Old 11-22-2016, 08:51 AM   #9
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The stove Ice-breaker posted is what I was thinking of. At $529 (West Marine) with flue pipe, roof flashing and other necessary materials extra, I think other options would be better. I have also seen very small oil burning stoves on boats. They doubled as a cook stove and a heat source. They were about the size of an RV propane stove. There are also some propane heaters that have a fireplace like flame that I personally would prefer.
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Old 11-22-2016, 08:55 AM   #10
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Check out the Dwarf 3Kw. Saw one installed in a Scamp where it sat on a counter top, but the ducts and installation details pretty much ate up half the counter. https://www.tinywoodstove.com/product/dwarf-direct-air/
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Old 11-22-2016, 10:18 AM   #11
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I wouldn't recommend a wood burning unit is a trailer for a number of reasons. These units can get very hot and unlike a propane fueled unit, their temperature is difficult to regulate. Their spacing requirements would be difficult to accommodate in smaller trailers. I have seen them in park model units but they consumed a lot of space.
Ventilation is also an issue. These units require combustion air which must come from outside, otherwise they will draw from inside the unit. If it comes from inside the unit, it must still be replaced with air from outside which will be cold during the heating season and this will cause drafts inside the unit to the point where using a wood burner will actually make your unit colder inside.
Without adequate ventilation the wood burner may back draft which means smoke and carbon monoxide may become a problem.
They concerns are avoided with a propane unit.
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Old 11-22-2016, 10:48 AM   #12
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Wood stoves

Quote:
Originally Posted by MKJ View Post
Hello,

Anyone have any recommendations of units that are true 4-season but very lightweight? (or, able to be altered to be 4 season)? Trying to find a 4 season trailer my Dakota can pull that can withstand Eastern Washington winter.
Also, I'm interested in putting in a tiny woodstove for heat, heating water on, cooking on top, etc. I don't like depending on propane for heat. Are there tiny woodstoves made for trailers and RVs or does a person have to just get or make the smallest one they can find and get creative with how to put it in, to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning, leaks in roof, etc?
Also interested in solar and wind.

Thanks -

-MKJ
:there are all kinds of wood stoves on the market for Marine use, so that is the first place I would look. When I was working on tugs we used Stove oil, worked real well just dropped down from the roof tank into the stove which I primed occasionally. Never a problem, I cooked Turkey, Chicken, Roast Beef, Pork, Ham u name it in the oven, did the rest on top of the stove for a lot of my Boss's friends and people he worked for, problem with wood is storage, and mess to always clean up as we were on the move every day either Log booms or Barges etc.. (this is what I called 24/7).
Stude
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Old 11-22-2016, 12:36 PM   #13
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Have you ever picked up a double pane glass window? They are very heavy.

Adding room for insulation that has enough volume to be effective within a fiberglass shell generally means creating some space for the insulation by adding wood framing inside of the shell. The weight of that wood framing quickly adds up with all of the pieces that are needed plus you also have the weight of the materials to create the inside wall surface which has to cover and protect the insulation.

Therefore as far as I know there are no light weight true 4 season molded fiberglass shells. The materials used to make them 4 season make them the opposite of light weight.
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Old 11-22-2016, 02:46 PM   #14
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wood stove for camper

There is a small cast iron wood stove called a (Tiny Tot) personally I would be afraid of one in my 13 ft Burro. It would take up too much valuable space. I have a small Mr Buddy propane heater. It will run you out quickly. I cover with a 0 degree sleeping bag on real cold nights. I also found many great plans for Clay Pot heaters using long burn Votive candles. It heats great for 8 hours. I found lots of plans on You Tube. some look shabby but I did find plans for one that is like a free standing lamp. Does not take up much room on the counter. I feel safe with it. I still crack open a window though. I camped last week in the Tellico Plains river area in Tennessee. It got down to 22 one night. I was very comfortable. I do have a propane cook stove inside but cook on a home made rocket stove outside using bio fuel, (sticks, leaves, and pine cones.) therefore conserving propane. I made my rocket stove using a freon tank. Also found the plans on You Tube. Good luck. Whatever you do just be safe.
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