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Old 09-08-2015, 09:44 AM   #21
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As far as inflation charts those are minimum pressures for the weight. Also they are cold pressures. As is the sidewall pressure a cold pressure. When you run minimum pressure you any loss of air puts you under the minimum and possible blow out. Running at maximum give a lot of room.
It's a good idea that at every stop you put your hand on each of tires. If it's hot you need to do something.

One other thing about trailer tires, they are rated for 65 mph max.
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Old 09-08-2015, 10:04 AM   #22
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I'd suggest keeping the inflation of the tow vehicle's tires separate from the trailer's tires. There are many more performance issues with tow vehicle pressures that argue for keeping the manufacturer's inflations.
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Old 09-08-2015, 10:30 AM   #23
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I presume the "50 psi maximum" (that's exactly what it says on the Scamp label) is an upper limit designed to permit satisfactory tire performance at the trailer's maximum load. Oddly, I can't seem to locate a GVWR anywhere, but I do know that late model 13' Scamps use a 2200 pound axle.

Most on-the-road Scamps weigh less than that, total, some a lot less. While there is nothing wrong with running at maximum pressure regardless of load, if it produces an unacceptably harsh ride (and assuming the axle is not the problem), it makes sense to cautiously reduce tire pressure somewhat. The dangers of under-inflation are greater than over-inflation, so I'd recommend an incremental approach. It is always a good thing to know what your trailer really weighs.

Two things can cause the axle to be the problem. One is an aged-out axle. Since your axle is only 5 years old, that's not it. Another is a over-rated axle. Some people, in the mistaken belief that more is always better, will install a heavy-duty axle on a 13' egg. That would also make it ride like a buckboard. If there is a tag on your axle with a serial number, you should be able to determine through the manufacturer whether your axle is appropriately rated for your trailer.
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Old 09-08-2015, 10:45 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post

Two things can cause the axle to be the problem. One is an aged-out axle. Since your axle is only 5 years old, that's not it. Another is a over-rated axle. Some people, in the mistaken belief that more is always better, will install a heavy-duty axle on a 13' egg. That would also make it ride like a buckboard. If there is a tag on your axle with a serial number, you should be able to determine through the manufacturer whether your axle is appropriately rated for your trailer.
Jon- Thanks for the suggestion of looking for a tag on the axle with serial number. The PO outfitted our Scamp to be completely off the grid, so it wouldn't surprise me at all, if he put on a heavy duty axle. At 35 PSI, it towed for 4000 miles like it wasn't even there. At 48 PSI for ten minutes, it was bouncy, bouncy.
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Old 09-08-2015, 10:57 AM   #25
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I queried the google and found this inflation info on Goodyear's website. Click here. Interesting reading.

Also, I found the attached handy Goodyear pdf table. My tires are in the first row and my Scamp's axle weight calls for 30 psi to keep the whole tread width on the pavement. I assumed the tire gurus at Goodyear factored in handling too, though some folks swear that higher inflation improves mileage and loosens rivets. And who knows, maybe engineers were not consulted and the marketing folks wrote and the legal department edited the web page. YMMV

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I try to keep my tires properly inflated, whatever that means since you cannot trust the internet. (I have a super secret number of psi that I mostly keep to.) Also I give them a look at every gas stop to make sure they are not flat, sometimes even going as far as feeling the rubber. This sophisticated hand test finds they are almost always warm in warmer weather and cool in cooler weather and fully inflated all the time. And perhaps taking it a bit over-the-top I check the pressure with a gauge before any trip. Decades of towing experience have taught me that tires roll more smoothly, last longer, and mileage is better with air inside. ;-)

Happy trails, John

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Old 09-08-2015, 11:11 AM   #26
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Only Two Schools of thought ??

Only two schools of thought - Wow Zowee !

OK - I can understand immediately that the 25 lb sticker is most likely an original sticker and relates to bias belted tires .... Will probably leave it there - just for grins !

Think I will keep the tire pressure at 33 and check the tire temp at each stop along the route - about 400 miles - maybe 8 hrs +/- including stops. May adjust along the way / may not !

I towed it home from Ill a few yrs ago - using higher tire pressure with out incident - but it had nothing in it to bounce around . Since then it has been an occasional project trailer ( replaced the stove + refrig - Removed and re bedded all opening windows and roof vents in buytal (sp?) rubber ( except the smallest by the stove) , replaced and rewired the interior and exterior lights - and stopped the leaking front and rear windows - and put a PVC plank across the width of the back - removed the water tank (which is a pain anyway - to me at least - will use bottled water from local grocery ) .
Also abandoned the furnace and front mounted propane tanks - will use only the 1 lb cans ( since I intend only short term camping and walmarts ae ubiquitous !) Made an awning etc . Now to try it all out and find out where I went wrong and what else I need to acquire or fix - One is never done with a trailer or a boat .....

