Wiring from 12v Batteries to Converter in Casita - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-23-2013, 01:43 PM   #15
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I'm running about the same distance to a PD9245 converter with 6awg welding cable. I have a 4' run of 1/0 to a 1500/2000watt inverter.

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Old 03-23-2013, 01:51 PM   #16
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I'm running about the same distance to a PD9245 converter with 6awg welding cable. I have a 4' run of 1/0 to a 1500/2000watt inverter.

jack
The OP won't say if it is an inverter or a converter, nor give any indication of the expected current to be carried.
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Old 03-23-2013, 01:52 PM   #17
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Go to a welding supply shop and get some welding lead. They have wire sizes #4 AWG to 3/0 AWG. The wire has a tough insulation and has extremely fine strands giving it great flexibility . Standard 3/0 building wire is not very flexible
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:00 PM   #18
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The OP won't say if it is an inverter or a converter, nor give any indication of the expected amp carried.
They said converter. You're right on amps, but that's what the chart is for. For my pd4045, which is 45 amps on 15', it was borderline 6-4 gauge, depending on the chart, so I erred on the safe side with 4 gauge.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:03 PM   #19
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While not inexpensive, you can get either boat cable or welding cable from GenuineDealZ. The advantage is they will make up cables to length with your choice of color, terminals (complete with heat shrink) etc. I used them for my inverter cables & was happy with the quality of the work.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:03 PM   #20
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I cannot recomend wire sizes due to liability issues.
But being Canadian, I am less reluctant in this regard. According to this link
Ampacity of Copper & Aluminum Wire

It depends on how much heat you can tolerate, (insulation on the wire). At the lowest heat rating, you are good to 145A on 2/0. at 12VDC, this represents 1740W. I would use this on a 1500W inverter. The highest temperature rating gets you 195A. At 12VDC that would be good for 2340W, or a 2000W inverter. 1/0 would just barely work for a 2000W inverter if the wire was rated to 90C, the highest rating. A 3000W inverter would require 4/0, high temp wire.
The longer the wire the higher the voltage loss, so keep your runs as short as possible on an inverter.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:20 PM   #21
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I didn't say that, progressive dynamics did. That chart doesn't show it's for 12 volt, and it doesn't go by length, so it's inaccurate at best. Likewise, they have a converter, not an inverter.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:38 PM   #22
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This is really easy stuff if you read the manual...and for those who are suggesting wire gauge it depends on the run length...which is also stated in the manuals. Converter or inverter..."read the manual" It will be stated there.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:39 PM   #23
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Along with heat ratings, with an inverter is is also necessary to consider voltage drop. Most high current inverters have a input voltage sensing circuit designed to shut down the inverter to prevent over draining the battery. The problem with undersized wiring is the voltage drop across the wiring adds to the lowering voltage at the battery caused by both the heavy draw & the state of charge of the battery, shutting down the inverter before necessary.

Most manufacturers make recommendations for wire size based on code for safety, and increase the size to prevent premature shutdown due to voltage drop.

As an example, my 1000 watt inverter from Xantrex draws around 93 amps at full load. The low battery shutoff is 10.5V, and low voltage alarm at 11V. While tables would indicate a smaller wire size, Xantrex recommends #0 for a run under 6' (12' of wire).
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:42 PM   #24
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Wire size

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
But being Canadian, I am less reluctant in this regard. According to this link
Ampacity of Copper & Aluminum Wire

It depends on how much heat you can tolerate, (insulation on the wire). At the lowest heat rating, you are good to 145A on 2/0. at 12VDC, this represents 1740W. I would use this on a 1500W inverter. The highest temperature rating gets you 195A. At 12VDC that would be good for 2340W, or a 2000W inverter. 1/0 would just barely work for a 2000W inverter if the wire was rated to 90C, the highest rating. A 3000W inverter would require 4/0, high temp wire.
The longer the wire the higher the voltage loss, so keep your runs as short as possible on an inverter.
Wire ampacity changes with the temperature rating of the insulation which is handy when you do derating due to number of conductors in a raceway but the voltage drop remains the same as well as the terminal rating.of 75 Deg C. The standard rule is to keep voltage drop across a conductor to < 3% or< .36 VDC on a 12 VDC system . The code often uses an 80% derating factor or a multipling factor of 1.25 to compensate for heating ,starting current , voltage drop and continuous loads (3 hours or more) Using a higher temp wire insulation is not the panacea for everything
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Old 03-23-2013, 03:10 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Jared J View Post
I didn't say that, progressive dynamics did. That chart doesn't show it's for 12 volt, and it doesn't go by length, so it's inaccurate at best. Likewise, they have a converter, not an inverter.

Ampacity of wire is irrelevant of voltage, or length, (until you run out of voltage). It is the government approved RMS current capacity, based on how hot the wire will get at a given current level.
Well, I thought it was still a valid facet of the conversation, sorry to be off topic, (canadian).
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:59 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post

Ampacity of wire is irrelevant of voltage, or length, (until you run out of voltage). It is the government approved RMS current capacity, based on how hot the wire will get at a given current level.
Well, I thought it was still a valid facet of the conversation, sorry to be off topic, (canadian).
I was referring to the ampacity charts per allowable voltage drop like I posted, which is a big difference between 12v and 120v systems. 2 volts on 120 volts isn't much, dropping from 12.5 to 10.5 is a big deal.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:36 AM   #27
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Thank for all the great advice guys. While at our local Menards I found a length of 3/0 cable that had been returned and got it for a great price. It might be a little overkill but I believe I won't loose the amps I would have with a smaller cable going the 15' distance.
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