What made you choose FBRV? - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-23-2016, 12:19 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: Jonathan
Trailer: In the market
Maryland
Posts: 11
What made you choose FBRV?

My wife and I would like to upgrade our tent to something a little sturdier, and when we saw a Scamp 13 at a KOA recently we were intrigued.
So we started looking at small RVs and realized that maybe this RV thing may not be so bad.
What we have found so far is that Scamp seems to be the most budget friendly FBRV out there with I guess Oliver on the luxery end.

It seems like an FBRV is more expensive than a regular RV of the same size, and often it seems like the regular RVs offer more attractive finishes for the same price.
So my question is, why did you choose FBRV over the other type?
Also, if you've owned both, what made you jump from one to the other?

Thanks for your time.
__________________

__________________
JustBrowsing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 12:44 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Bobbie Mayer's Avatar
 
Name: Bobbie
Trailer: Trails West Campster 1970/Escape 15A
Washington
Posts: 3,099
Registry
My first trailer is the Campster. It was 36 years old when I bought it. Part of the choice at that time- lightweight and would fit in my garage. But I was sold when I camped in it during a wind/rainstorm at a dog agility trial. My friend who had just bought a recent model "lightweight" trailer had leaks that night and ended up taking it back and never buying a trailer again. I was just fine and cozy in my 36 year old trailer.
__________________

__________________
Bobbie Mayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 12:51 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 5,920
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustBrowsing View Post
My wife and I would like to upgrade our tent to something a little sturdier, and when we saw a Scamp 13 at a KOA recently we were intrigued.
So we started looking at small RVs and realized that maybe this RV thing may not be so bad.
What we have found so far is that Scamp seems to be the most budget friendly FBRV out there with I guess Oliver on the luxery end.

It seems like an FBRV is more expensive than a regular RV of the same size, and often it seems like the regular RVs offer more attractive finishes for the same price.
So my question is, why did you choose FBRV over the other type?
Also, if you've owned both, what made you jump from one to the other?

Thanks for your time.

Fiberglass trailers last a long long time. Fiberglass is lighter, initial cost is lower. I've had my Scamp for 11 years, bought it new. Have had very little problems, and no problems with water leaks. Stickies often have water get in-between the paneling and outer wall causing rot that can go UN-noticed until the cost of repair is prohibitive.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 01:09 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Name: RB
Trailer: 1992 Casita Spirit Deluxe
Virginia
Posts: 106
It's probably worth mentioning that FGRVs hold their value better than stickies do, too. If you're shopping for, say, a 17 foot Casita, you'll be looking for a good while (they're all pre-sold before they're built) and can expect to pay 50+ % of current list price for a serviceable example regardless of its age.

As for which camper is cheaper/more available, I think that depends a lot on where you're shopping, what size you want, and how much work you're willing to do. The world seems to be full of affordable 13 footers, and you don't have to look very far to find one. They're generally closer to where they were made, so Burros are more commonly on the west coast, Casitas in the south and southwest, and Trilliums are much more common in Canada than the US. Scamps likewise, are more common in the midwest and northwest than elsewhere.

This doesn't mean that they don't get around, but if you're in VA, like I am, you're more likely to find a Casita than a Scamp.

If you want a 16+ foot trailer, they get scarce quickly, and if you find one you want, you'd best jump on it cash in hand.
__________________
steelypip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 02:01 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
Posts: 1,074
I went from tarps to tents to pop up trailer to smaller motorhome and then to my Scamp 13 foot.

By far the trailer is the simplest solution. It's always ready, self storing and cheap to keep once you pay for the trailer. Pretty much hook up and go.

With minimal roof leak points and no open seams on the roof to fail it will out live me. It's already 30 years old. Maintenance and modifications I can do myself. It cost me about 2 weekends a year to keep on top of it and once you pay for the trailer throw $300 bucks a year into a jar for maintenance and trailer registration it pretty much covers the cost to own it.

Some years I buy grease and wax and other years maybe tires or a battery. The biggest expense was the first year when I spent $5000 for the trailer and $1500 to catch up maintenance, rewire, add a heater and solar.

I do all my own work so my expenses are not typical.

This is the only thing in my camping lifetime I bought and when I am ready to part with it I will get most of my money back.

The biggest mistake I made was the motor home. It cost me too much to look at it and far too much to even think about taking it out. It just sat there burning money. All of my expired camping gear pretty much ends up in goodwill or the dumpster.

