Trillium 74 - Propane/Smoke/Monoxide detector suggestions - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-28-2017, 08:48 AM   #1
Member
 
Name: Olivier
Trailer: Trillium 1974
Saskatchewan
Posts: 37
Trillium 74 - Propane/Smoke/Monoxide detector suggestions

Hey guys,
I bought a Trillium 74 one month ago. It has a gravity furnace, 3 way fridge and a stove. All three are working but are old. Since I have absolutely zero knowledge on how to verify the security of those appliances, I decided to start by buying detectors.

I would like to have some thoughts on what to buy for the monoxide/fire detector.

Right now, I have this for propane already installed:
https://www.amazon.ca/MTI-Industries...mti+industries

I was going to buy this for monoxide:
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00...K6Y9EEQB&psc=1

Or is it best to buy both fire and monoxide all in one but without display screen?
https://www.amazon.ca/First-Alert-Op...+alarm+battery

Please let me know if you have any thoughts on those products and if you have any hints on what to check before leaving on a trip to increase safety.

Thanks alot for your inputs,
__________________

wysiwyg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2017, 09:23 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 7,954
Registry
Smoke alarm should be mounted high and LP detector low, so they should be separate. CO is neutral in relation to air, so it's less picky. It is sometimes combined with the LP detector.
__________________

Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2017, 10:46 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Name: J Ronald
Trailer: Currently shopping
North Carolina
Posts: 224
Dteectors

Follow what Jon said. Propane is heavier than air and hot gases from fire go up.
J Ron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2017, 07:21 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Carl V's Avatar
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: 1981 Trillium 5500
Quebec
Posts: 605
Registry
My trailer didn't have any detectors. I installed a combined LP/CO detector. It is mounted near the floor, as LP is heavier than air, but CO readily mixes with air and will be detected at just about any height if present.
Carl V is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2017, 03:20 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Gilles's Avatar
 
Name: Gilles
Trailer: Bigfoot 25B21RB, 2004
Quebec
Posts: 664
Registry
Do not forget, the propane gas sensor must be replaced every five years.
I have the same model that you present ..
__________________
Gilles
Bigfoot 25B21RB.
Towed with Dodge RAM 1500 Echo-Diesel, 3.0 L., 8 speeds.
Gilles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2017, 09:18 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 503
Propane is much heavier than air and will collect near the floor so the sensor should be located about four inches above the floor. Carbon monoxide has a similar density to air so the placement of this sensor isn't as critical. Smoke detectors use optical density and aren't necessary in a trailer.
Always follow the manufacturer's recommendations for maintenance and replacement as these sensors have a definite life span.
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2017, 11:22 AM   #7
Member
 
Name: Olivier
Trailer: Trillium 1974
Saskatchewan
Posts: 37
Thanks guys for your feedback,

Here is the monoxide alarm I bought:
https://www.rvpartscanada.com/index....5#.WaWXWiiGMuU

Also, from your comments and from what I have read online, the placement dont seem to matter so much for the CO. At first, I thought about installing it in the upper part of the kitchenette but I'm not quite sure how I would hide the wires.

Here is where I installed my propane and USB:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/6ldg3502vz...ector.jpg?dl=0

And finally, here is where I intend to install the CO detector - Photoshop (I might have to move the USB and Propane detector to the left and redo the wood plank). This way, all the wires come from the same place!
https://www.dropbox.com/s/39b47p82yu...ector.jpg?dl=0

Does that makes sense?

Thanks again!
wysiwyg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2017, 12:29 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 7,954
Registry
Looks good. Have to say, though, that's a lot of money for the CO detector, when you can get a basic battery-powered unit for around $15-20 from a big box store. But it won't be neatly flush-mounted like yours.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2017, 01:15 PM   #9
Member
 
Name: Olivier
Trailer: Trillium 1974
Saskatchewan
Posts: 37
Hey Jon,

You are probably right, and its probably too late (already ordered).

In fact, while reading articles about detectors, I have read that I need a CO detector designed specifically for RV because the readings would vary depending if its a home versus a small trailer (which I thought made sense).

Is that true? I'm not sure. Although, I figured that having something designed for a trailer would feel more safe (using 42 years old propane appliances that I dont even know how to maintain) :-)

Thanks for your feedback!
wysiwyg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2017, 02:24 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 7,954
Registry
If so, that's a new one to me (which proves nothing). Scamp installs the basic battery-powered kind on their new trailers (which may not prove anything, either).
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2017, 08:09 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Name: Jann
Trailer: Casita
Colorado
Posts: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
Hey Jon,

You are probably right, and its probably too late (already ordered).

