Escape verses Oliver - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 05-08-2017, 07:12 PM   #21
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We looked at an Oliver . It was well built and well engineered but the layout appeared to be just a Casita on steroids . We like traveling and camping but we can do that without spending 60 K on a trailer
The Oliver is a quality trailer but more than we need or want .
We like the Escape's layout and it fits our style of camping but the quality doesn't match up with the price.
Until we can find a trailer that has the guality , features and layout we desire and at a fair price our money will stay in the bank..
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Old 05-08-2017, 07:31 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
We looked at an Oliver . It was well built and well engineered but the layout appeared to be just a Casita on steroids . We like traveling and camping but we can do that without spending 60 K on a trailer
The Oliver is a quality trailer but more than we need or want .
We like the Escape's layout and it fits our style of camping but the quality doesn't match up with the price.
Until we can find a trailer that has the guality , features and layout we desire and at a fair price our money will stay in the bank..
Assuming you want one, keep your eye open for a used Elite ll. 60K is up there. Then when you factor in the wait and the trip to get it, sheesh. When you find a used one, you'll have to be ready to act on it or it will be gone.
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Old 05-08-2017, 07:59 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Dwainkitchens View Post
As I shared in another forum, I am just beginning my research, and it appears from what I am reading the Oliver is the better built, but almost doubles the price. I am wondering if the Oliver four ply of FG is important if I don't intend to be in frigid temperatures. It appears the connecters and hardware is superior on the Oliver, but for the price of an Oliver, you could replace these pieces often on an Escape. It also appears that the Oliver would be the best in quality, second would be the Escape in FG trailers. Would those on this forum agree? It appears to me that it gets down to what one can afford. I would like to know what you as an Escape owner thinks, if paying the extra price for an Oliver, would be worth it and if there are any other reasons besides cost for choosing the Escape. I am thinking of a unit between 17-21 at the most.

Thanks so much for info!

Dwain
It sounds like you have answered your own questions to the satisfaction of the only one who matters... you!
Your assumptions can take you over half way to a decision. Then you only have to sit back, relax, and let rationalization finish the job.
You write the check, so decide what you like, buy it, then decide to like what you bought!(works every time)
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Old 05-08-2017, 08:37 PM   #24
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Thanks everyone for your input!
I defintely appreciate ALL your thoughts.
I have lots to think about, and much more reserch to do, and then go to some FG rallys. I am sure seeing them will definitely help us in our decision. But all of your input has been very helpful!
Thanks again!
Blessing to everyone!
Dwain
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Old 05-08-2017, 09:12 PM   #25
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Both have their advantages. The Escape is about 40% less money, has dual axles on its 19 foot trailer, lighter weight and larger dinettes.

The Oliver IMHO is the best built molded trailer right now.

Whether the difference in quality justifies the price is up to you. Realize that 40 year old molded trailers built to a lower standard than either of them are still around and being used. Taken care of, a new Scamp, Casita, Escape and Oliver will all be around 40 years from now.

Resale wise it's a push. All four brands do well as do all other brands I can think of. 45 year old Burros are being sold today at four times the original price (or even higher)!

Also, do not overlook floor plan. Once you have had a few trailers, you will know what layouts you like and what you don't like. I much prefer a dinette at one end and a large bed at the other. Escape 19, 21, and Scamp Deluxe 16 layouts are best for me.
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Old 05-08-2017, 09:26 PM   #26
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Is there an advantage to a double axle, or does this just depend on weight of trailer?
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Old 05-08-2017, 10:03 PM   #27
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With a dual axle trailer, should you get a flat, you can continue to your destination, without noticing the inconvenience. However, the shredding tire will destroy a good part of the trailer's wheel well and plumbing.
Consumer demand favors the dual axle, so that's what the consumer gets; twice as many tires and brakes and bearings to maintain.
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Old 05-08-2017, 10:54 PM   #28
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Tandem axle trailers are more stable on the highway. They sway less. They can carry a heavier load if needed. Since the axles are closer to the rear end and the front of the trailer, they don't drag their rear bumpers or hitches as much as you negotiate driveways and back roads.

In an emergency you can pull off one wheel and proceed. Like if you have no spare or if you get a bad wheel bearing. I recently saw one coming into a shop with a wheel off. Bearings destroyed and axle damaged. One wheel removed and towed in.

You have twice as many of a lot of parts, but the improvement in towing makes it worth it to me. You also have twice as many brakes, so mountain descents can be easier if the trailer brakes are used to help slow the TV.

