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Gennaver 11-08-2015 06:23 AM

Tarp or cover for long term open RV park
 
Hi,
The RV park I am looking to move to, in the Mojave desert, has water, electric but is otherwise bare bones with no cover.

What would you recommend I use as a cover for my anticipated refurbished 1978 Trillium 4500 from Randy? He is out of town for another week and I look forward for some advice.

The rv park is open, and the Mojave reaches 120 in the summer and the cooler at night, depending on the season. I'm worried about schorching the trailer in the sun and heat.

When I looked at the live view from mapquest of the park everyone was just in the open with no cover.

Found this thread--> http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...oot-47816.html

Jon in AZ 11-08-2015 07:44 AM

2-3 coats of wax spring and fall is about the best thing you can do for the trailer. Dust and wind limit the use of just about any type of temporary awning or cover I can think of.

As to triple-digit temperatures... Is there a higher altitude location you could move to during the hottest months? Small fiberglass trailers are not really designed for extremes of heat and cold. The jalousie windows in a Trillium won't accept an AC unit or swamp cooler.

Gennaver 11-08-2015 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 557573)
2-3 coats of wax spring and fall is about the best thing you can do for the trailer. Dust and wind is going to limit the use of just about any type of temporary awning or cover I can think of.

As to triple-digit temperatures... Is there a higher altitude location you could move to during the hottest months? Small fiberglass trailers are not really designed for extremes of heat and cold. The jalousie windows in a Trillium won't accept an AC unit or swamp cooler.

My location will be fixed, due to work. However I was considering a stand up ac, similar to how my oil radiator is stand up also. They do not have great reviews at all but, triple digits have me wanting to get one and also to try and block the sun from baking the RV. Portable Air Conditioner Reviews - Consumer Reports News

Jen
edit to say, I'm glad you replied Jon, in AZ I knew you'd have good info

Jon in AZ 11-08-2015 08:48 AM

Honestly, I'm a bit dubious about living in a small fiberglass trailer through a Mojave Desert summer, but I will never say never. Did some crazy things myself when I was younger, and survived. :D

Hopefully you will move to the area during the cooler months. You can settle in and learn from others how to adapt to the climate. I do think you might want to investigate swamp (evaporative) coolers. I had never heard of them until I moved to AZ. My first 3 years here I lived in a (larger) travel trailer with a rooftop swamp cooler. It worked well except during our "monsoon" season when the relative humidity was too high. A side-draft evaporative cooler parked outside your trailer on a stand and ducted somehow into the trailer might be your best bet.

Shade is tricky. I've driven through the area in summer, and 25+ mph winds are normal. That means you can't leave any kind of fabric awning up when you're away from the trailer. It also means dirt and sand will get under a cover and turn it into sandpaper on your fiberglass. :eek: Unless the park rules will let you erect (and securely anchor!) a metal carport structure, I really can't think of any other way.

EDIT- pieces of Reflectix (foil bubble wrap) in the windows on the sunny sides (especially east and west) will help with heat gain. Care in how you orient the trailer helps, too.

Gennaver 11-08-2015 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 557579)
Honestly, I'm a bit dubious about living in a small fiberglass trailer through a Mojave Desert summer, but I will never say never. Did some crazy things myself when I was younger, and survived. :D

Hopefully you will move to the area during the cooler months. You can settle in and learn from others how to adapt to the climate. I do think you might want to investigate swamp (evaporative) coolers. I had never heard of them until I moved to AZ, and when I lived in a (larger) RV for 3 years, I used a swamp cooler. A side-draft evaporative cooler parked outside your trailer on a stand and ducted somehow into the trailer might be your best bet.

Shade is tricky. I've driven through the area in summer, and 25+ mph winds are normal. That means you can't leave any kind of fabric awning up when you're away from the trailer. It also means dirt and sand will get under a cover and turn it into sandpaper on your fiberglass. :eek: Unless the park rules will let you erect (and securely anchor!) a metal carport structure, I really can't think of any other way.

EDIT- pieces of Reflectix (foil bubble wrap) in the windows on the sunny sides (especially east and west) will help with heat gain. Care in how you orient the trailer helps, too.

I will look into a swamp cooler. Thankfully I will be moving in the winter, (in less than ten weeks.) However, I hear by April they reach 100 F. Reflectix sounds like it is a must too.

Although, I am not sure how an evaporative cooler would work in the dry desert? Swamp it makes sense though.
Thank you,
Jen

monB 11-08-2015 09:22 AM

Dry heat, ought to work very well. I first met swamp/evaporative coolers when I was in west texas, love 'em, in the right place. Always keep an eye open for mold, though, at least I had to in a house.

