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Old 02-20-2016, 10:54 PM   #21
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We sometimes find it difficult to light the in-trailer propane stove in cold weather. The propane fire-lighter sticks often do not work in cold weather. Someone in this forum told me to keep the "used up" fire stick and use it as a fire starter! It actually works great as it is flint and steel without the propane. The propane comes from the stove top and you flick the fire starter stick and voila! you have a lit stove top!
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Old 02-21-2016, 05:31 AM   #22
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Gilda,
Do you mean Butane stick lighters, such as the Scripto AimNFlame or the similar BIC Multi purpose lighter? I keep these on hand. It sometimes helps in cold weather to put the lighter under your clothes next to your skin and warm it up for an hour or so, then try to get it to light. These child proof lighters are a persnickety lot, at any rate.

I sometimes use a standard cigarette light which I keep under my coat in cold weather. I then use a long fireplace match to light the RV stove. The first time the match is lite by striking. I then clip off the burnt part and save the stick. The next time I use the BIC to light the wooden stick, then light the stove. I then clip that burnt part off and so on until the stick is too short to use. Using the short BIC lighter to light the stove is a bit too tricky for me, although in a pinch I do it.

If you are truly talking about a propane fire lighter stick, could please let me know where you got it and the manufacturer?
Thanks
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Old 02-21-2016, 08:06 AM   #23
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The other day, when I went for a hike where cell phones do not work, (anywhere out of the main valley here) I carried a fusee just in case. They are heavier than other firestarters but will do the job. When I used to work in the woods during the winter, I'd carry one in my work vest, along with blobs of pitch from bug infested trees.

In camp? I carry those waxy sawdusty blocks to cheat with. If I'm with certain friends, they usually add some "accelerant" to the fire to get it going. Otherwise, the sawdusty blocks will work but with all fires, you have to have patience, or "accelerant". Hope I spelled that right. I don't think I did.
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Old 02-21-2016, 10:31 AM   #24
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I don't as a rule have a campfire, maybe once every month o so while on the road.

This works well: Paper tube from toilet tissue or paper towels (these cut in half or in thirds). Stuff a piece of used mechanics paper towel (these are almost like cloth they are so thick) down to one end. Fill with sawdust, to about 1/4 to 1/2" from the top. pour in about 1/4 cup or so of used motor oil, but not enough to drain out the bottom. Then close off that end with another piece of mechanics paper towel. Put 2 or 3 into a sandwich bag for safe keeping. When needed, stick under the work and light. It is very hot, will last a long time and there is no smoke. (I keep these in the bed of my truck. Never had a problem with leaking, but wife said not in the house or in the trailer, something about she has to do all the cleaning...).

I also have these on hand in the house: Tuna size can (bigger or smaller, whatever), cleaned out, corrugated cardboard cut about as wide as the can is high, long enough to fill up the can when rolled up, insert into the can. Buy a block of paraffin (usually sold where people buy their home canning supplies). Melt the paraffin (always use a double boiler. Never ever try to melt in a pan over an open flame. I see no need to explain how I found out about this) and pour into the tuna can over the rolled up cardboard. I usually put in a 100% piece of cotton string in the center, all the way to the bottom but I have found that if you just let a bit of the cardboard stick up in the center that works OK. When you want to use it just light the cotton wick. You can start a campfire, or use it as a stove. We had the Boy Scout troop make these to keep in their backpacks and day packs.
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:08 AM   #25
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Ok, so more likely it's butane! I cannot go look now as my trailer is parked 1 hour from my home.
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Old 02-21-2016, 02:25 PM   #26
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Came across this in our old camp gear. Probably bought it about 1970. Cost all of $.50 back then.
Remember using Kodak film canister salt and pepper shakers?
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Old 02-21-2016, 10:34 PM   #27
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Don't use rubbing alcohol. Get some denatured alcohol. I made my own but also have a couple of these: Ultralight Backpacking-Camping Alcohol Stove

There are a number of low tech but very good wood burning camping stoves on the market. I much prefer these to alcohol stoves. Wood burning stoves are also easy to make: See Zen Backpacking Stoves - Homemade/DIY Stove Links
and hru-hiker.com/projects/nimblewill_stove.php

But if you want to buy, these look good (on Amazon or just Google):