Many thanks for the discussion and the breadth of your knowledgeable opinions.

See you 'round the bend ,
Ken
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:22 AM   #27
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1] Install appropriate sized and rated tires.
2] Inflate your trailer tires to sidewall pressure.
3] Enjoy optimum tire life and safety.
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:27 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by John Linck View Post
I queried the google and found this inflation info on Goodyear's website. Click here.

Also, this attached handy pdf table.

YMMV and such discussions can be as perilous as talking religion. Use care.

I try to keep my tires properly inflated, whatever that means.

John

I think there's a reading comprehension problem here. "TIRE LOAD LIMITS (LBS) AT VARIOUS COLD INFLATION PRESSURES (PSI)" What does that mean. To me it means that at weight and pressure limits posted in that chart are the threshold between safe and unsafe. If I miss on the weight I could be easily over the limit. I add extra clothes and some canned food when I was at the limit, those thing could put me over the limit. As with many things it's good to stay away from thresholds. In this case, tires should be inflated well above the limit, but not above the maximum side wall. Which would mean at side wall pressure when cold. (first thing in the morning before moving the trailer.)
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:28 AM   #29
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Ken, if you haven't yet I'd get your trailer weighed, preferably loaded for travel.

Also, what do you know about the age, condition, and rating of your axle?
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Old 09-08-2015, 12:28 PM   #30
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[QUOTE=Jon Vermilye;546987]As you may have discovered from the replies to your question, there are two schools of thought on tire inflation, and each has its proponents & defenders.

The first is to inflate the tires to their sidewall maximum pressure ratings (assuming that the wheels are rated for that pressure). This provides the maximum weight rating of the tire, reduces flexing which may reduce heating, and provides a safety margin if you have a small leak.

The second is to use tire manufacturer tables to match the inflation to the weight on the tire. ]

Forget the first. Go with the second! The only time you want the max pressure is IF you are carrying the MAX LOAD. Ya gotta weigh the trailer to know what the weight is on each tire. Then go to the load/inflation chart.
A hard tire bounces more - think "super ball". A hard tire is more susceptible to damage from road hazards like rocks or sharp pot holes. They can cause the cords in the tire to break resulting in a bulge and blow out.

My rule of thumb is to put in just enough air to remove most - but not all - of the sidewall bulge. Then drive 50 or so miles at highway speeds. Stop, and feel the tire sidewalls. Slightly warm? Good. Hot? Add air. Cold? let out some air.
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Old 09-08-2015, 12:42 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
I think there's a reading comprehension problem here. "TIRE LOAD LIMITS (LBS) AT VARIOUS COLD INFLATION PRESSURES (PSI)" What does that mean. To me it means that at weight and pressure limits posted in that chart are the threshold between safe and unsafe. If I miss on the weight I could be easily over the limit. I add extra clothes and some canned food when I was at the limit, those thing could put me over the limit. As with many things it's good to stay away from thresholds. In this case, tires should be inflated well above the limit, but not above the maximum side wall. Which would mean at side wall pressure when cold. (first thing in the morning before moving the trailer.)
You have it right!
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Old 09-08-2015, 08:18 PM   #32
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makes no sense

I run my tires at 50 psi. Why is that tire manufacturers continue to print the very important max psi of their tires in the smallest font possible? Than in a large font they print some stupid product name like 'tow master' or 'tow king'.
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Old 09-08-2015, 08:32 PM   #33
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[QUOTE=Wayne Collins;547066]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Vermilye View Post
As you may have discovered from the replies to your question, there are two schools of thought on tire inflation, and each has its proponents & defenders.

The first is to inflate the tires to their sidewall maximum pressure ratings (assuming that the wheels are rated for that pressure). This provides the maximum weight rating of the tire, reduces flexing which may reduce heating, and provides a safety margin if you have a small leak.

The second is to use tire manufacturer tables to match the inflation to the weight on the tire. ]

Forget the first. Go with the second! The only time you want the max pressure is IF you are carrying the MAX LOAD. Ya gotta weigh the trailer to know what the weight is on each tire. Then go to the load/inflation chart.
A hard tire bounces more - think "super ball". A hard tire is more susceptible to damage from road hazards like rocks or sharp pot holes. They can cause the cords in the tire to break resulting in a bulge and blow out.

My rule of thumb is to put in just enough air to remove most - but not all - of the sidewall bulge. Then drive 50 or so miles at highway speeds. Stop, and feel the tire sidewalls. Slightly warm? Good. Hot? Add air. Cold? let out some air.
With this method you must, I MEAN MUST, weigh your trailer everytime you move it. OK if that's what to do.
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Old 09-08-2015, 10:39 PM   #34
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[QUOTE=Byron Kinnaman;547159]
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With this method you must, I MEAN MUST, weigh your trailer everytime you move it. OK if that's what to do.