Mon

Jon in AZ 11-08-2015 09:22 AM

An evaporative cooler works by blowing dry air from outside through water-soaked pads and into the interior. It only works when the relative humidity is low, and requires keeping a window open so many square inches (depending on the size of the unit). It needs a continuous water supply. My trailer had a fitting on the supply hook-up with a small-diameter water line on the outside of the trailer running to the cooler. It uses much less electricity than AC.

Google "evaporative cooler" for more information. You'll want a side-draft type rather than a down-draft, since the Trillium's roof won't support the weight. Out here, you can walk into any big box store and buy one. They're not expensive.

Mikmay 11-08-2015 09:37 AM

The trillium escape hatch window will easily accept most window type air conditioners without much alteration. I would use a air conditioner that balances half in and half out rather than one that sticks mostly out as you won't need as much of support shelf to hold it.A couple of angled flag brackets and wooden dowels with rubber booties on the end will support it easily.

eagle of flight 11-08-2015 09:53 AM

I just returned from living 50 miles from Carlsbad N. M. For 5 months. It also gets a 100 plus there. I have a 13 Ft burro. No shade in the Guadelupes either. I had a 5000 btu ac that did nothing during the day. I up-graded to a 8000 btu. At least that made it tolerable inside during the day. At night the temps outside dropped low enough to not need a c. Most times I was at work during the day anyway. I also had put 2 coats of wax on the burro. The at times 35 to 50 mph winds did not allow me to use an awning or any cover. I also had it bucked down with chains to 4 concrete pads. There were still frightening times that I puckered tight. Good luck. Joe

Felix47 11-08-2015 10:29 AM

I live full time in a Casita right in the middle of the Mohave. I have been here three years. Forget a cover....too much wind. A/C is a joke in this dry weather. 8000 BTU just won't cut it on 110 degree days. I could post a picture but I put the swamp cooler on a tower made of cinder blocks so it blows right into the side window. Simple. On the hottest days it is comfortable in five minutes while my neighbors need hours for their big RVs to cool down using A/C. The swamp cooler makes too much noise for me at night as does A/C but fortunately, it is rare in the Mohave to need A/C at night. I open the door, all the windows and just use a fan if need be and if it is terribly hot during the monsoon I have a portable cot and I sleep outside. If you want a shade just set up a tarp outside but be sure to take it down. The wind can really be fierce and everything gets ripped down. You can use those sun shade cloths that allow wind through or the military camo netting to shade the entrance. Overall, probably the best place in the US to live in an RV.

Rattlesnake Joe 11-08-2015 02:51 PM

Go Underground
 
Take a lesson from the desert animals...go underground. Find some BLM land close by to where you work and dig a slit trench wide enough to back your trailer into. Cover with a nice big camo tarp held down with bowling ball sized rocks or poles with 4 or 5 inches of dirt thrown on top of the poles. Or maybe find a cave or abandoned mine to back into. You want northern exposure for your entrance if possible. You have now saved the expense of living in an RV park but must now erase your truck tracks from your hideout area.

Gennaver 11-08-2015 04:02 PM

Hi all,

Glad to read the replies.

Not sure about evaporative heat going through wet towels because I think the towels would dry up and how would it work if I am not home to get it wet.

Good to know it cools down at night, relief, if I wasn't bringing my new rescue cat I wouldn't need a/c in the day.

I actually think there were 'dugouts' in the ground when I looked online and swear now that there was camo netting spread out at intervals. I thought maybe it was something else but, it was close enough to the RV campgrounds that maybe that was the case? I don't know but, will find out by calling the grounds attendant again.

Thank you,
Jen
edit because I forgot to mention that I'm not sure if Randy's Trillium has an AC or not already?!

Jon in AZ 11-08-2015 04:31 PM

An evaporative cooler has a water reservoir with a float valve (like your toilet), so as long as it's connected to a water supply it will not run dry. I think you could leave it running on a low setting while you're at work. You'd have to leave a window (or perhaps a vent) open.

Gennaver 11-08-2015 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 557635)
An evaporative cooler has a water reservoir with a float valve (like your toilet), so as long as it's connected to a water supply it will not run dry. I think you could leave it running on a low setting while you're at work. You'd have to leave a window (or perhaps a vent) open.


