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-   -   Why not Rhino liner on the inside walls/cabinets? (http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f55/why-not-rhino-liner-on-the-inside-walls-cabinets-25357.html)

Gigi 04-24-2006 08:07 AM

While at another thread that talked about carpet installation, the thought occured to me that the rhinoliner could be a great product for the INSIDE of the trailer, no? It is flexible, tough, has texture, can be rolled or sprayed. And, it's available in a variety of colors.



Wouldn't that be an option? Painting it on seems a lot easier than trying to get carpet or vinyl up into those valleys! If it chipped, one could reroll over it just like paint, no?

I found a webpage with a bunch of photos of different applications. Apparently, this is a poly product. The second website has the product specs.

http://www.rhinoliningsofspokane.com/photos.htm

And, another showing the use of it on the inside of a truck. This product can be rolled on or comes in spray cans in a variety of colors. I'm actually thinking about for my cabinets in the camper.

http://www.nonslipcoating.com/truckbedliner.htm

The stuff isn't cheap. $125 for a gallon. If they sold it in quarts, I'd be game to try in on my cabinets. Anyone know of a roll on in quarts?

So, what's the upside/downside?

Cheers!

Christi V. 04-24-2006 08:29 AM

that might work really well..... i would like to see a finished product in an egg first....
who is brave enough to try it? http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...efault/shg.gif

Deb in MN 04-24-2006 08:55 AM

Okay I thought that Rhino liner only came in black!! Cause that is all I've ever seen it, in trucks!

WHITE Rhinoliner??? THAT sounds good for the exterior! Maybe inside too, if you don't mind the texture of it. But exterior, for sure! Talk about weather-proofing one of our Eggs, it sure would.

The price of the stuff would be worth it. Sounds like it would last a long long time. Might even be worth it to have a pro automotive shop do it!

Loren G. Hedahl 04-24-2006 08:55 AM

Comment 1 -- What about insulation inside the cabinets? I would think if the rest of the coach is insulated, the inside of the cabinets would be the coldest spot. I wonder if anyone has had experience doing something like this and ran into a problem with condensate?

Comment 2 -- Two reasons for the high price. 1) Propriatary formula 2) Formulated with extra cost ingredients you don't need inside a cupboard, e.g., UV resistance.

What I like -- a couple coats of thick outdoor latex paint, then another couple coats of floor enamel. The latex paint fills and smooths the roughness of the bare fiberglass. It can be sanded, if desired to get a smoother surface. The floor enamel is just a good, tough, full-bodied alkyd enamel with lots of pigment and a dash of polyurethane to make it flow out real shiny. Both these products are inexpensive home improvement store items.

The only problem is the floor enamel is formulated for floors. You must apply thin coats on vertical surfaces to avoid runs. The best way is to spray a "fog coat", then when it tacks up, spray on successively heavier coats Just standard auto body painting technique.

Gigi 04-24-2006 02:31 PM

Quote:

that might work really well..... i would like to see a finished product in an egg first....
who is brave enough to try it? http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...efault/shg.gif
Hey, Christie!
If I can find it in a quart, I'm going to tackle it. It would be a nice improvement on my old cabinets. I may even play around with it for the doors. I painted them two years ago and the ones nearer the floor get banged up quite a lot. The rhino liner may be the ticket.

It actually looks like a lot of fun! (boy, do I live a dull life or what??? http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...fault/ohmy.gif

Gigi 04-24-2006 02:37 PM

Quote:

Okay I thought that Rhino liner only came in black!! Cause that is all I've ever seen it, in trucks!

WHITE Rhinoliner??? THAT sounds good for the exterior! Maybe inside too, if you don't mind the texture of it. But exterior, for sure! Talk about weather-proofing one of our Eggs, it sure would.

The price of the stuff would be worth it. Sounds like it would last a long long time. Might even be worth it to have a pro automotive shop do it!
Deb! Can you imagine what we'd be doing if we did live nearer each other? Smokes! I can just imagine it! My Faberge Egg and your Spacepod!

I am really going to pursue this for my cabinets. As an interior designer, many companies will send me free samples to try. I may write a few of the providers and tell them what I am doing and see if they would give me a color deck and a bit of the stuff with which I can experiment.

It would be very interesting to see how the application is and the performance.
Did you see the colors?

