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Old 04-08-2018, 09:00 PM   #41
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There is no vinyl on the walls and ceiling of an Oliver. It’s fiberglass. Most think of it as a blank canvas to hang all sorts of art, pictures, fabric, etc. The walls and ceiling and cabinets are all part of the inner hulls.

I like the the interior of the Escapes, too. Both can be cozy. Mike
Sorry about my confusing use of the pronouns. I was referring to Escape's vinyl.
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:15 PM   #42
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If you say so Steve. These is how Scamp pulls the trailer out of the mold and puts the two halves together.
Escape's claim to fame is the fact they keep the two halves together in the moulds while bonding them. This keeps the halves perfectly lined opposed t to having to realign them while bonding. A small thing that can make a big difference.
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:59 PM   #43
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Escape's claim to fame is the fact they keep the two halves together in the moulds while bonding them. This keeps the halves perfectly lined opposed t to having to realign them while bonding. A small thing that can make a big difference.
That's one difference, yes. There are of course many others, like not using rivets, glassing in wooden supports to attach all interior components, and a full shell on the bottom as well. The list of other differences is long. I'm not saying that the differences are earth-shatteringly better, only that major construction differences exist, and the two brands are not the same.
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Old 04-09-2018, 04:28 AM   #44
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We have been to Backus MN and watched Scamps being assembled. We have been to Rice texas and watched Casita's being assembled . We watched the 15 minutes video showing an Escape being assembled . To be honest there isn't a lot of difference between the three .
At all 3 businesses I saw the same attention to detail and the same hurry up and get it done . To me the biggest difference between a Scamp , Casita and Escape is the location where they are built.
I finally got to watch the video. Thank you Robert for posting it. Fun to watch. I've seen the Scamp video and the Jayco video. What strikes me is they are all hand made. Very labor intensive. Just like the model T. I'm sure they all have build errors that are covered up. Let's face it, they are not going to trash a trailer because someone misdrills a hole. And they all use the same "RV stuff". I suspect Steve's observation is pretty close to the mark. I doubt taking delivery of a new trailer isn't any less exciting at one location over the other.
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Old 04-09-2018, 06:59 AM   #45
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Thats an important point. Regardless of how much you spend, or how deluxe a trailer might be, they all buy appliances from the same handful of suppliers.

The newer manufacturers do have an advantage that they are not locked in to an antiquated manufacturing process, or a less optimal design.
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Old 04-09-2018, 08:09 AM   #46
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Thats an important point. Regardless of how much you spend, or how deluxe a trailer might be, they all buy appliances from the same handful of suppliers.
Truth, but then look at the different price point items within those appliance manufacturers.

Scamp, for instance, installs the least expensive Dometic roof air conditioner. A big ole box on the roof. And then you must be hooked up to power (all roof A/Cs) or power it with a 3000 watt generator! A Honda 3000 watt generator is $2,000 and so dang heavy I can't lift it. Escape installs a more expensive and lower profile A/C that can be powered by a $1,000 2000 watt Honda generator that I can lift. The $$ savings between Scamp and Escape is $1,000 to Escape. There would be no way I'd have Scamp install the A/C. YMMC

It's REALLY important to look at what's standard and what is an option when buying a trailer.
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Old 04-09-2018, 08:29 AM   #47
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are those wooden board put in there for attaching cabinents and things I don't think they are part of the support.


to me makes a better trailer


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Old 04-09-2018, 08:31 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
Truth, but then look at the different price point items within those appliance manufacturers.

Scamp, for instance, installs the least expensive Dometic roof air conditioner. A big ole box on the roof. And then you must be hooked up to power (all roof A/Cs) or power it with a 3000 watt generator! A Honda 3000 watt generator is $2,000 and so dang heavy I can't lift it. Escape installs a more expensive and lower profile A/C that can be powered by a $1,000 2000 watt Honda generator that I can lift. The $$ savings between Scamp and Escape is $1,000 to Escape. There would be no way I'd have Scamp install the A/C. YMMC

It's REALLY important to look at what's standard and what is an option when buying a trailer.
Interesting! I am in the midst of buying a generator. I'd much prefer the smaller/lighter Honda 2200 (they just upped the 2000 to 2200). I had been planning on buying the 3000 model. Donna, do you have any links to success with the 2000?