Ah! Thank you

Bob Miller 11-08-2015 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Felix47 (Post 557598)
I live full time in a Casita right in the middle of the Mohave. I have been here three years. Forget a cover....too much wind. A/C is a joke in this dry weather. 8000 BTU just won't cut it on 110 degree days. I could post a picture but I put the swamp cooler on a tower made of cinder blocks so it blows right into the side window. Simple. On the hottest days it is comfortable in five minutes while my neighbors need hours for their big RVs to cool down using A/C. The swamp cooler makes too much noise for me at night as does A/C but fortunately, it is rare in the Mohave to need A/C at night. I open the door, all the windows and just use a fan if need be and if it is terribly hot during the monsoon I have a portable cot and I sleep outside. If you want a shade just set up a tarp outside but be sure to take it down. The wind can really be fierce and everything gets ripped down. You can use those sun shade cloths that allow wind through or the military camo netting to shade the entrance. Overall, probably the best place in the US to live in an RV.


(emphasis added)
Shirley, you are kidding, right?
If not, please tell us why.....




topgun2 11-08-2015 05:14 PM

I believe it was the Wynn's that did a YouTube piece on this year's Burning Man gathering where they talk about and show both swamp coolers and mesh awnings. You might take a look.

Bill

stude 11-08-2015 06:09 PM

Cover
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gennaver (Post 557567)
Hi,
The RV park I am looking to move to, in the Mojave desert, has water, electric but is otherwise bare bones with no cover.

What would you recommend I use as a cover for my anticipated refurbished 1978 Trillium 4500 from Randy? He is out of town for another week and I look forward for some advice.

The rv park is open, and the Mojave reaches 120 in the summer and the cooler at night, depending on the season. I'm worried about schorching the trailer in the sun and heat.

When I looked at the live view from mapquest of the park everyone was just in the open with no cover.

Found this thread--> http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...oot-47816.html

If I Knew I was going to be there quite a while I would look into the Costco Garages they are 12'X20'X10' high at peak try and make up some leg extensions to get a couple more feet higher so whole trailer goes in the covers last about 5 years can be taken down and put back up easily are held together with bungee straps which also wear out but you can buy this stuff in a large roll and same for the plastic balls. Just remake when worn out.
Not all that heavy and can take with u when u move or sell to someone else.
U want some height and leave both ends open so the air can move through to cool off at night. U can open up the door sides and what ever windows open make it so the Costco does the same. They sell in Canada for around $200 or less. No point in making permanent as who knows when u will move onto anther location.
Stude

Borrego Dave 11-08-2015 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stude (Post 557650)
If I Knew I was going to be there quite a while I would look into the Costco Garages they are 12'X20'X10' high at peak try and make up some leg extensions to get a couple more feet higher so whole trailer goes in the covers last about 5 years can be taken down and put back up easily are held together with bungee straps which also wear out but you can buy this stuff in a large roll and same for the plastic balls. Just remake when worn out. Stude


Nice suggestion if you're not living in the desert. A 30 mph wind is called a breeze here and happens often. The wind comes and goes like flipping a light switch. I like it but you have to learn to live with it's whims.

stude 11-08-2015 11:06 PM

Breeze
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Borrego Dave (Post 557684)
Nice suggestion if you're not living in the desert. A 30 mph wind is called a breeze here and happens often. The wind comes and goes like flipping a light switch. I like it but you have to learn to live with it's whims.

so u don't think we get those kinds of breeezes up here, were smart we anchor the costco garage by putting each foot into a bucket of 25 pound cement or gravel in case one wants to use the bucket again. The cover might move around a bit but it aint about to take off to your neighbors down the street or in the next county.
Stude

Borrego Dave 11-09-2015 12:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stude (Post 557704)
so u don't think we get those kinds of breeezes up here, were smart we anchor the costco garage by putting each foot into a bucket of 25 pound cement or gravel in case one wants to use the bucket again. The cover might move around a bit but it aint about to take off to your neighbors down the street or in the next county.
Stude

Well Peter I'm not going to argue with you and that wasn't my point for my response. Just pointing out that when all you have to block the wind is a few cactus' and such you've got to think differently about what you build. Glad your anchors work for you. I've been in the desert for 30 years and the OP's destination is about 100 miles north of me. There have been a few new folks that moved in here that did the same thing as you say. Those covers ended up in the next county, the frame not so far. A neighbors patio roof with a lot more than 25lbs of concrete in the footings ended up on their tile roof with a lot of broken tiles...along with the concrete footings. Local codes here call for 2'x2'x2' footings for patio uprights, I did 3'x3'x2' just cuz and my patio is still here :). There may be ways for the OP to have a cover but it's going to have to be something that lets the wind go through it like military camo netting and not with standard bungies as they only last about two months in the deserts UV.


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