The Scamp just sits there and makes me and envious people smile. Except when the white trailer says hey I need a bath and a new coat of ZEP.
__________________
stevebaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 02:58 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Name: Darral
Trailer: Scamp Standard 13' 2010
Tennessee
Posts: 1,159
A 13' FG Scamp/Casita (that's all I knew about in 2010) is all I could pull. But after studying up and coming here, I realized there's more than meets the eye here. These things REALLY hold their resale value!!

Not saying I wont own a "box" trailer because of their size and roominess potential inside, but you wont get the service out of one of those for as many consistent years as you will our "eggs". I've seen WAY too much delamination, sagging frames, etc that it scares me with the laminates...not even to mention the "Stick and tin" trailers of yesteryear....and yes I know they're still available but do NOT ever want one!

The 13'ers are a "novelty". If you dont believe it, take one to any campground and just sit there. Be ready to play "Host"!
__________________
Darral T. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 03:46 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: Emily
Trailer: Scamp
Colorado
Posts: 343
Registry
We were tent campers for years and years, and intended to buy a lightweight popup camper that we could keep in our garage. Then some friends of ours bought one and we hung out inside of it during a storm, and decided it really was no different from a tent. Plus, it took them twice as long to set up the pop up as it did us to set up our tent (and again to take it down) and we decided nope on the pop up.

Then we bought a tiny 13 foot vintage trailer to paint and restore, but sold it when we realized how much rot was under the walls and how cost prohibitive it would be to fix all of it. We never even camped with it one time.

From there, we began looking at Scamps, for their lightweight status and ease of set up. As former tent campers, we wanted to still be able to camp in some of our favorite spots, which has been doable due to the small size. We also wanted to be able to simply pull in and unhitch with little time spent for set up. Our Scamp 13 has been incredible for us!
__________________
emij is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 07:53 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Roy in TO's Avatar
 
Name: Roy
Trailer: 1972 boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500
Ontario
Posts: 4,860
As a kid I tented and then dad bought a tent trailer. In Uni, we went tents because of $$. That suited us fine for years.

Then we got a dog that would not go into a tent, because the floor moved. We had to go to the East coast for a family thing in high season and many places don't take dogs. Especially if they are 80 Lbs. I found this site, listened to Donna D who said "consider it a hard tent on wheels" till you get it fixed.

I found a 13' wreck, cleaned it out and put duck tape over the hole in the roof. Some thought I had lost my sanity. A rally, then the big trip with a rally went well. And we were hooked.

Two dog itis, led to two foot itis. Plus a whole lot of new friends.
__________________
Roy in TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 09:48 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 Std
Arizona
Posts: 3,893
Registry
Pretty much what everybody said...
  1. I can tow it with a vehicle I already own.
  2. It weighs about the same as a smaller tent trailer but without the set-up and fold-down of (sometimes) wet canvas.
  3. It's solid and secure in bad weather (which got my wife on board).
  4. Its simplicity means less time and money in maintenance.
  5. It has fewer places to leak and less to get damaged if there is a leak.
  6. It fits in almost any campsite.
  7. It fits in two parking spaces at the shopping center.
  8. It's the only thing I have ever purchased (other than our home) that has appreciated in value.
  9. It's the only RV I have owned that I expect to pass down to my heirs.

    And most important,
  10. The "cute" factor means my kids are always asking when we're going Scamping again!
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1108.jpg
Views:	24
Size:	359.9 KB
ID:	100005

I have previously camped in tents, the back of my Subaru, a hand-me-down conversion van, a small Jayco tent trailer, and a Toyota mini motorhome. None were as simple, comfortable, and relatively effortless as the Scamp. The conversion van came close, but not when "I" became "we." No going back for me!
__________________
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2016, 11:23 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: Seeking Bigfoot 25 RB
British Columbia
Posts: 1,138
I did the tent thing. Also the "sleep in the back of the pickup" thing with a canopy on the back of the truck. That led to slide-in camper unit, which was top-heavy and generally a PITA to use

When I started to going to hot rod "rod runs" we realized that we were missing all the parties & socializing by leaving each evening to go to a motel

