Time for new solar - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-21-2015, 04:36 PM   #15
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Actually, I am familiar with galvanic corrosion. In our really old house in the inner city many years ago the ¾ galvanized water pipes clogged up because someone (my father) mixed some lengths of pipe in the walls with ½ copper. What a mess.

I could however find in that learnéd thread no conclusive confirmation that brass hinges and aluminum sandwiched together will quickly corrode, even taking into consideration the clear fact that, (plastic excepted,) nothing lasts forever. I chose Home Depots' brass hinges because they were cheap.

The thread does raise fears about stainless steel and aluminum in a salt water environment. Not too concerned about that. My rough calculations indicate continuous salt air exposure could corrode aluminum in less than...um 7½ years, or less. However, I base this on the example of our old house. It could take less, or longer. We didn't live near the ocean.
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Old 04-21-2015, 05:20 PM   #16
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I'm an engineer. We're anal by nature. It's corollary to they'll ask at the inquest. It turns out that brass and aluminum are further apart that stainless and aluminum on the Galvanic series indicating increased activity. But again it has to have the electrolyte present. In your case I suspect it's a non issue.

I like your set up. You did a nice job. Those look like golf cart batteries. If 100 watts keeps them charged they will last a long time. Raz
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Old 04-21-2015, 05:33 PM   #17
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Raz, I think it is relevant that Aluminum oxide is a good corrosion inhibitor. Therefore, if the metal used with it would tend to corrode the aluminum, the aluminum oxide would slow this process down. I have been told that otherwise Aluminum would not have a reputation for being corrosion resistant.

The brass screws holding down the aluminum bullnose on my outside stars are exposed to road salt,(from our boots) dirt and water. Yet the bullnose looks fine.
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Old 04-21-2015, 05:43 PM   #18
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Raz I really liked how you held the spacing for the hinges with a bolt and clamp. Slick trick that.

I'm in the group that avoids metals that are know reactive, even if the rate is pretty moderate in non salt water/air environments. Here in Mich. roads are salted. One winter trip and there should be enough salt to get things going.

Been bit in the backside too many times by some screw that has either caused a corroded hole larger than its head or managed to weld itself in place due to that corrosion. Steel shift linkage shaft going through aluminum transmission case of the Ford Escort comes right to mind as to why I avoid it. That arrangement was prone to seizure. Don't ask how I know.
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Old 04-21-2015, 05:55 PM   #19
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David I'm no expert. I took a materials course many moons ago and know enough to know where to look. It seems to me that if an oxide layer were enough then aluminum wouldn't react to stainless either?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvanic_corrosion

If you read here paying particular attention to the section on Anodic index and the table that follows you'll have the same background I do. I find the finishing site I referenced earlier interesting in that it applies to real world problems and Ted Mooney explains things so well. Since looking east or looking west puts the ocean miles away, I don't think you have much to worry about. Raz
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Old 04-21-2015, 06:16 PM   #20
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Well, now I am going to have to go get nylon washers for my windows, which I put in with stainless steel, (Nickel) Screws.
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Old 04-21-2015, 07:04 PM   #21
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Well, now I am going to have to go get nylon washers for my windows, which I put in with stainless steel, (Nickel) Screws.
Ha. For what it's worth when I redid mine I used stainless as well. Mine use clamp rings inside the trailer. I'm not about to change them. Fortune favors the bold Raz
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:30 AM   #22
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Raz, they're the 6 volt Deep Cycle batteries installed by factory. Don't know from golf cart batteries - never played the game. My solar is (sic) currently attached and working in the yard keeping them fully charged (well, averaging 14.3 according to the display )as we speak.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:22 AM   #23
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Raz, they're the 6 volt Deep Cycle batteries installed by factory. Don't know from golf cart batteries - never played the game. My solar is (sic) currently attached and working in the yard keeping them fully charged (well, averaging 14.3 according to the display )as we speak.
Yeah, I've never played either. Six volt deep cycle batteries are often refered to as golf cart batteries because golf carts use them. They are very high capacity batteries. Two to three times the capacity of my single 12 volt. The Trojan T 105 is common. Yours look like Interstates. I'm glad you have to lift them and not me. Raz
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Old 04-23-2015, 12:37 PM   #24
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Well, now I am going to have to go get nylon washers for my windows, which I put in with stainless steel, (Nickel) Screws.
In your case a coating of dielectric grease on the stainless might relieve any fears I've created. Don't tighten too tight and double nut if machine screws. Check with an ohmmeter. Even if some metal touches it will limit any corrosion to that point only. Raz
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