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Old 11-27-2017, 02:37 PM   #1
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Craftsman Tools

Craftsman tools has been sold to Stanley. It's my understanding Sears is still selling the brand as is K Mart. I've also seen them at Ace. I'm wondering what has happened to the warranty. The Sears around here have closed. At one time you walked into the store with the broken tool and walked out with a new one. Anyone done that lately? Raz
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Old 11-27-2017, 02:43 PM   #2
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Sears Canada is going out of business. They no longer honor their extended warranties. US Sears is separate.
Note also that customers of Sears Canada are complaining that items being liquidated have had lower price regular tags replaced with higher price sale tags.
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Old 11-27-2017, 03:10 PM   #3
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Don’t know about the warranty, but Craftsman tool are now manufactured overseas and I have been told that the quality is not the same as when they were manufactured in the U.S.A. I’m not sure if I would purchase any more Craftsman tools. Unfortunately, the alternatives are rather pricey.
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Old 11-27-2017, 03:14 PM   #4
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I have many older Craftsman tools, most of which I've had for 30-40 years. Back then they made real quality tools, and they were made in the USA. The new stuff is all imported Chinese junk. And forget about any warranties. All I know is I'm hanging onto my old stuff, and I won't be buying any of the new stuff. I guess it's a true saying "They don't make them like they used to." Sad.
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Old 11-27-2017, 03:23 PM   #5
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I have outlived at least four "lifetime" warranties on hand tools!
In the case of S-K (originally S-K Dresser), more than once.
Anyone remember Duro-Chrome?

I never really liked Craftsman hand tools but boy were they ever cheap compared to the better stuff... and they still beat the crap out of Buffalo or Harbor Freight. Cheap tools are often just injuries lurking in your tool box, but a hundred bucks for a 1/4" ratchet can be shocking!
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Old 11-27-2017, 03:25 PM   #6
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Maybe if you stopped buying cheap tools etc. you could bring back manufacturing to the U.S.
Or maybe not.
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Old 11-27-2017, 04:18 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
Maybe if you stopped buying cheap tools etc. you could bring back manufacturing to the U.S.
Or maybe not.
Well that, and a few other things would have to change - maybe more than a few. But generally I like the idea of trying to buy goods made in your home country whenever possible.
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Old 11-27-2017, 04:33 PM   #8
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Stanley owns Black and Decker, Dewalt, Porter Cable and now Crapsman. I wonder how many other brands they own.

I have purchased Snap On branded items that are made in China and just the other day saw Buck Knives with the made in china on them. The companies that were so proud of the Made In America have prostituted themselves for more profit.

Another Note: On TV the other day they stated Nissan no longer makes vehicles in Japan. My Wife's Frontier pickup was put together in Tennessee.
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Old 11-27-2017, 05:01 PM   #9
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20 or 30 years ago, Stanley had the slogan "Proudly made in the U.S.A" on all their packaging. Today, most if not all Stanley Tools come from Asia. Same with Master Locks and lots of other tool and hardware brands. Brand names used to mean something, but not any more.

The only good news here is that in the past, Asian tools were low quality crap., but today they are a much higher grade of crap.
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Old 11-27-2017, 05:38 PM   #10
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My local sears is still in business and still will trade in the broken Craftsman tools but you get the inferior Chinese Craftsman stuff. Last October I traded in some items. Their inventory is starting to get severely limited and expensive.

I have in the last year went through my Craftsman tools and replacing missing, lost and damaged Craftsman tools while they are still available on the cheep in the used markets. Now in the stores you are seeing the expansion of Stanley branded mechanic tools. Used Craftsman tools are a bargain over used high end tools. They all do the same job as long as they don't break.
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Old 11-27-2017, 05:46 PM   #11
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The issue with many tools is not where they are made as much as the expected quality of steel that the company requires, and a quality check that insures that they meet those standards. It is the specs that make it good or junk, and price determines how they are made. Just like many more expensive places to buy some tools, you can get cheaper tools with good names, they usually have a different number on them, and they have different winding in the motors, etc. If someone is only going to use the tool a few times, they buy really cheap ones, use twice and throw away. Many companies are responding to this by producing the least cost tools that they can.
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Old 11-27-2017, 05:53 PM   #12
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They all do the same job as long as they don't break.[/QUOTE]

I have to disagree on this, on some tools at least. I have both Craftsman and Snap-on tubing wrenches. The Craftsmans will slip where the Snap-on's will not and the Craftsmans are at least 10 years old so not the foreign made ones. Other Craftsman tools that I have work fine, but I prefer SK, Snap-on, or Mac. I also have some Cornwell screwdrivers that I like better than the Snap-on's
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Old 11-27-2017, 06:07 PM   #13
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My old Craftsman ratchets worked much better than the new ones, I think the springs were a lot stronger to hold the inside better. I also feel that if the steel is not the right kind, the edge of a lot of tools don't hold, and in many of the hand wood tools, dull is dangerous.
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Old 11-27-2017, 06:14 PM   #14
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Well that, and a few other things would have to change - maybe more than a few. But generally I like the idea of trying to buy goods made in your home country whenever possible.
Unless you live in China?
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:44 PM   #15
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Well that, and a few other things would have to change - maybe more than a few. But generally I like the idea of trying to buy goods made in your home country whenever possible.
It's a nice idea, but the reality is different. Price sells to the majority of folks.

