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Old 04-13-2013, 02:15 PM   #61
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Trailer: 1996 Casita Freedom Deluxe 17 ft
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Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
When is the last time Scamp has done anything to update their trailer?
Steve, the Scamp factory burned in 2006, including all the molds, so everything they make is an update. I have a 1996 17 foot Casita and having looked at some newer ones, I can assure you that there have been many changes over the last 16 or 17 years. Everything from the water filler to placement of some of the cabinet doors has been refined. But there's no reason for the fiberglass manufacturers to come out with a new "model" every year, a la Chevy or Ford or Jayco. But if you want the "latest and greatest", then by all means head to your nearest sticky dealer.
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Old 04-13-2013, 02:25 PM   #62
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Each and every trailer has its advantages and disadvantages.

Wood Framed. The wood framed trailers are inexpensive and yes will rot if not taken care of - but they are remarkably easy to repair by most people and rv repair centers.

New one piece roofs that bend over the side walls go a long way to avoiding leaks in critical areas. Wood framing allows an easy entry into the rv world and the inexpensive larger sizes allow whole families to get out and enjoy North America.

If stick built trailers are such a problem, how come nobody worries about stick built houses?

Aluminum Framing. Aluminum framing is a step up and helps prevent rot in the basic structure - but costs more.

Molded Fiberglass. Molded fiberglass has the advantage that the basic structure is almost impervious to water - but water can still get in through vents, openings and windows - causing much the same damage to paneling, wood furniture and floors.

Molded fiberglass units tend to be somewhat less luxurious - that's important to some folks.

Molded fiberglass units tend to be smaller and more expensive - too small and expensive for many families. The long life expectancy is a real advantage - many of the folks here seem to be renovating older, cheaper units rather than buying new. A personal observation - while some of these renovations result in like new units (some of the work shown on this site is truly amazing), many do not achieve anything like that result.


Anyway, I think that the long and the short of it boils down to: Do your research and buy what you like and can reasonably afford. Take care of your purchase by turning trailer maintenance into part of your routine and enjoy it - it is all part of the hobby and a great topic of conversation with like minded individuals -many of which you can find right here.
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Old 04-13-2013, 02:52 PM   #63
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Great summation, GP.

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Old 04-13-2013, 03:18 PM   #64
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Yupp, to GPJ...Already decided myself that we are moving on from molded fiberglass. For vacation use our boler is a great trailer. It suited our needs in regards to our tow vehicle at the time. We are moving towards being part timer snow birds and have a much better tow vehicle now. Bigfoot and escape do not seem to have the floorplan we like at a cost we are prepared to pay. My boler can be sold at a price that will buy a bigger trailer only a few years old, not 30+ years. We want a queen size bed and a bit bigger kitchen and bathroom. Something in the range of 20-24' long max and light like 4-5000 pounds or so. Price range $10-15000. I also like the newer trailers with laminated fiberglass/foam with aluminum frames. To each their own but I will be going to the dark side eventually.
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:24 PM   #65
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If we can't talk you out of it - Jump!

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Old 04-13-2013, 03:32 PM   #66
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If we can't talk you out of it - Jump!


Meanwhile, outside Tom's window:



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Old 04-13-2013, 04:04 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by Rene View Post
Yupp, to GPJ...Already decided myself that we are moving on from molded fiberglass. For vacation use our boler is a great trailer. It suited our needs in regards to our tow vehicle at the time. We are moving towards being part timer snow birds and have a much better tow vehicle now. Bigfoot and escape do not seem to have the floorplan we like at a cost we are prepared to pay. My boler can be sold at a price that will buy a bigger trailer only a few years old, not 30+ years. We want a queen size bed and a bit bigger kitchen and bathroom. Something in the range of 20-24' long max and light like 4-5000 pounds or so. Price range $10-15000. I also like the newer trailers with laminated fiberglass/foam with aluminum frames. To each their own but I will be going to the dark side eventually.
We love ya' any how..............!!!
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Old 04-13-2013, 04:13 PM   #68
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Would a Park Model be better for snowbirding?
I saw more trailer houses in Florida than campers.
One RV park we called had a lot of trailer houses and [2] RV spots.
I sure those 2 spots stay booked up?

I went to school in Florida, but have never cared for Florida.
That's why there are different strokes.................

OOPS!............Nope!........Park Models are $$$$pricey$$$$

http://www.campingworld.com/rvsales/Park-Model/14/
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Old 04-13-2013, 04:30 PM   #69
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Park models are also not made for regular travel- they're set up to be moved occasionally, but nothing more. They don't, for example, usually have holding tanks or even interior 12v electric systems.

If one's planning to do more than just haul it from north to south and vice versa each year, I'd advise against a park model.

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Old 04-13-2013, 04:37 PM   #70
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Quote from post #68 "causing much the same damage to paneling, wood furniture and floors"
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Not totally true. You can submerge most FGRV's and still have something to build anew with. I have seen all to many sticky's with entire walls falling apart, roofs collapsed and cab-over sections drooping from water and ice damage. With fiberglass the basic shell usually survives. Take a 10 y.o. sticky to a dealer with more than minor water damage and it is "totaled". Yes, the windows, doors and roof hatches can also leak on a FGRV, but the structural damage from water leaks seen in sticky's doesn't occur.



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Old 04-13-2013, 05:14 PM   #71
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Wish John Warren were on here. He'd tell you none of them stick-built or glass are built a bit better than they need to be. But I luv my old Burro. 56"x84" rear bed is almost a queen. Glass inside and out except for a half dozen ledgers and nailers to carry shelves and catch fasteners. Easy to clean.