A "tin sided" sticky then followed me home. Within 3 years it was leaking, wood was rotting, etc. THEN I saw that nearly every hotrod was being pushed down the road by 13 foot Bolers etc. Since the 13 was too small for us we got a second hand (from another hotrodder) 17 foot Boler which we had for nearly 20 years. My '57 Chev never noticed it was there. Essentially zero maintenance required. We were hooked. A Bigfoot 21 (yes they DO make large F/G trailers!) then replaced the Boler 17 and now (after my Bigfoot got itself hit) I'm looking for a Bigfoot 25 footer. I would NEVER look at any other type of RV other than a molded glass one.
__________________
BCDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2016, 02:00 AM   #11
Junior Member
 
Name: Katrina
Trailer: 2017 Escape 19'
British Columbia
Posts: 18
As a kid, we always tent camped and I loved it! I continued to tent camp as an adult until I started noticing trailers and how comfy they looked. Our first trailer was a tent trailer, only kept it for one summer because I couldn't stand assembling it up and down and the zippered walls didn't keep the bugs out! . I fell in love with a little 13" Boler I had noticed for sale, but was soon sold. That started my quest for a "glass egg". Bought a brand new Scamp 13" in 2009 and we loved it! Towed well behind my 2005 Honda CRV. For a 13" it was quite spacious inside as it slept 2 adults, 2 kids, and 2 dogs! We out grew it and bought a 25" Salem (stickie). The Salem was a good trailer as our boys got bigger, but in my heart I always wanted to go back to a molded fibreglass trailer. Sold the Salem this Spring, and am now looking forward to our Escape 19" which will be ready for camping March 2017....can't wait!
__________________
KatZam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2016, 02:26 AM   #12
Junior Member
 
Name: Katrina
Trailer: 2017 Escape 19'
British Columbia
Posts: 18
Typos

In my above post, the trailer sizes should be in feet, not inches.
__________________
KatZam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2016, 08:15 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Name: Mitzi
Trailer: LilSnoozy 12/01/16, Tug 2012 Dodge Citadel
Florida
Posts: 259
Hi. My last true tent camping trip, as opposed to staying in the Tent Mahal in a city koa to enable dh to visit an historical city, was in 2006 at the NW Ontario Atikokan Base of the Boy Scout Northern Tier High Adventure Base. Since 2010 I've been a prisoner in the city due to extreme chronic pain and weakness due to pulmonary issues and weakness. I finally decided that an RV might be able to get me out in the great wide open again. Could not afford a motor home brandnew so started to research buying a used RV with the many blogs, websites, newsletters and YOutube postings. The "how to"s terrified me. Too much to expect to go wrong with a stickie. Leaks. Possibility of fires. Accidents. Besides, we are fairly modest, small living people and the stick builts just seemed to want to go into useless ostentation. Didn't want to have slides- didn't want to have to pull their weight or maintain them. Kept an eye on RV recalls. Stickies. Finally decided to check out casitas and scamps, which I had seen occasionally in campgrounds as I was checking in and out of the parks heading for the backcountry. Discovered they are made of molded fiberglass and there are many more manufacturers than just those two! Researched and believe me Jon's list mainly hits the highlights. Actually toured Parkliner- it would've worked for just me, but dh SWEARS he will come camping with me now. And we have 3 1/2 cats to tote along. Toured LilSnoozy, and that very generous underbed storage makes a nice place to have a kitty space, as we are staying very ultralight in our planning and logistics.
(that 1/2 cat is the kitten that the burglar dropped off- he's about half grown now)
__________________
"The island is not sinking!" Eric the Viking
Mitzi Agnew-Giles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2016, 08:32 AM   #14
Junior Member
 
Name: Jonathan
Trailer: In the market
Maryland
Posts: 11
Such fantastic replies!
We are a family of 4: 2 daughters, both love camping but my youngest is petrified of bugs.

How comfortable are the bunks in a Scamp 13?
We also have an Outback, and the Scamp 13 seems to be the best choice when trying to sleep 4, for what I am able to tow...
Is converting the bed to table and back to bed a pain or easy?
I'm also still very interested in more experiences of people who moved from box RVs to FB. I love your stories.

Thank you all for sharing.
__________________

__________________
JustBrowsing is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Solar(s) Panel(s), wich choose? Gilles Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 72 04-11-2016 10:45 AM
How do I choose?? FishBioGirl General Chat 8 10-08-2013 10:17 PM
Which small trailer would you choose? Joel3217 Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 12 05-13-2008 10:13 PM
Which FBRV's Qualify For Ca's PTI Plates? Joseph Domingos General Chat 17 05-06-2007 06:35 AM
Which small trailer would you choose? Joel3217 General Chat 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.