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endtilly 07-07-2018 11:41 AM

Broken Frame - Trillium 2014 by Great West
 
Yesterday, the frame of my very recent Trillium broke. Fortunatly, I was not too far away from home. I have read a lot of postings about broken frame for older Trilliums, and I realized the frame broke exactly at the same place. I'm surprised that Great West did not fix this frame weakness issue. What would be the best way to definitly fix the problem? Is this something other recent Trillium owners have experienced? Thanks!

Boler77 07-07-2018 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by endtilly (Post 705919)
Yesterday, the frame of my very recent Trillium broke. Fortunatly, I was not too far away from home. I have read a lot of postings about broken frame for older Trilliums, and I realized the frame broke exactly at the same place. I'm surprised that Great West did not fix this frame weakness issue. What would be the best way to definitly fix the problem? Is this something other recent Trillium owners have experienced? Thanks!

so just wondering here , is this a "C" channel frame or tubular?

endtilly 07-07-2018 03:47 PM

1 Attachment(s)
It is a tubular frame

John in Michigan 07-07-2018 04:22 PM

Looks like tubular. On our 1978 Trillium 4500 there are "fish plates" welded to the sides of the frame on both sides of the camper at this location. From what I understand, the original Trillium manufacturer actually recalled campers to add these plates for additional strength.

Boler77 07-07-2018 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John in Michigan (Post 706004)
Looks like tubular. On our 1978 Trillium 4500 there are "fish plates" welded to the sides of the frame on both sides of the camper at this location. From what I understand, the original Trillium manufacturer actually recalled campers to add these plates for additional strength.

Hi John

They must have gone with the thinest waal tubing they could go with at the time. I guess to save cost, but wow that looks thin.

Liz in Calgary 07-08-2018 09:59 AM

My 1973 Trillium broke in the same spot. I was in a very remote area in Montana at the time. Had to have it towed out and into Helena where a very good trailer store welded plates on both side to reinforce the frame. Very thankful for some local campers that gave me the name of a tow company and trailer shop.

endtilly 07-08-2018 11:53 AM

Hi Liz, thanks for the info. Would it be possible to send me some photos of the repairs? It might be useful when I go see the garage where I left my Trillium.

kootenaigirl 07-08-2018 02:26 PM

That’s crappy.
Here is the link to the recall on Escape trailers that used the same frame style as the Trillium’s and shows the fix.
3" Frame Recall on 15', 17' & 19' Escape Trailers - Escape Trailer Owners Community

redbarron55 07-08-2018 04:33 PM

All trailers are weaker where the frames bend and should have reinforcement plates welded on.
The Scamps and Casitas as well need to have this reinforcement.
Where the Scamps are bent the tubing is distorted in the inside to allow for the bend.
In the cases of the trailers with a door that is the level of the bottom of the floor the door carry through is usually the same square tubing as the frame turned sideways and although it is the same it is weaker when turned on it's side.
This lets the frame flex and actually causes the cracks on the other side!
Check the bends carefully as well as the welds and reinforcements on either side of the door.
If the street side cracks the driver's side will follow soon.
Fixing the driver's side without inspecting the door area might be short sighted.

endtilly 07-08-2018 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redbarron55 (Post 706191)
All trailers are weaker where the frames bend and should have reinforcement plates welded on.
The Scamps and Casitas as well need to have this reinforcement.
Where the Scamps are bent the tubing is distorted in the inside to allow for the bend.
In the cases of the trailers with a door that is the level of the bottom of the floor the door carry through is usually the same square tubing as the frame turned sideways and although it is the same it is weaker when turned on it's side.
This lets the frame flex and actually causes the cracks on the other side!
Check the bends carefully as well as the welds and reinforcements on either side of the door.
If the street side cracks the driver's side will follow soon.
Fixing the driver's side without inspecting the door area might be short sighted.

Thanks for the advice. The other side is also affected (it was about to break)

David Tilston 07-09-2018 08:10 AM

If you don't learn from mistakes, you are doomed to repeat them:
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...00s-46068.html

This was a problem that Trillium dealt with in the 70's. Don't drill through the frame to mount the trailer, and reinforce the bent part that just happens to be in the highest stress point.