All-new Honda EU2200i Super Quiet Series Generator Delivers Customers More Power for Work, Home or Play, With the Same Legendary Honda Quality and Reliability - Honda.com
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Old 04-09-2018, 08:36 AM   #49
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i wish my 13f scamper didn't have any on the top i would rather have a 5k window job mounted down low!


but then i don't need it since was are boondockers!!


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Old 04-09-2018, 08:40 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by thrifty bill View Post
Interesting! I am in the midst of buying a generator. I'd much prefer the smaller/lighter Honda 2200 (they just upped the 2000 to 2200). I had been planning on buying the 3000 model. Donna, do you have any links to success with the 2000?


All-new Honda EU2200i Super Quiet Series Generator Delivers Customers More Power for Work, Home or Play, With the Same Legendary Honda Quality and Reliability - Honda.com
No, not for the Scamp. Everything I know about a Scamp A/C and generators needed to run, I've found in the Facebook groups. I just find it appalling that a huge generator is needed. Oh MY!
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Old 04-09-2018, 08:48 AM   #51
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Originally Posted by thrifty bill View Post
Interesting! I am in the midst of buying a generator. I'd much prefer the smaller/lighter Honda 2200 (they just upped the 2000 to 2200). I had been planning on buying the 3000 model. Donna, do you have any links to success with the 2000?


All-new Honda EU2200i Super Quiet Series Generator Delivers Customers More Power for Work, Home or Play, With the Same Legendary Honda Quality and Reliability - Honda.com
I would suggest you check the "Casita Forum" There are numerous threads on generators there , especially the Honda EU 2000.
The majority of Casita owners live in Texas and Florida where hot weather is the norm so A/C is a must .
If it was me I would look at the 2500 watt Yamaha generator.
We found in commercial / industrial usage that the Yamaha outperformed the Honda especially in cold weather.
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Old 04-09-2018, 09:04 AM   #52
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Casita and Escape ACs run on 2000i

We had a 2014 Casita and now we have a 2017 Escape 21. I moved the Honda 2000i generator from the Casita to the Escape. We used it to run the AC on both trailers.

However we found that the Casita Mach 8 AC started easily on the generator with just a little bog down, where as the Escape Dometic Penguin II low profile AC really bogged down the generator when it started. To counter this, I installed the MicroAir Soft Start mod in the Escape AC. Now when it starts the generator easily picks up the slowly increasing load.

The generator runs both AC without problems, provided there are no other significant electrical loads.
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Old 04-09-2018, 09:27 AM   #53
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To counter this, I installed the MicroAir Soft Start mod in the Escape AC.
That MicroAir soft starter is a nice piece of equipment. Not to drift too far off topic Richard, but did you install the board only model or the one that's enclosed?
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Old 04-09-2018, 11:15 AM   #54
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That MicroAir soft starter is a nice piece of equipment. Not to drift too far off topic Richard, but did you install the board only model or the one that's enclosed?
I installed the enclosed model. I'm not smart enough to figure out how to connect and enclose the board only. The instructions were easy to follow, especially with help from a person who had already installed one.
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Old 04-09-2018, 10:56 PM   #55
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Great video. Looks like Escape builds a quality product.

When wood is glassed in or resin-impregnated I would not lose a minute of sleep regarding rot. I've owned a 25-year-old boat with such "stringers" glassed into the hull, right in the bilge no less, with zero issues. I was disappointed that Escape's floor is still just cheap plywood (as opposed to marine grade) with vinyl on top. Of all the things to make out of wood, why the floor, and why such a low grade of plywood? I guess to save weight/price?

Someone above mentioned that the cabinets are not structural, but that is not true at least in the case of Escape...they support the rigidity of the shell. I don't see that as a problem FWIW.

I really like the design of the Escape 19. To me it is the ideal layout. My wife however vetoed it because of the pervasive oak wood..."the 80's just called, they want their interior back." We seriously considered buying it anyway and painting / re-veneering it with a grain and color we like better.

If I could have any interior motif it'd be yacht-like. They often have bright white fiberglass walls along with fabric headliner, richly varnished cabinetry, teak and holly floor, etc. I may end up trying to do wood veneer and fabric headliner in our Oliver after a few years. But probably not... knowing me I'll just learn to live with the sterility. And yes I get the whole "blank canvas" thing, and I think it's perfect for the walls, but having the cabinets and ceiling stark white too make it just a little too much.

Look at some of the interiors on Australian or European "caravans". Many have that clean modern look but still with the warmth of wood. Why doesn't anybody build such a thing here? Other than Airstream, I guess.
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Old 04-10-2018, 01:19 AM   #56
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Mike,

I agree with you on the ideal interior being yacht-like. I finished out my Cascade 42 ketch with Honduras mahogany. The deep varnished, red toned mahog, bronze and stainless were beautiful.