Of course, if the trailer only weighs 1,500 lbs or so, and is really short, a single axle is better. By the time they get to about 20 feet, the tandem makes more sense. Easier towing, less load on the axles and tires, stability, etc.
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Old 05-08-2017, 10:57 PM   #29
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The OP also mentioned not camping below freezing. That alone would make me put a 4 season rig lower on my totem pole due to weight and $, regardless of brand........
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Old 05-09-2017, 01:20 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Dwainkitchens View Post
Is there an advantage to a double axle, or does this just depend on weight of trailer?
Dwain
It really is all in the design of any trailer to it needing a tandem or not. Like others have said, length and weight pretty much decide it. I like towing tandems better than a single axle but haven't had a problem with either. Four things about tandem axle trailers. Generally only one axle has brakes. It's always the rear tire that gets punctured as the first tire tosses up the road hazard just perfect for the rear tire to eat . Having a blowout with 2 axles keeps the trailer from bottoming out unless both go on one side. The tire that comes apart is always on the plumbing side and takes it out too .
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Old 05-09-2017, 05:15 AM   #31
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Speaking on the getting a flat benefit. Had one on the highway this winter, doing 60ish, in the rain, on a dark highway. It felt like I was driving over a metal bridge, it was buzzing and the rig was just vibrating some. A check of the mirrors showed the left rear was blown. I'm sure it took under a minute to notice the issue and pull over. No damage to the Escape other then the rim is somewhat scraped and scratched up.

Dual axle does not turn as tightly as a single.
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Old 05-09-2017, 06:11 AM   #32
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My single axle 17 foot Casita always drug the rear receiver hitch pulling out of my driveway. My dual axle 19 foot Escape is not close to dragging.
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Old 05-09-2017, 06:43 AM   #33
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There are no right or wrong answers to the query in the title. Everyone has opinions based on their own wants and needs, which will not be the same for any two people. Even those with identical trailers use them differently.

I agree completely that there is some better design elements to the Oliver. 90% of the RV industry uses the same lower quality products for finishing. Escape is always improving though with some key elements as they discover items that are more prone to poor performance, especially in critical areas.

I looked hard at the Oliver in 2008, but for me just could not get past to what me appeared to be an institutional looking interior, not warm and cozy. Even a warmer colour gelcoat would help, but they would not accommodate this. This, the layout and the cost were what took it out of the running for me.

At the time Escape announced it would be releasing a 19' model, and I got all over that and was one of the first to own one, and loved most things about it.

The one HUGE factor for me is the fact that though the Oliver is better outfitted than the Escape, there is very little you can do to remodel any of the elements. With Escape it is very easy to do this. While a stock Escape 5.0TA is ready to go and make camping memories, I recognized that for my tastes it could use some upgrading to some key elements. The main elements were just fine, I just wanted something upgraded for fit and finish, and have the capacity to improve them. Escape accomodated my requests quite well where they could, which is allowing me to eke out lots of storage space, use some top quality products, and make the trailer my own. Not much chance for rebuilding the cabinetry in an Oliver.

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Luan is Philippine mahogany plywood of three plies and about 1/8" to 1/4" thick. This is also a common building material for drawer bottoms and thin partitions. It is also called door skin. It's light, glues well, staples fairly well, accepts finish well, but is not very strong. Not good for drawer fronts or bulkheads, for instance. So it's fine for low weight and in low stress locations.
Most of this I agree with, except the fact that it is actually very strong, and the stuff that Escape uses adds strength to the cabinetry quite a bit. I have been cutting and using up a couple 4x8 sheets in my remodelling, and was surprised to find out it is fibre reinforced. I would have loved to use a different product, but the cost was quite prohibitive, and am glad it does possess the strength it does have given its light weight.
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Actually, if you were to buy an Airstream, I would not be impressed at all. Since they were sold, from everything I have heard, quality has been on a downward spiral. And I find their layouts not enticing.
In chatting with Robert Johans, the designer of the Nest Caravan, he is quite impressed with the quality they use, and their attention to detail. There may be some elements where they have not done so well, but every manufacturer has this.

But I definitely agree about the layouts, not unless you get into the larger trailers do they have ones that seem more usable.
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Originally Posted by Dwainkitchens View Post
Is there an advantage to a double axle, or does this just depend on weight of trailer?
Dwain
I have towed many different trailers of all sizes, and with these lighter trailers one of the many reasons for dual axles is definitely stability, especially as they get longer. It also helps smooth out the trailer's ride too, as bumps and dips are smoothed out with tandem wheels going over them. Heck, there is not a travel trailer out there that could not use a single axle, they make them for just about any weight rating an RV could have, it is more about how they handle and tow.
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Old 05-09-2017, 06:49 AM   #34
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The OP also mentioned not camping below freezing. That alone would make me put a 4 season rig lower on my totem pole due to weight and $, regardless of brand........
The OP actually said " FRIGID " temperatures , which to a Floridian could be anything below 70 Deg F. We were camping in Florida when the temperature dropped to 27 deg F and they were talking about closing schools ! .
My point , is the OP talking about Minnesota FRIGID or Florida
FRIGID ?
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:08 PM   #35
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I never experienced any better handling from a tandem, but I sure got waaaay more flats. The front tire seems to position nails perfectly for the rear to be stabbed.
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Old 05-10-2017, 07:28 AM   #36
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But I am sure and you will probably agree with me that there is a small handful of Oliver owners who bought them because they just had to have what they considered the "Cadillac" of trailers and think they are impressing others, just as some people will purchase stainless steel appliances and granite countertops for their home simply because SS and granite are the current "in thing." Remember avocado and yellow appliances in the 60s and 70s!
There may be one or two who buy an Oliver to impress, but I haven't met them yet. Heck, most folks don't even know what an Oliver is, how it's made or the cost. I get asked all the time what model Casita am I pulling!