Being my loaded weight only differs +/- by 50 pounds from normal, a reweigh between trips would be a moot point. Kind of sounds like splitting hairs to me.
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Old 09-09-2015, 12:46 AM   #35
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[QUOTE=Borrego Dave;547193]
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Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post


Being my loaded weight only differs +/- by 50 pounds from normal, a reweigh between trips would be a moot point. Kind of sounds like splitting hairs to me.

That's pretty good for a +/- 20 lb scale.
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Old 09-09-2015, 01:00 AM   #36
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[QUOTE=Borrego Dave;547193]
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Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post


Being my loaded weight only differs +/- by 50 pounds from normal, a reweigh between trips would be a moot point. Kind of sounds like splitting hairs to me.

OK let's see if this is even possible. Just between and empty and full fresh 12 gallon water tank is 96lb lbls. An empty or full gray water 18gallons is 140 lbs. A full and an empty propane tank 20lb two would be 40 lbs.
Truck scales weight in 20 lb increments.
Conclusion... +/- 50lbs not likely.

If you're runing class b or c tires it would really easy go from say 25psi minimum to 30 pis minimum and you'd never know it if you didn't weigh the trailer every time you put it on the road. When you leave either a campground or home you would need to weigh to know if your below the minimum.
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Old 09-09-2015, 02:44 AM   #37
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Byron, I always leave the house with a full 25 gallons of water in my SD 17 and full LP tanks and really only use a few gallons of LP on any trip. Yup, my 50 # statement is correct. A few different snacks and clothes are all that change in my case. Should probably remove the second LP tank as I really don't need it and then reweigh. I come home with the same amount of water just in different tanks and pretty much always have the same things along with me is why I stated reweighing for me is moot. I agree with you to the scales readings having a certain pound scale and not exact numbers but within 20 or so pounds is fine when you're weighing an 18 wheeler as an example. You could do exactly what you say to do and still have a problem some where down the road with tires. You do realize that everything made that has limits on it is no where close to what the failure rate is from their testing, some as much as 100% for safety reasons such as in crane lifting cables. That would be really dumb on any manufactures part and be open to a lot of law suits. NOT saying to go over board but just getting close with tires should be fine. So I have to say again, for most of us a reweigh is a moot point and going overboard. Haven't read of only a few here that have had a problem with tires over many miles all over NA. The age of tires sure seems to be a bigger issue than inflation.
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Old 09-09-2015, 05:06 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
I think there's a reading comprehension problem here. "TIRE LOAD LIMITS (LBS) AT VARIOUS COLD INFLATION PRESSURES (PSI)" What does that mean. To me it means that at weight and pressure limits posted in that chart are the threshold between safe and unsafe. If I miss on the weight I could be easily over the limit. I add extra clothes and some canned food when I was at the limit, those thing could put me over the limit. As with many things it's good to stay away from thresholds. In this case, tires should be inflated well above the limit, but not above the maximum side wall. Which would mean at side wall pressure when cold. (first thing in the morning before moving the trailer.)
Or, don't load the trailer to the limit. For a trailer the inflation is chosen to carry the GAWR loads. If your vehicle is loaded to less than GAWR then adding a few extra cans of beans & franks and some BVDs aren't going to put you over the tire's limits. (In Fred's weight file I kinda wish for an axle GAWR column.I did screen for Casita's I'm fairly sure I know the GAWR for and none exceeded.) Unless, as you say, you're loaded up to the GAWR before you add those few cans of guilty pleasure.
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Old 09-09-2015, 06:11 AM   #39
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I set them at 50 lbs, their maximum pressure.

My answer was short, it requires a little more explanation. I do suggest weighing your trailer, weighing your tongue as well as greasing your bearings, and knowing your tire's age. All are important.

I have my tires at max pressure because the primary goal is to support the load. I seek load margin.

No matter how carefully you load your trailer, the load on a specific tire changes depending on road conditions. Occasionally the entire load of the trailer may be on one tire.

When we began traveling in a trailer one of my concerns was the single axle nature of our trailers. Losing a tire seemed like a potential disaster. As a result we've been particularly careful with tires (and after 8 years of extensive travel had not had a tire failure).

We do small things to make the tires more effective. We don't drive at high speeds. We drive early in the day to keep tire temperatures down. We regularly check tires and lug nuts. We have temperature and pressure sensors on our tires. We 'touch' check the tire hubs every time we stop.
Occasionally I get down and look at the tires for uneven wear.

None of these efforts cost much or take much time. All little things that can make the difference. I'm sure I missed mentioning something. What it amounts to is becoming conscious about there presence and importance.
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Old 09-12-2015, 09:09 PM   #40
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50 PSI tire Pressure

My tire dealer was hesitant to put 50 PSI in my new tires, but did so when I insisted. My receipt showed on it that the "tires were inflated to 50 PSI at customers request". So the dealer has a CYA, but why the hesitancy to inflate to the stated sidewall pressure???
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