But all frogs got their good pints and bad. a 17' trailer and still really only handy for two people. Looks like an ice box inside; don't get the lovely, woody warmth of a bushwah kitchen in the burbs, all the can't doowidout modcons (teevee, m-wave) have to be retrofitted and then you have to watch the all up weight. Source of leaks not always easy to find because of the inner hull or liner.

Other designs, other problems. I prefer to think of sliders as small burgers. A lot of more is more is just biting off more than can be chewed and a lot of less is more is only reverse snobbery. Get what you want.

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Old 04-13-2013, 06:00 PM   #72
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....... Get what you want....... jack
Amen to that.
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Old 04-13-2013, 07:19 PM   #73
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Each and every trailer has its advantages and disadvantages....

If stick built trailers are such a problem, how come nobody worries about stick built houses?
Actually, some folks do. I am one of those who would like to have a house made of steel-reinforced concrete. Possibly a monolithic dome. With tornadoes and hurricanes, termites, and fire, it only makes sense to adopt safer, more durable building methods.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:29 PM   #74
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I think this puppy has your name on it, Mike!



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Old 04-13-2013, 10:50 PM   #75
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Cool! Could make a hobbit home LOL
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All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost.... J.R.R. Tolkien
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Old 04-14-2013, 03:19 AM   #76
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Actually, some folks do. I am one of those who would like to have a house made of steel-reinforced concrete. Possibly a monolithic dome. With tornadoes and hurricanes, termites, and fire, it only makes sense to adopt safer, more durable building methods.
So tell us what your home is made of and the premium paid for a non wood framed construction. I think it is worth it. I too favor non conventional construction methods and am willing to pay the price.. but feel that I am in the minority. I have a SIP built house but no-one I know seems willing to pay the slight premium to build same to ensure the ongoing energy savings. Right now I'm laughing at the naysayers.
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Old 04-14-2013, 04:47 AM   #77
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Quote from post #68 "causing much the same damage to paneling, wood furniture and floors"
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Not totally true. You can submerge most FGRV's and still have something to build anew with. I have seen all to many sticky's with entire walls falling apart, roofs collapsed and cab-over sections drooping from water and ice damage. With fiberglass the basic shell usually survives. Take a 10 y.o. sticky to a dealer with more than minor water damage and it is "totaled". Yes, the windows, doors and roof hatches can also leak on a FGRV, but the structural damage from water leaks seen in sticky's doesn't occur.
Maybe from one limited perspective, but the structure of most molded fiberglass RVs is pretty minimal. 3/16th of an inch of chopper gunned fiberglass is pretty much a joke in the composite world. It is a shell, but not much more, and relies on the curved shape, interior cabinets, etc. for the structural integrity to keep the walls in position, etc. That's not necessarily a problem in that a trailer can be built around it, but nothing to brag about in the scheme of things. I'm not a fan of the Lil'Snoozy (I think the design is a step backwards), but that's the only company that has actually advanced things from a manufacturing perspective in the last 30 years. Really! I hate the design (its basically a pickup camper), and think the interior finish is pretty poor (as they initially proposed LRTM- which should produce a nice smooth interior), but hate choppered gun anything a whole lot more! So begrudgingly - hats off to Lil'Snoozy! I'll tip my hat again - it takes b---s to produce a trailer by an expensive quality method while other companies (old and new) produce cheap "chopper gun queens" (a marine expression) at cut rate production costs and full retail prices. And by the way, chopper gun production costs way less, weighs more, and is much weaker than the advanced production techniques of snoozy.

Remember, dealers get from 25 to 40 (or even more) % margin so, buying direct from the factory (pretty much all eggs), you should expect and demand exemplary service. Allowing you to select the fabric and a few minor modifications is not a custom build. They are making an extra 25-40$% so should earn this premium by making you completely happy. If you are buying a 15 to 20k (more nowadays) trailer, remember they are making an extra 3.5- 6 or even 8 + K over selling through a dealer, so demand the service - they owe it to you and are making almost obscene amounts of money from you. You deserve to be treated like a king/queen - you are paying for the privilage.
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Old 04-14-2013, 05:38 AM   #78
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Hi: GPJ... I'm glad that Escape uses "Hand Laid" glass mat then. All fiberglass trailers are built along the same lines as "Unibody" cars. Not much frame required!!! The cabinets are the sub frames. The fact that Escape bolts the molds together and lets the 1/2 shells dry into one takes longer and cost more. Think expensive boat building techniques.
I'm certainly bias specially when it's my money on the line... but to each their own!!!
I've seen to many stick built trailers in the RV shop with the aluminium skin peeled open and blackened rotted 1X2's and interior paneling being replaced because of water damage.
My bro-n-laws Monster 5th., that's the same year as our 5.0, has already had some flooring replaced due to a leaking improperly installed fresh water inlet...not to mention a new tranny for his slideout. In the last few years his repairs have been equal to the cost of a 25 yr. old fiberglass trailer.
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie
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Old 04-14-2013, 06:13 AM   #79
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Wow what kind of mods is your wife wanting? I was at Scamp last fall and they sound like they will mod to customers specs. Not sure where you got your pricing but the 19' Scamp in the paperwork I got says $14495 for the Standard, $16695 for the Option Package and $20795 for the Deluxe Wood model. What mods does your wife insist on having the would raise the price to over $30000? Your only going camping, your not putting your house on wheels and taking everything you own with you.
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Old 04-14-2013, 06:18 AM   #80
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What mods does your wife insist on having the would raise the price to over $30000? Your only going camping, your not putting your house on wheels and taking everything you own with you.

I think he was referring to the base price of an Escape @ $24k and with options @$30k, not Scamp nor Casita.
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