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-   -   Solar Panel output in the shade? (http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f95/solar-panel-output-in-the-shade-59383.html)

Ryan P R 07-01-2013 07:00 PM

Solar Panel output in the shade?
 
I'd really like to mount solar panels on my roof so I don't have to mess with setting them up or storing them inside of the trailer.

On the other hand we always camp in the shade! I realize that shade from trees will dramatically reduces the performance of solar panels, but they've still got to provide some charging power right? How much?

My quick math tells me that 15-20 amps of charging per day should more than cover my needs in nearly every situation. So I was thinking if I put 100watt solar panel on my roof (max output of 5.8amps) and I only average 1.5 amps or so per hour on average-while parked under the shade of trees- that should do the trick.
The problem is I don't know how much output these panels will produce in the shade, or if any useable amount at all. To be clear, I'm not talking about a partially shaded panel, I'm referring to a panel completely shaded from DIRECT sunlight by the tree canopy. Surely the indirect sunlight has to provide enough light for the panel to have "some" output... Or so I hope.

I already have all LED lights, a low amp draw water pump, low draw furnace 1.8amps, and low draw fans....

jwcolby54 07-01-2013 09:08 PM

That is a good question and one which one of our solar powered members should be able to address. My gut feeling is that "deep shade", i.e buried in a forest, you will not get much. They do put out a fair amount on cloudy days but that is not the same as heavy forest canopy.

I intend to put a big panel or even two on my roof. Perhaps two 100-140 watters if I can fit them up there. Then I will have one more that is mobile for the "just in case".

Perry J 07-01-2013 09:32 PM

Several years ago I stayed in Yellowstone for a week.
The Campground was among 60 to 80 feet tall pines, so no direct sun.
My flat roof mounted 50W panel never let me down.
In September the nights get pretty cold so the furnace was on every night.
All of my lighting was LED so that may have helped.

FTTRV 07-01-2013 10:55 PM

In bright sun my solar panel puts out over 19 Volts but it comes the wire to the inverter panel it reads 12Volts. In the shade and overcast the panel will charge some.
Chuck

Jon Vermilye 07-02-2013 06:11 AM

I don't have a problem keeping up with normal usage in light shade using a 95 watt panel, however heavy shade for a couple of days will start to drop the batteries. I have a pair of 6v batteries, LED lighting, etc. I do use a 1000 watt inverter to make a pot of coffee each morning that draws around 10 amp/hrs.

With careful use I've been able to camp without a generator for up to two weeks in partial shade.

itlives 07-02-2013 06:37 AM

It all comes down to math and a volt meter. You won't know if it'll work until you try it. Maybe you could borrow one from someone and just put it up on the roof when you camp the next time to see if it will work for you.
Some panels work better in the shade than others. Do some homework on that front.
My 64 watt panel puts out more energy than my 125 watt panel in the the shade.

multi-task 07-02-2013 10:16 AM

The best thing I bought to monitor shading issues was a proper meter. I use a Tri-Metric. My older 75w panel worked fine in good sun but once it had even slight shading it's voltage dropped and amps dropped even more. I changed panels this year because of it. I'd recommend a good meter even if you don't have a solar panel.

Ryan P R 07-02-2013 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itlives (Post 399971)
It all comes down to math and a volt meter. You won't know if it'll work until you try it. Maybe you could borrow one from someone and just put it up on the roof when you camp the next time to see if it will work for you.
Some panels work better in the shade than others. Do some homework on that front.
My 64 watt panel puts out more energy than my 125 watt panel in the the shade.

What type/brand of panel is your 64 vs your 125 watt panel?

Unfortunately I don't know ANY other RVers, and definitely no one that has a panel for me to borrow for experiments. My friends either don't camp- or backpack/carcamp.

jwcolby54 07-02-2013 10:28 AM

And is there a way to select a solar panel that does "work in shade". I have done a lot of reading on solar and what I seemed to be reading is that shade in any given cell causes a high resistance in that cell which affects every other cell in series with that cell. In some cases it seemed to entirely shut off the cell that was shaded, or so it appeared.

multi-task 07-02-2013 10:46 AM

Decent panels will have bypass diodes built in to assist with shading problems, however I wouldn't expect to park under a tree and get much out of a panel. More efficient panels are also much more expensive. I'm currently experimenting with a higher voltage panel to see if it helps in shaded areas, it's roof mounted and runs around 42v. My first trip this year was in a 3 day rain storm and it still managed to put out up to 8amps depending on how heavy the cloud was. I wasn't facing south so I was happy with the performance. However running a higher voltage panel will require a different controller so that might not be the solution for everyone.

jwcolby54 07-02-2013 11:45 AM

I am starting from scratch and have been looking at starting with the higher voltage panels. They are less common = more expensive though.

itlives 07-02-2013 12:50 PM

My 64 watt is Unisolar
My 125 watt is US Solar
Unisolar does not make the 64 in a panel anymore. Sometimes you can find one on Ebay. They areflexible in an aluminum frame. I had a tree branch fall on it and bend the frame with no effect (I bent it back). Most panels come in glass -as did my 125. Unisolar does make the 64 w in a roll out panel but it's pretty long.
US Solar is still in business and I paid $2 a watt delivered. That's watt (LOL) you want to look for the - $ per watt.
As always, do your research.

honda03842 07-02-2013 01:07 PM

Ryan, I think fully charging your battery and doing some front yard pretending is the way to work it out. This will give you a good image of what you use for power.

We have a 10 amp dc voltmeter that we use to measure the solar panel's current output. It could also be used to measure current draw from the battery by inserting it in the lead from the battery to the trailer.

Otters 07-02-2013 03:39 PM

Although it takes a little extra set up time, it sounds like the portable panels would work best for your needs. The people here on the forum really like the flexibility it offer them.


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