In fact, while reading articles about detectors, I have read that I need a CO detector designed specifically for RV because the readings would vary depending if its a home versus a small trailer (which I thought made sense).

Is that true? I'm not sure. Although, I figured that having something designed for a trailer would feel more safe (using 42 years old propane appliances that I dont even know how to maintain) :-)

Thanks for your feedback!
You are wiser than you think. Yes detectors for RV's are better. Some are the same for house and RV and it should say for RV use. A smoke alarm is a complete necessity also. We just came back from a rally that had a class on alarms. The smoke detector is so needed because the smoke will kill you before you wake up if sleeping. You only have about 2 minutes to wake up and get out if a fire starts and maybe less if it is a small trailer. We mounted a smoke alarm above the side dinette in our Casita. In an RV a smoke detector for them is necessary. An ionization and heat detector is needed. If the fire is smoldering say in a cushion you can die of the toxins but the alarms will wake you. If it is hot heat then you better be getting out immediately. I've seen fires in RV's and it's not pretty. They are rarely saved. We also carry 3 fire extinguishers in the foam type. The dry type allow a fire to restart, is very toxic and you can't never clean up the mess. We learned all this from Mac the Fire Guy that has done speaking on this subject for years. He is now retiring because he didn't use breathing apparatus in his programs when he used powder extinguishers showing the difference and it destroyed his lungs. This is proof how toxic powder extinguishers are. You can look him up under the above name. We've seen his programs 3 times across the country and believe him above anyone else especially someone saying a smoke alarm is not needed. In our motor home we have smoke alarms by the bed, on the ceiling above the dinette and one is going in just above the engine area. All in a 21 1/2 ft unit. I'd rather be safe than dead. Our friends lost their 34 ft class A due to a fire underneath it. Four extinguishers of the powder type were emptied but the fire kept restarting. They were driving and they said they had about 2-3 minutes to stop and get out. They lost everything in their RV except their lives. Get a good RV alarm and foam extinguishers. At least if a small fire started you might have a small chance to save the trailer.
Jann Todd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2017, 06:02 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 7,954
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
...In fact, while reading articles about detectors, I have read that I need a CO detector designed specifically for RV because the readings would vary depending if its a home versus a small trailer (which I thought made sense)...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jann Todd View Post
You are wiser than you think. Yes detectors for RV's are better...
Being the kind of person who always asks why, I did a little searching. The answer that seemed clearest and most factual was here:
Choosing a CO Alarm

According to the article, the main reason for choosing an RV-rated unit is the sensor is designed and UL tested to operate in "unconditioned" spaces. It will perform as designed in extremes of temperatures to which RVs in storage are subject- think winter storage in Calgary and summer storage in Phoenix.

I read in the manual for my (non-RV-rated) CO detector that it should not be exposed to extremes of temperature because it shortens the sensor life. That appears consistent with the information in the article. Because of that I have always removed and stored it in the house when we're not camping (battery in the fridge to prolong its life). Of course, that adds a step to the preparation for a trip, but it also means I never forget to check the battery and expiration date and test the alarm at the beginning of every trip. I am comfortable that I am adequately protected.

The bulk of the article, and a number of other sources I found, put more emphasis on the type of detector. A higher quality unit that has a readout indicating when low levels of CO are present (below the threshold for an alarm) is a good thing, since long-term exposure to even low levels of CO is cumulative. That might be something to consider if you full-time or spend long months in your trailer.

I love this forum! It raises questions I wouldn't have thought to ask, and I am learning so much.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2017, 08:04 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
Posts: 6,141
Last I read on batteries said not to refrigerate or freeze them, which is what I used to do.
__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2017, 08:27 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 7,954
Registry
Trillium 74 - Propane/Smoke/Monoxide detector suggestions

Seems you're right, Glenn, although there is little harm in it, as long as the batteries warm up to room temperature when placed in service- condensation inside an electronic device isn't good. Since our house sometimes gets quite warm when we're out of town, there may be some small benefit as well.
Battery Myths vs. Facts

An added benefit is I always know where to find them!
__________________

Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
propane, trillium


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
High Quality Smoke Detector for TT? Trusty2010 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 1 05-18-2011 06:30 AM
What Smoke Detector? curtis c Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 11 04-09-2009 01:52 PM
CO/gas monitor questions also smoke detector Q. Bobbie Mayer Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 14 12-01-2007 06:04 PM
Propane detector Chris Z Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 13 02-24-2006 10:23 PM
Propane detector and Carbon Monoxide detector. Yves Pelchat Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 6 02-05-2006 10:28 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.