BTW, I changed the link to the correct one at my Faberge thread. Go take a looksie! http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...ault/smile.gif

Cheers!
Gigi

Gigi 04-24-2006 02:41 PM

Quote:

Comment 1 -- What about insulation inside the cabinets? I would think if the rest of the coach is insulated, the inside of the cabinets would be the coldest spot. I wonder if anyone has had experience doing something like this and ran into a problem with condensate?

Comment 2 -- Two reasons for the high price. 1) Propriatary formula 2) Formulated with extra cost ingredients you don't need inside a cupboard, e.g., UV resistance.

What I like -- a couple coats of thick outdoor latex paint, then another couple coats of floor enamel. The latex paint fills and smooths the roughness of the bare fiberglass. It can be sanded, if desired to get a smoother surface. The floor enamel is just a good, tough, full-bodied alkyd enamel with lots of pigment and a dash of polyurethane to make it flow out real shiny. Both these products are inexpensive home improvement store items.

The only problem is the floor enamel is formulated for floors. You must apply thin coats on vertical surfaces to avoid runs. The best way is to spray a "fog coat", then when it tacks up, spray on successively heavier coats Just standard auto body painting technique.
You bring up a great point about condensation inside the cabinets. Wouldn't you want to paint the inside of them, too, Loren? That should take care of the possible problem, no?

I agree the rhino liner is expensive, but, I did use a floor paint for my wood cabinet doors and now, after two years, I need to recoat them. I think for cabinets and doors, something with a bit more resilience may be better.

Of course, if it I don't have a great outcome, it could be a pain to remove! But, it may spur me to simply replace the cupboards entirely.

Your so right, Loren, your paint could be a sight less expensive, short term and long term!!! http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...efault/l31.gif

Loren G. Hedahl 04-24-2006 04:00 PM

Gigi -- I'm wondering why are you needing to recoat your cabinet doors after just two years? Is the paint cracking? Chipping off? Blistering? Scuffed? Tired of the color?

Were these the original doors that are usually made of vinyl coated fiberboard?

If condensate forms, it will form on the inside surface of the coach body. But with the cabinets having closed doors, there would be little air circulation to dry it out.

On yachts they run into the same problem and are careful to insulate the inside of the hull, even inside the cabinets. Then they like to provide for air circulation by adding holes or slots in the cabinet above and below each door, or build the door of slats, woven fabric or whatever.

I'm sure the Rhino coat is better than enamel; it's gotta be or it wouldn't hold up in a pick-up bed. Could be if you did the prep work and masking, the Rhino guy might be interested in doing the job for a very reasonable price. You won't know unless you ask.

Come to think of it, I think an ideal FGRV would start off as a shell, have foam insulation sprayed on inside and the entire interior coated with Rhino lining. Just a quick wipe down would spiffy it up in a jiffy. If things got too gross, a quick wash down with a pressure washer would tidy things up.

Gigi 04-24-2006 04:30 PM

Quote:

Gigi -- I'm wondering why are you needing to recoat your cabinet doors after just two years? Is the paint cracking? Chipping off? Blistering? Scuffed? Tired of the color?

Were these the original doors that are usually made of vinyl coated fiberboard?

If condensate forms, it will form on the inside surface of the coach body. But with the cabinets having closed doors, there would be little air circulation to dry it out.

On yachts they run into the same problem and are careful to insulate the inside of the hull, even inside the cabinets. Then they like to provide for air circulation by adding holes or slots in the cabinet above and below each door, or build the door of slats, woven fabric or whatever.

I'm sure the Rhino coat is better than enamel; it's gotta be or it wouldn't hold up in a pick-up bed. Could be if you did the prep work and masking, the Rhino guy might be interested in doing the job for a very reasonable price. You won't know unless you ask.

Come to think of it, I think an ideal FGRV would start off as a shell, have foam insulation sprayed on inside and the entire interior coated with Rhino lining. Just a quick wipe down would spiffy it up in a jiffy. If things got too gross, a quick wash down with a pressure washer would tidy things up.
Hi, Loren!
The paint isn't peeling or flaking, it's performing well, I just keep banging into the doors or things are moving around as I'm driving. That's why the Rhino may be a good solution for me. They are the original cabinet doors that were sanded, primed, and painted with a great floor paint that is similar to the paint used on boats. I did quite a bit of research on it as I was considering doing the exterior, too. The gelcoat is in good shape, however, it just would be fun to give it a light dusting of color.

I thought the same about the cabinets, if there were a few airholes placed discreetly, it should be alright.