I would be curious about how they did the mounting bolts for the trailer cab.

endtilly 07-09-2018 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Tilston (Post 706300)
If you don't learn from mistakes, you are doomed to repeat them:
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...00s-46068.html

This was a problem that Trillium dealt with in the 70's. Don't drill through the frame to mount the trailer, and reinforce the bent part that just happens to be in the highest stress point.

I would be curious about how they did the mounting bolts for the trailer cab.

This is a question I have for Great West Vans who manufactured the trailer in 2014 (35 years after the recall) ... but they have gone bankrupt... At least, the frame was not drilled to mount the trailer... If I remember, there are 2 "L" shaped metal parts that are welded between the frame. That's where they put the bolts...

Thinh 07-09-2018 03:46 PM

Trillium frame
 
I believe my 1300Trillium has total of 4 bolts tightened b/t shell and frame. Two front bolts are short with big washers/plates bolted thru: 2 brackets (underneath shell) in which they are welded to frame. Other 2 long bolts for the rear are bolted thru: frame of Trillium. Mine are all replaced and also reinforced, but with the following photos you can see 2 brackets welded to frame for front end of shell. Share...
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...ork-57400.html

Thinh 07-09-2018 04:36 PM

Correction for fame bolts of Trillium1300.
 
There are total of 6 bolts b/t shell and frame of Trillium1300. Two front bolts are bolted thru: shell and 2 brackets which are side welded to frame. Four long bolts in the rear are bolted through shell and frame of Trillium. The following thread consists of photos of old bolts after taken out. Share..
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...ild-72986.html

John in Michigan 07-09-2018 05:34 PM

body to frame bolts
 
That's interesting. On my 1978 Trillium 4500 there are 8 bolts, 4 in front, 4 in rear. All eight bolts are attached to L brackets welded to the frame. Also 4 large fish plates at the bend ...

David Tilston 07-09-2018 05:39 PM

Typically 4500's have 8 bolts, and 1300's have 6.

redbarron55 07-09-2018 06:12 PM

Bolts or screws through the top and bottom of the frame will weaken it where a bolt horizontally through the center of the sides will not weaken it nearly as much.
The angles welded on the side keep the bolts from going through the top and bottom of the frame tubing.
Unfortunately welding a bracket on the side of the frame will also stress concentrations which can also lead to cracking.
The brackets should be tapered to spread out the stress.
If one is welding an added brace from side to side at the bend would help reduce the twisting.
A nice long fishplate around the bend would be nice as well.
If it were me and the break was in the straight section I would rebuild the front of the frame and eliminate the bends like this:
https://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/...icture8494.jpg
This is what I cut out of my Scamp, notice all of the repaired cracks.
https://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/...icture9771.jpg
https://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/...icture9772.jpg
The above is from a 1985 Scamp 16 footer and I suspect that cracks and breaks like this are more common than many would realize.
Corrosion between the floor and frame doesn't help any either

Liz in Calgary 07-09-2018 07:37 PM

I can't find the picture of the break on my trailer. However attached is a picture of the welds they did on both sides of my trailer.

As a previous person posted it fish gills they welded to each side. I had to have mine partial grind down once I got home so it wouldn't always scrap on my driveway. Mine I had to have done in an emergency situation so I paid a hefty price. Lesson learned.

endtilly 07-10-2018 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Liz in Calgary (Post 706456)
I can't find the picture of the break on my trailer. However attached is a picture of the welds they did on both sides of my trailer.

As a previous person posted it fish gills they welded to each side. I had to have mine partial grind down once I got home so it wouldn't always scrap on my driveway. Mine I had to have done in an emergency situation so I paid a hefty price. Lesson learned.

I don't see any picture attached to your previous post... Little question: In addition to fish plates, do you remember if they weld additional plates on the side that broke?

Roy in TO 07-15-2018 03:56 PM

I saw a new (5 y/o) GWV Trillium Sidekick (4500 equivalent) at recent bolerama (July 7) that had cracked at the point where the frame bends to form the A at the front. They needed to weld on the road. I sent a link to the owner about this thread.


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