Protecting exposed propane line under trailer - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-04-2018, 03:37 PM   #1
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Name: Karl
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Protecting exposed propane line under trailer

Any ideas how to protect exposed propane lines under the camper?
I know they sit between the frame structure but I worry a root or low lying object may damage these copper lines.
I was contemplating putting a piece of plywood between crossmember to protect the area.
Karl
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:49 PM   #2
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I purchased a frame for a Trillium 1300 that had a steel 10 gauge skid plate that covered the propane lines.
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Old 09-04-2018, 04:44 PM   #3
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You are probably much more likely to rip out or damage any of several other low-hanging items under your trailer long before you would ever get near the propane lines. Seems like you're worrying about the last thing that could happen under there.
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Old 09-04-2018, 04:47 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Casita Greg View Post
You are probably much more likely to rip out or damage any of several other low-hanging items under your trailer long before you would ever get near the propane lines. Seems like you're worrying about the last thing that could happen under there.


Thanks yes, probably worrying too much. Maybe itís high time to finish fixing up the Trillium and going camping.
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Old 09-04-2018, 05:32 PM   #5
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Name: Jack L
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My 94 Bigfoot has the copper tubing inside a larger, clear plastic tube. Looks factory to me,
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Old 09-04-2018, 05:45 PM   #6
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Trailer: 1979 Boler 1300 / 1991 Casita Freedom Deluxe
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Scary thing happened to me while hooking up to go camping in the Boler. I was all packed and just going to turn gas on so I could run the fridge while on the road for the 3 hour journey and I could smell gas around bottle.
I checked all the connections and again could smell and hear gas!
About a year ago I put one of those plastic gas bottle covers on and had to snake the rubber, bottle to regulator, supply hose under the bottom of the cover.
This edge wore a hole right through the rubber hole and HIGH PRESSURE gas was leaking out.
I took the cover off and made a quick run to my RV dealer to get another supply line and was only an hour late...
"Better to be late then Absent"
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Old 09-04-2018, 05:47 PM   #7
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Also where the soft copper gas lines go under the cross members of the frame I put pieces of garden hole over the lines held on with wire ties.
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Old 09-04-2018, 08:37 PM   #8
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You can add more mechanical protection by sliding the copper through EMT electrical conduit that is U bolted or clamped onto the frame. It's cheap and stronger than copper. This conduit can easily be bent into a gradual curve that will allow the copper to slide through. Or, run a new 1/2" black iron propane line for the main feed with drops to the appliances at tees. U bolt it to the frame. This was the method used by the factory on my last toy hauler.
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Old 09-04-2018, 08:45 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
You can add more mechanical protection by sliding the copper through EMT electrical conduit that is U bolted or clamped onto the frame. It's cheap and stronger than copper. This conduit can easily be bent into a gradual curve that will allow the copper to slide through. Or, run a new 1/2" black iron propane line for the main feed with drops to the appliances at tees. U bolt it to the frame. This was the method used by the factory on my last toy hauler.


Yes thank you. I will soon replace the copper lines with black pipe and Tís.
I will feel safer. For now (frost here) Iíll leave it alone.
Karl
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:06 PM   #10
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The Trilliums that I have run the propane lines through a hole in the cross members. I have felt this provided enough protection for the propane lines. I was surprised to see the skid plate on the frame I bought.
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Old 09-05-2018, 12:54 AM   #11
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I don't know about any possible damage Karl. The LP line running along the frame is very well protected. If you should hit something to do any damage to the LP line......you're going to have much bigger problems to worry about, I'd leave it be.
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Old 09-05-2018, 04:18 AM   #12
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i've put foam pipe insulation around all the exposed propane lines. they're secured with plastic cable ties. i've done the same thing with the interior gas lines. probably overkill but it's one less thing on my worry list...

p@
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Old 09-12-2018, 07:05 PM   #13
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On our 4500 I put 1/2 inch plastic drip irrigation line over all the copper tubing. I just took a utility knife and cut the plastic the full lengthen to cover each section and then just spread it apart and slipped it over the copper line. When I cut it the length of it I didn't worry about cutting it in a straight line as if you go crocked when cutting it when you install it, it won't have the split running in such a way to come off of the copper. No need to put any tie wraps or any thing to hold it on as it is heat molded round and that's the way it wants to stay. I have had it on our 4500 for 9 years and over 65,000 mile with no problems. Yes lot's of hiway miles but lot of time outback.

My only worry was we use it for boon docking in the Mojave desert and rocks scraping against it or one flying up and putting a hole in it. It hasn't happened yet.

I also had the axle replaced 2 summers ago while in Sault, Michigan at Soo Welding shop that does trailer mods and hitches for over 50 year. I highly recommend this shop, my family has used them for any welding tasks that are out of our league. I wish they were in California where I live now as I am always building stuff. They put on a 3500 lb axle with brakes and set is so it raised the Trillium up an extra 3 inches for more ground clearance and they replaced the 1 7/8 hitch coupler with a 2 inch one and everything was $600 installed, they supplied everything. This shop knows what they are doing and don't try to beat you up on high prices. They had to order the axle and it was there in one day and they called me to drop off the trillium next morning. I took it in when they opened about 8 am and they called me at 2 pm same day and it was done. I went to pick it up and the job was better than I though it would be, nice quality welds and no burn spots on the fiberglass. He said the rest of the frame still looked good, it is a 1980 4500 trillium that lived it life, 36 years in California climate so no rust issues.

I had him save me the old electric brake setup to use on a utility trailer I have at home that needs brakes to feel safer in the mountains where I live.

The Irrigation line is available at Home Depot. I also use it as a conduit to run electrical wires along the frame on my tow vehicle as well as on the Trillium. It keeps them from getting scraped up or cut.
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Old 09-14-2018, 11:18 AM   #14
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I would not use black iron pipe. It rusts and the holes in the gas appliance jets are extremely small. Try not to create problems you do not have.
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