Two identical toasters, one is 10 bux and the other is 25 bux. The lower one will way outsell the higher one. Only difference is one was made overseas. The internal quality may be different, but how do you judge that in the store? And further, every toaster you look at is made overseas because they all understand the game. So, most of the time, there is no "domestic" option.

No business can compete if everyone else selling the same thing is selling it for half as much. And half as much means built overseas.

The choice for businesses is: build it here and go out of business or build it overseas and stay alive. The answer is obvious.

Used to be, Craftsman had tools that were guaranteed and only sold at Sears. Now they have different quality levels and they are sold at different stores that sometimes won't honor the guarantee because they have no affiliation with Sears, or because Sears is going out of business. Sears is just barely ahead of Harbor Freight, and in some cases, behind them.

BTW, I don't feel a bit sorry for Sears. They, in large part, have driven themselves out of business by being dishonest and by cheapening their products. It has nothing to do with the point of origin of their stuff.

Unless we have tariffs or import restrictions, we'll keep buying foreign wrenches and toasters. If we do have restrictions we'll pay higher prices. Which is better?

Competition has to be based on more than how cheap wrenches can be made, it has to be also about technology. What can we make that nobody else knows how to make?

I just read that Toyotas built here are not as profitable as the ones built in Japan. So the word is coming down that they either get it done cheaper or the factory might close. Cheaper probably means lower wages and benefits.

Walmart employees are already making so little that they can get food stamps. So the community is supporting them indirectly. They make so little that they can't afford to shop anywhere else but Walmart. Which toaster do you think a Walmart employee will pick? Cheaper is the better choice. Or the only choice.
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:59 PM   #16
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They all do the same job as long as they don't break.
I have to disagree on this, on some tools at least. I have both Craftsman and Snap-on tubing wrenches. The Craftsmans will slip where the Snap-on's will not and the Craftsmans are at least 10 years old so not the foreign made ones. Other Craftsman tools that I have work fine, but I prefer SK, Snap-on, or Mac. I also have some Cornwell screwdrivers that I like better than the Snap-on's[/QUOTE]

I've only run into Snap-on, and Mac on the tool trucks. SK you can find once in a while. It's hard to find good hand tools unless your a mechanic.
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Old 11-27-2017, 08:01 PM   #17
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Raz, I recently exchanged a stripped 1/4” drive Craftsman ratchet for a replacement at the scaled down Sears store here. Surprisingly, the one I received was of much better quality than the broken tool. I don’t have much hope that this will be a long term option though.
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Old 11-27-2017, 08:19 PM   #18
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[/QUOTE]
I have to disagree on this, on some tools at least. I have both Craftsman and Snap-on tubing wrenches. The Craftsmans will slip where the Snap-on's will not and the Craftsmans are at least 10 years old so not the foreign made ones. Other Craftsman tools that I have work fine, but I prefer SK, Snap-on, or Mac. I also have some Cornwell screwdrivers that I like better than the Snap-on's[/QUOTE]

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >

Ditto! Its quality and design.
I still love my S-K ratchets, strong with small heads and fine teeth.
I too have S-K and Snap-on along with Matco and a dozen other brands.
In fifty years of turning wrenches every mechanic develops favorites which do their jobs best without injury or breakage and damage to equipment.
They certainly do not all do the same job equally well.

Something which I find tempting in my old age are the newer sockets with the Large print Laser Labels for size and type... Problem is I already have way more than plenty of the old style.
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Old 11-27-2017, 08:34 PM   #19
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The sale of the Craftsman line to SB&D was back in January but it's unclear if SB&D will honor the original warranties or not, although it is expected they will. Craftsman is currently sold though Sears, K-Mart, Ace and Orchard Supply Hardware (OSH) but as of last month, it was reported that SB&D was courting Lowes as a new retailer for the line. If that comes to be, and SB&D decides to honor the existing warranty on tools sold before the ownership change, this could be good news for consumers.
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Old 11-27-2017, 09:52 PM   #20
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We have lost a lot of our steel mills in recent years. If we are going to recover the jobs such as tool manufacturing that use steel then that is an issue that must be addressed. No domestic steel production equals no domestic manufacturing of tools. The tools are made where the steel production is happening because that is the most cost effective way of making them. This is a what came first, chicken or the egg situation. Less demand due to lower cost goods equal less steel production. No steel production means it is difficult to recover the tool making industry.

https://www.worldsteel.org/en/dam/jc...gures+2017.pdf
Look at the pie chart for the year 2016 that is found on page 6 of the report, compare it to earlier years. Notice what the change is as relates to the US/North America.
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