Long Term Camping Near Ocean - Fiberglass RV
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Old 08-16-2020, 04:04 PM   #1
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Long Term Camping Near Ocean

I am considering renting an rv campsite or buying a piece of land near the ocean for a fiberglass trailer.I wonder what I should consider to help with salt water deterioration on fiberglass and rust on metal?Would any type of portable enclosure be helpful?If so what would you recommend? What length of time would a camper last in the elements without a lot of deterioration? Would you have the frame coated? What to do with brakes? Anything you can offer would be great.Thanks!
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Old 08-16-2020, 05:48 PM   #2
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Brad, all I can tell you is that my experience growing up on a barrier island in Massachusetts (Atlantic Ocean) and spending time in Daytona Beach after moving to Florida, anything steel rapidly rusts. Gas pumps along Route A1A are typically corroded. I personally would not choose to leave my trailer long term in a salt air environment, unless I were willing to perform the constant maintenance to address the corrosiveness of such an environment. I enjoy the ocean, but have no desire to live next to it again. YMMV!
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Old 08-16-2020, 07:12 PM   #3
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CPW is exactly right about salt water and salty air. Years ago I didn't know it at the time but the 10 year old '67 Chevy station wagon I bought used had spent it's entire life on the Jersey Shore. I first noticed something was wrong when on I-80 the car shifted gears by itself. I delayed the inevitable with an emergency frame welding job under neath.

But, a month or two later when I went back to him my welding guy told me there was nothing more he could do. I really loved that car.
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Old 08-17-2020, 09:53 AM   #4
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I was in the market for a 10 year old Airstream and went to see one that was reasonably priced and looked good in the pictures. I went to see it and met the owners who had it parked for 5 years near the ocean while building their dream home. Upon closer inspection I found that all the rivets looked like they might need replacing. I passed on buying not even having looked at the brakes and frame. Expect more regular maintenance if you are serious.
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Old 08-17-2020, 10:18 AM   #5
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long term camping near the ocean

We live on the north California Coast about two miles from the ocean. We have had our Casita for 10 years, we always keep it under a Costco tent. This is not full proof but it certainly helps. When parked we run a small dehumidifier inside which needs to be emptied about every two weeks. The frame needs painting upkeep every spring. We have never had a mold problem but some rust, not too bad. I would advise using slats under the mattress so the air can circulate.We can do this and it sure beats the 34 years we spent in the Upper Mojave Desert!
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Old 08-17-2020, 10:37 AM   #6
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get a couple cases of Bioshield T9 and spray away.
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Old 08-18-2020, 10:38 PM   #7
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Thanks Martha for your information.Should I do this I will try my best to remember the tips.

Bioshield T9 -sounds like something scary.Never heard of it,what a name!
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Old 08-18-2020, 10:40 PM   #8
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I also am wondering how far inland you would need to be to prevent salt water corrosion?
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Old 08-18-2020, 11:08 PM   #9
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I also am wondering how far inland you would need to be to prevent salt water corrosion?

Given that the ocean helps warm the coasts, and that salt is used on the roads when they get too cold and iced, I wouldn't worry about it.
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Old 08-19-2020, 03:55 AM   #10
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Bioshield T9 -sounds like something scary.Never heard of it,what a name!
Probably an autocorrect error. Itís Boeshield T9, not Bioshield, and it is named after the company that developed the product to protect components of aircraft, Boeing.
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Old 08-19-2020, 05:53 AM   #11
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Long Term Camping Near Ocean

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I also am wondering how far inland you would need to be to prevent salt water corrosion?
Itís not an on-off switch, and it varies according to local microclimates. In SoCal you have to go 20-40 miles inland and cross the coastal mountains to really escape the marine climate, but as little as a few miles inland is noticeably warmer and drier.

Iím with CPW- coastal communities are wonderful places to visit but challenging places to own property. We did not get to do our usual Scamping week at the ocean this summer due to COVID and weíre really missing it.

I grew up in MD, where 2/3 of the state is impacted by the ocean and the bay. Anything sitting outdoors got dirty, rusty, and/or corroded very quickly.

In the end itís only stuff, and youíre not making a long-term commitment. If you really have a hankering to be near the ocean for a year, find a place that you like and near enough to the ocean to thoroughly enjoy it. And deal with whatever happens. Frames can be repainted, hardware replaced. The one thing you canít replace is time.
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Old 08-19-2020, 08:59 AM   #12
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CPW-Happy that I would need to get a chemical suit to apply "Biosheild" .Thanks for explanation.

