How know when Scamp battery is getting low? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-04-2014, 04:09 PM   #29
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It looks like this has been talked to death, but there are a couple things worth mentioning.

First, I like the idea of having a battery discharge chart, but never have one. For me, I just keep the fact that when my battery hits 12.0 volts, it's half-way discharged. If I go much below that I head into the danger zone where my battery can become "sulphated," shortening it's lifespan. (More on sulphation below.)

A second thing to keep in mind is you can't accurately measure a battery's voltage when the battery is in-use, which is most of the time when you're checking your battery voltage. DO NOT worry that your battery voltage is well below 12 volts when the furnace fan is running!

To more accurately measure our battery voltage I flick the meter on for a moment or two when the furnace is not running and most of our lights (except for an LED or two) are turned off . . . usually as we head off to bed. That way the draw on the battery is pretty minimal and the reading much more accurate.

Returning to sulphated batteries, something I've taken to doing is putting my battery on a "BatteryMinder" trickle charger during the off-season. The BatteryMinder runs in a maintenance mode that reverses the sulphation of batteries that occurs naturally over time. It's kept our battery in pretty good shape; some people have restored used, heavily sulphated batteries to useful service using a BatteryMinder, making it a pretty worthwhile $60 investment.
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Old 02-04-2014, 05:31 PM   #30
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Folks love talking batteries

I would say over all some pretty good advice on battery charging and maintenance as well as some good monitoring options.

GL,
Rick.
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Old 02-05-2014, 08:13 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by peterh View Post

Returning to sulphated batteries, something I've taken to doing is putting my battery on a "BatteryMinder" trickle charger during the off-season. The BatteryMinder runs in a maintenance mode that reverses the sulphation of batteries that occurs naturally over time. It's kept our battery in pretty good shape; some people have restored used, heavily sulphated batteries to useful service using a BatteryMinder, making it a pretty worthwhile $60 investment.
One of the issues I've had with 4 stage chargers like the Progressive Dynamics 4045 that came with my Trillium is that what is often billed as a desulfation stage is really a destratification scheme, boiling the electrolyte, useless on my AGM battery. Apparently these pulsing schemes will desulphate AGM and wet cells alike. The frequency and pulse width seems to vary with device. One article I read suggested a 1 kHz pulse frequency leaving me with the impression this process was similar to an ultrasonic cleaner vibrating the crystals away. Another article suggested an RF frequency.

"Pulse Technology (Tuned to the molecular frequency of the sulphur crystal of 3.26 MHz. ... a point at which the chemical bonds that hold the molecules together to form a crystal can be broken.) allows the user to electronically dissolve sulfation formations back into the electrolyte solution without taking the battery out of service."

I'm not sure what they mean by molecular frequency. Perhaps it's similar to the resonant frequency associated with quartz crystals?

I wonder if you have put a scope on your charger and determined the frequency and pulse width. Also I wonder how this process works on an AGM battery since there is no solution but rather a paste. Any thoughts?

Finally the same article suggested desulfation was a slow process.

De-Sulfation is not an over-night process. The larger the plate area and/or the more sulfation present, the longer it takes to remove same, simple. ... The typical de-sulfation process can take upwards of several weeks (or longer) for larger batteries, when doing several batteries at once, and for those with severe sulfation

None of the devices I looked at talked about this?

Based on your previous posts you've forgotten more chemistry than I know so your insight is appreciated. Raz
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