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-   -   Replacing Water Heater rod (http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f55/replacing-water-heater-rod-38356.html)

Karalyn 06-10-2009 06:51 PM

I spent a couple of hours today trying to screw in the water heater rod so I can have hot water this summer. This is the rod that must be taken out in the fall and put back in in the spring. I have had trouble other years but this yr I just can NOT get the thing screwed back in. I have an appointment at Camping World on Friday to have them do it for me (there goes another $100 bill).
Anyone have any idea how to get the rod screwed in so I don't have to take it to Camping World?
I know it should just screw in, but it won't :-(

Karalyn 06-10-2009 09:00 PM

I got it in, :woohoo:
I went to the "other forum" and went back about 2 to 3 yrs until I found something relating to the problem. I am glad to know I am not the only one having problems with this thing. After three hours off and on of both me and my hubby trying to tackel the dumb rod it finally caught and screwed in.
It is not leaking, and the water got hot.
Problem solved until next spring!

David & Leslie 06-10-2009 09:25 PM

:woohoo: Dontcha love it when a plan (finally) comes together? Happy camping! L 'n D

Donna D. 06-11-2009 05:37 AM

Karalyn, care to share your tips... the things you found that worked? Others are more than likely going to run into this issue sometime... probably me! Sure would appreciate knowing what to expect.

:exactly:

Alf S. 06-11-2009 05:56 AM

Hi: Karalyn... Glad you got it back in. FRUSTRATING EH!!!It is a very tight space to put enough fingers in; and trying to hold the rod straight when 99% of it is inside the heater is a trick!!! They aren't exactly light weight either. I used my vise clamps to hold it straight and wrapped it with Teflon tape to give a little slip to the threads and also to prevent leaks. So far So good.
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie :wave

Bill K 06-11-2009 08:32 AM

I think part of your problem is leaving the rod out all winter.

I would drain the tank leave it sit for a couple of days to dry and then put it back in.

That way nothing can happen to the threads over the winter.

Bill K

Randy Magee 06-12-2009 05:34 AM

Quote:

I think part of your problem is leaving the rod out all winter.

I would drain the tank leave it sit for a couple of days to dry and then put it back in.

That way nothing can happen to the threads over the winter.

Bill K
My thoughts exactly! I use an anti-seize compound on the threads after I drain the tank and reinsert... I've never waited for the tank to completely dry out... I can't see how that would help, after all it is a water tank.

Bill K 06-12-2009 06:06 AM

Randy,
Since it looks like you live in the south I can understand your confusion.

The water freezes and can break things up here in Ohio.

Bill K

Quote:

My thoughts exactly! I use an anti-seize compound on the threads after I drain the tank and reinsert... I've never waited for the tank to completely dry out... I can't see how that would help, after all it is a water tank.

Randy Magee 06-13-2009 06:32 AM

The little bit of water left in the water tank after draining would cause no problem even if it froze, if the tank were left full, sure it would be a problem... water left in the water lines would be another problem in freezing temps. The Surburban Water Heater Manual recommends that to winterize the tank, you close the tank off with the bypass valve, remove the anode rod and and drain the tank. You would want to replace the anode rod at this point to prevent intrusions into the tank of small rodents or insects. The only time they recommend removing the anode rod for the winter is when there is no bypass valve installed and you are introducing antifreeze into the system. In that case they recommend you remove the anode rod and replace it with a 3/4 " plug as the antifreeze has an adverse reaction on the anode rod. I would think rodents making a nest in the heater over the winter would cause many more problems than a few drops of water left in a drained tank.

Steve Outlaw 06-13-2009 12:06 PM

Quote:

Randy,
Since it looks like you live in the south I can understand your confusion.

The water freezes and can break things up here in Ohio.

Bill K
Anything (rusting, corrosion, etc.) that could/would happen to the threads over the winter would most likely happen anyway during the few days the threads are exposed to the atmosphere waiting on the interior of the tank to dry. This is an iron fitting and it will rust in a matter of hours. Water only expands 10% when it freezes (even in Ohio) so the little bit left in the tank won't "break" anything...


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