After having a number of trailers, the interiors have all been disappointing. Plastic simulated wood trims, etc. All wanting to fall apart as soon as possible, but looking nice in the beginning.

Oliver makes no pretense about reminding you of some other era or a yacht. They provide beautifully built function. I find myself admiring their smooth gelcoated glasswork, perfect fit, and wondering how they did it. Visitors are always running their fingers over the surface in admiration.

While camping out in some remote spot, the value is the efficiency and the workmanship and the great outdoors that we can visit in comfort. The value has never been, with the Oliver anyway, whether or not it remonds me of a mountain cabin. I have never once looked around for a piece of plastic with a picture of wood on it. Who cares? The great outdoors is right there, out the door.

Our last trailer was a Thor toy hauler. I had great hopes for it. And it even had simulated wood inside! But the first trip to Death Valley nearly killed it. Everything was falling apart and trying to fail. It was very clear that we had to get rid of it and not go again, or find a better design. That's when we bought our Oliver.

On trips, the beauty and reason for going is outside. The trailer supports that endeavour. The inside takes care of us when the weather sets in or after a long day of exploring. My wife constantly marvels at how easy our Ollie is to clean. We love how bright and airy the interior is. At night, cold, with the lights out and the wind howling, or raining, the interior feels so secure and warm. Once in a while the heater clicking on, branches swaying and wind whistling outside. I cannot think of once waking up disappointed with the smooth bright interior. It truly is a comfortable cabin in the wild and it doesn't have to have a picture of wood to be feel warm.

Looking forward to a report from you after you get your beautiful new Oliver.
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Old 04-10-2018, 09:03 AM   #57
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Great video. Looks like Escape builds a quality product.

When wood is glassed in or resin-impregnated I would not lose a minute of sleep regarding rot. I've owned a 25-year-old boat with such "stringers" glassed into the hull, right in the bilge no less, with zero issues. I was disappointed that Escape's floor is still just cheap plywood (as opposed to marine grade) with vinyl on top. Of all the things to make out of wood, why the floor, and why such a low grade of plywood? I guess to save weight/price.
At least itís not OSB like others use, I would gladly pay the difference for a better material in the floor, itís not that much material so itís not that much more.
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Old 04-10-2018, 10:01 AM   #58
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On trips, the beauty and reason for going is outside. The trailer supports that endeavour. The inside takes care of us when the weather sets in or after a long day of exploring.
Agreed... far more concerned about functionality and durability than pretty inside the camper. With any luck I won't do much more than sleep in there.
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Old 04-10-2018, 10:41 AM   #59
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our trailer

our 13f scamper is a 95 it is now 23 years old I have not seen any area of rot anywhere I did see where water had come down a window but that is it!

I have pulled up things front to back working on wiring see nothing! I guess scamp must have put plywood in the floor I haven't checked.

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Old 04-10-2018, 11:23 AM   #60
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Steve,
Yeah. It remindes me of one of the last trips in our toy hauler, visiting the Bristlecome Pines. Incredible place. We set up camp at about 8,500' elevation in an empty meadow campground. Evening was settling in and clouds building. Built a fire and got it good and hot. Sat down with a brew to review the day and marvel at the forest. The trees in a swirling breeze have so much to say.

The awesome power of the high forest never disappoints, and in this case, a very special forest indeed. Trees nearly 5,000 years old, gnarled and bent, hanging on through one more season and growing in a dolomite soil that once was a sea bed, now at 10,000 ft elevation in the Sierra. Researchers reach back through time, combining tree ring records from living trees, dead but standing trees and downed trees, to nearly 12,000 years ago. Right where I was sitting, the place looked about the same, 12,000 years ago. But that was just a blink compared to the age of the ancient sea bottom, now at this elevation. A timeless place. Meanwhile the wind whispered and the snow began to fall. Soon I was covered in white and scooching closer to the fire, refusing to give in. Finally, I ventured inside to warm up and dry off, but found myself looking out the window and still hearing the wind swirl. The fire crackled on into the night sending a warm light through the window. I was glad I didn't have to sleep outside, but thrilled to be there.

How nice to be able to stay out as long as possible, then retire to a little cabin. All enveloped in a surrounding beyond comprehension. Then easily move the cabin to another spot and another experience.
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