We are in total agreement about the ideal FGRV interior. To be able to wipe it all down, touch up if need be, change color if one wishes...it is just ideal. I wonder if the new Trillium's or new Egg that's coming out has given this any thought?

I just can't wait to experiment with some of the product. Years ago, I had over 1,000 go through my faux finish classes. This sort of thing is right up my alley! I imagine using it as a stripe, with a stencil, on cabinets to create a picture frame effect, on the backsplash and paint it to look tiled...see, I just can't stop! http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...ault/smile.gif

Benny K 04-24-2006 06:53 PM

Hi Gigi, If I were you, I would also check the additional weight with the Rhino coating , that stuff is fairly heavy I think....something else too is, does it off gas fumes from the material it`s made from and for how long? .....different in a pick up box but in a confined space you may have a problem with breathing it....just a couple thoughts....Benny

Donna D. 04-24-2006 08:40 PM

Benny's right, that stuff is heavy. I had two front vehicle fenders commercially sprayed and the difference in weight between sprayed and unsprayed is considerable.

I wouldn't do it for that reason alone, but what would you gain by using it? Texture and color...to me that seems like about it. There are other products for color (like paint) and maybe just the bare fiberglass would have enough texture? One thing for certain, you wouldn't gain any insulating properties to speak of.

Seems to me there are have more people trying to find assistance in removing the stuff from the front exterior of their trailers, than people wanting help with applying the stuff. Maybe that speaks to why you might not want to use it http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...efault/shg.gif

Gigi 04-25-2006 09:40 AM

Quote:

Hi Gigi, If I were you, I would also check the additional weight with the Rhino coating , that stuff is fairly heavy I think....something else too is, does it off gas fumes from the material it`s made from and for how long? .....different in a pick up box but in a confined space you may have a problem with breathing it....just a couple thoughts....Benny
Hi, Benny, my neighbor to the North!

I did look at the weight and wonder how much the ensolite and adhesive weighs. It would be a consideration, certainly.

Your question about fumes is well taken. All the new homes I do gives pause for the chemical release. The average new home gives off fumes for at least one year. You are right about questioning this product. It would be worth talking to the company about prior to application in a confined, somewhat closed, space.
Good thoughts, Benny! Thanks for the input!
Gigi

Gigi 04-25-2006 09:47 AM

Quote:

Benny's right, that stuff is heavy. I had two front vehicle fenders commercially sprayed and the difference in weight between sprayed and unsprayed is considerable.

I wouldn't do it for that reason alone, but what would you gain by using it? Texture and color...to me that seems like about it. There are other products for color (like paint) and maybe just the bare fiberglass would have enough texture? One thing for certain, you wouldn't gain any insulating properties to speak of.

Seems to me there are have more people trying to find assistance in removing the stuff from the front exterior of their trailers, than people wanting help with applying the stuff. Maybe that speaks to why you might not want to use it http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...efault/shg.gif
Hello, Donna
As I posted to Benny, I did look at the weight.

I beg to differ with your last statement that "People are trying to find assisstance in removing the stuff...than applying the stuff". We only hear from people who are having problems, but, surely there are people who are happy with the product who aren't adding to these discussions?

Finally, I think there's a lot to gain by using this on the inside. Several people speak of allergies to that carpet, people dislike the idea of hanging carpet or ensolite, and most everyone likes the idea of being able to wipe off a very durable surface. I have the ensolite and really like the texture. Mine's in such good shape I don't want to replace it, but, there's a lot to be said about rolling on a paint than to hanging carpet or vinyl.

Someone here said the product does insulate, how do we know that the product doesn't offer any insulation value? I would like to talk to a company product person to determine that myself. If I had to guess, I think the very thing that adds the weight to the product likely offers an insulation value. But, I'm not a chemical engineer. Far from it, actually! http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/st...ault/smile.gif

Roger H 04-25-2006 09:48 AM

Quote:

WHITE Rhinoliner??? THAT sounds good for the exterior! Maybe inside too, if you don't mind the texture of it. But exterior, for sure! Talk about weather-proofing one of our Eggs, it sure would.
I have a white Tundra and called both Line-X and Rhino about doing the bedliner for me. I may yet have it done, but in talking about doing it in white, both said that it will be a lovely sick shade of pale yellow within a year or so. Apparently UV degrades the white almost immediately. <sigh>

Back to the drawing board... when I have my pickup bed done, I guess I'll get it done in basic black...

Roger


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