Glen- have you been in quarantine to long? Suggest maybe a camping trip!

Jon-My plan was to park it and leave it for several years.

I hate nasty hotels and most are nasty even the better ones.Rather than have a second home that I would only use from time to time.I was thinking that a camper would work and if I wanted to move it somewhere else a long term rv park may be the answer.I like the southern Oregon coast.Oregon gets a lot of rain.A long with the salt water I am concerned the weather would take a big toll.
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Old 08-19-2020, 10:00 AM   #13
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My bad... not sure where I got the 1 year time frame- must have crossed wires with another conversation.

For extended use in one place a permanent carport structure makes the most sense to me. Not all RV parks will allow it. You’ll still get humidity-related rust and corrosion. That’s a maintenance issue that comes with property ownership.

Alternatively, remove and store the trailer in a covered location when you’re away.

I would not leave a nice molded trailer just sitting out in the open anywhere, not only the coast. I’d buy a “throwaway” stickie instead.
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Old 08-19-2020, 10:34 AM   #14
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Probably an autocorrect error. Itís Boeshield T9, not Bioshield, and it is named after the company that developed the product to protect components of aircraft, Boeing.
No the typo was my issue, my right index finger and my left index finger do not cooperate with each other and my mind runs much faster than the 3 words a minute I type. my brain proof reads the same verbiage I thought I typed.
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Old 08-19-2020, 11:40 AM   #15
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Jon,
The idea of a throw away sticky is something that I am considering.I like the idea of having insulation of a Bigfoot because we would want to go to the coast in the winter also.We looked at buying a home and moving there last year. My younger son lost his job due to covid so he moved back to Montana and started a business with his brother.My plans to do anything this year has been effected by covid which really sucks.We are older and would like to enjoy a few more years so we are being careful and planning for the future.For now keeping our home in Montana.
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Old 08-19-2020, 11:47 AM   #16
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Keep your home in Montana. It's going to be good investment, if nothing else! Things are crazy here right now. Reminds me of the lead-up to 2008, when I'd see a 'for sale' sign go up in front of a house on my walk to work in the morning, and it would be gone on my walk home...
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Old 08-22-2020, 01:04 PM   #17
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Answers will be different depending on location.
For here in So.Calif., We have mild and warm, sometime hot climates even near the ocean. We are in coastal Ventura County at 10 mi. from the coast. It has been in the 90į's here lately, although we get a sea breeze generally. Our "blue water view" is only from our roof on a good day.

If you have a "white water View" (that is, if you can see the surf), you are within a couple miles of the ocean, and you are close enough to have significant salt moisture corrosion in a very short time. The sea breeze carries salt/moisture laden air inland several miles. Extreme coatings for protection help, but you will corrode.
"Blue water views" are from a couple miles inland to the edge of the mountains. The further from the ocean, the better it gets. At 10 miles, we have no problem. Where I grew up in Ventura, we were about 4 miles from the ocean, and everything left outside that can corrode or rust, will, over time.
As you move up the CA coast, climate changes (i.e. temperatures, prevailing winds), so the amount of moisture(salt laden, of course) in the air, and how much wind is available to carry it, varies.
Regulations in CA are such that you can just about guaranty that where you live and in what you live will have rules and restrictions.


Protection of our trailer: After we camp near the ocean, we always, always, wash the trailer, frame, and tow vehicle. It is then stored under a cover (which also gives UV protection from the sun, which is our big enemy here.)
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Old 08-22-2020, 02:32 PM   #18
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Thanks for your replys

Thanks for your replys.One thing i will do when I go to the coast next I will look at rvs and talk to rv owners.
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Old 08-22-2020, 03:55 PM   #19
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We lived in a beach town near here for 13 years. Salt air is not your friend. It ate everyone's air conditioners, attacked all metal hardware such as door knobs/locks. The steel post that supported the cluster mailboxes rotted off and the post office had to replace it.
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Old 08-22-2020, 04:27 PM   #20
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My sister lives on the southern Oregon coast, about three miles from the coast. Her partner left a truck sitting over the winter and found nothing but a big pile of mold & mildew next spring (nearly!). I think that would get you before the rust! We live up in BC on the coast and the key is keeping things spotless and having good airflow. We have a Stor-Dry running all winter, and the chemical desiccant. If it's uncovered, the exterior needs to be washed once or twice a winter, after the pollen, whenever the wind blows... ��
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