We wanted a trailer that would go anywhere, anytime (within limits of course). We've' been out in temps in the 100's and also in the low 20's with snow. Our neighbor has an original 2008 Oliver with a billion or so miles on it and it still looks new inside and out. The white interior isn't for everyone and doesn't have the warmth of the wood tone cabinets and carpet walls. But, once you hang a few things it gets the right feel. It's a breeze to keep clean.

We like the Escape and Bigfoot trailers, too. Everyone has their own decision points. It's a great thing that there are a number of quality fiberglass manufacturers that give us choice. Mike
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Old 05-10-2017, 11:16 AM   #37
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Thanks everyone for your comments. Couple of more question from someone who knows nothing:
1. With the smaller unites of the Oliver or Escape, typically how often does the waste need to be dumped. Is it as easy as hooking up a hose from the unit to the waste disposal and flipping a switch? Is there a cost involved if you are already paying a fee to stay at RV Park?
2. How long can a typical shower last. If you DON'T have a hot water tank, but the machine that heats the water instantly, last longer? Do these work well? Can you keep a hose hooked up to the unit so you are not taking fom the water tank of unit?


As you see, total novice.


Thanks so much for info!
Dwain
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Old 05-10-2017, 11:58 AM   #38
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With a "full hookup" space, you can run a waste hose to a connection provided by the trailer park or campground. The sewage connection will then be continuous throughout your stay. Full hookup sites include water, electrical, sewage and sometimes cable TV connections.

The cost of the spaces normally include whatever hookups are provided. Some spaces only have water, and some have only water and electrical; it varies. Spaces with more utilities generally cost more. Yes, you can hook the water supply directly to the trailer so you don't have to operate from the water stored on-board. At least that is typical; if you buy an older trailer as many owners on this forum do, that might not be true in a few cases.

If the sewage connection is not at the site where you stay, there is usually a "dump site" on the way out of the park. (These can be located by seeing the long line of RVs waiting to dump before they leave on a Sunday morning!) They generally don't cost any additional, but it seems that sometimes they will charge you a few dollars. In Washington we also have some dump sites at some of the State's highway rest areas. I think those are free.

Some parks charge 50 cents or so for each three minutes in their showers. We do this a lot at State parks here in Oregon and Washington. My wife takes lots of quarters with her.

Is dumping the waste easy? It's not terribly hard, but it does involve some practice and care to stay clean. Disposable rubber gloves are recommended. Read up on "the stinky slinky"!

If you have a full hookup site, I expect you could shower for "a goodly while" based on the 6 gallon hot water tank. At 2.5 gallons per minute (average home shower head flow rate) you could probably easily get some 5 or 10 minutes or more. You could stretch that out by throttling the shower head. A tank-less water heater in theory would last as long as your water supply.

On the other hand, if the shower water is going into the trailer's holding tank, then you probably want to minimize how much flows into the gray tank. Our Casita has a 32 gallon gray tank that receives water from the sinks and shower, and a 16 gallon black tank to serve the toilet. These are "sort of" typical capacities; they vary between brands and models.

Even if you don't buy a Casita trailer, I highly recommend investing in a copy of the Casita Trailer A to Z Owner's Guide which you can purchase online. It has a tremendous amount of information and it is very well organized. Much of what it says will apply to your experience with any trailer.

I think it would help you in understanding what features to shop for in a trailer, and also in owning and using it once you have made a purchase. As just one example, it has a step-by-step listing of how to dump the holding tanks!

Good luck!
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Old 05-10-2017, 12:14 PM   #39
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Thank you so much for your detailed response.
Very helpful information!
Dwain
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Old 05-10-2017, 12:34 PM   #40
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With a "full hookup" space, you can run a waste hose to a connection provided by the trailer park or campground. The sewage connection will then be continuous throughout your stay.

I would be careful with this quote. Yes, the sewage connection will be continuous throughout your stay, BUT you should leave the valves closed and only dump them, black first, when they are close to full. The dump valves should not be left open throughout your stay unless you want big problems down the road.
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