Outwolves (TM) camping wood burning stove
Foldable Pocket Cooker
Vargo Stainless Steel Wood Stove
Sierra Stove wood burning backpacking/camp stove with Complete Upgrade Kit
Littlbug Stove
Wood Burning Backpacking Stoves | SoloStove.com
Interesting. Just yesterday I got motivated to buy one of these little alcohol burners. I chose this one, for less than $12: Robot Check
All of these spirit burners seem to be very frugal on fuel. Users report heating a pint of water in 6 to 8 minutes with one tablespoon (15 ml) of alcohol. Some of them, like the one I picked out, have a lid that is easy to close incrementally to 'turn down' the heat for simmering, which will slow the fuel burn rate. Leftover fuel can be stored in the unit without leaking out. A quart of denatured alcohol should go a long way. It seems like a handy alternative cooking method to have around.
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Old 02-22-2016, 04:37 AM   #28
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10 or so years about about the only alcohol stove you could buy was the Trangia, which is made of brass, has been around for literally a hundred years, and made in Sweden. This "Professional New Mini Set Stove for Camping/hiking Cs-b02" is a Chinese knock off and is made of aluminium, is lighter in weight, much cheaper in cost, but looks like it should work as least as well as the Trangia. I noticed a number of other alky stoves and accessories when I followed the link above, which were unavailable when I was in the Boy Scouts with my sons. At one point I cut up a tin can to use as a stove holder and wind shield, which worked very well. So well in fact that I ran out of alcohol on time camping with the Scouts, threw in some bits of dried wood branches and cooked my food quite nicely. Eventually I stopped messing with the alky and revised my tin can stove holder and just used it. These wood and alky stoves are great fun to play around with, but I still prefer my Svea 123R above all others, including the newer (but really efficient and so cool) newer, high tech butane and propane stoves.
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Old 02-22-2016, 04:42 AM   #29
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By the way it really helps to use a windscreen around most stoves, particularly the alcohol stoves. Helps heating things faster and uses less fuel. Something like this shield work very well (Amazon): HIGHROCKŪ Lightweight Compact Folding Camp Stove Windscreen
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:56 AM   #30
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I use "Heet" in the yellow plastic bottle for fuel in alcohol burners. It's a gasoline additive sold by most auto parts stores. Works very well.

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Old 02-22-2016, 12:10 PM   #31
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RE Heet: Yellow is better than Red for use in stoves. Don't breath the fumes or get any on your skin. Go here for more info in you are interested:

Adventures In Stoving: What's the Best Alcohol for Stove Fuel?
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Old 02-22-2016, 06:47 PM   #32
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I have tried dryer lint to get some charcoal started, and didn't have much luck. Maybe it's a cotton vs polyester thing... dunno.

I seem to recall reading that one can use a 9V battery and steel wool to start a fire. But I haven't tried it.
Mike, that sounds like a transition thing. The lint needs something more to catch before moving up to a log or kindling or charcoal. So you'd start with lint, add some dry, broken twigs, and then gradually keep adding more beefy material.
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Old 02-22-2016, 07:08 PM   #33
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Hummm. An emergency communication device such as the original Spot should not require your kids to be given any info ahead of time in order to find you should you get lost.
Carol H, the kids would only need info if they wished to log into our page on the Spot site and discover where we are every 10 minutes... which is not likely!

On the model we have we can push a button to send an email update to a predetermined list of people (I'm out riding, having a great time...), or the "help me now" button which sends out the SOS and gives exact location. I don't think we can talk to the rescue center, but at least they know where we are.

My concern has always been that someone would run DH off the road and he would be unconscious and unfindable. He loves curvy mountain roads with little traffic. AND, when I used to ask him about his travel itinerary, he would point vaguely to the east or west and say, "somewhere THAT way."

Now he can buzz for help if he's conscious, or if he's not and overdue, I can see right away what his route was and narrow down significantly where he might be. Probably the rescue center can pinpoint his exact location even so.


Quote:
The little bit of bike tire tube will burn even when wet and long enough in wet weather to allow you to get other wet fire materials burning. Not the most enviornmentally friend product but when in an emergency situation it works.
Great suggestion! Thanks!
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Old 02-22-2016, 07:22 PM   #34
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Here on the WET coast we have a plant/tree that will burn when green or dripping wet, leaves and all. Vine Maple - Acer circinatum is a species of maple native to western North America, from southwest British Columbia to northern California, usually within 300 kilometres of the Pacific Ocean coast, found along the Columbia Gorge and Coastal Forest.


It will smoke, for certain, but burns HOT. So if you absolutely need something to get a fire going when it's raining, I can suggest this.
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Old 02-22-2016, 09:12 PM   #35
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Emergency food

Quite an interesting plant. If you run out of food boondocking, you can eat it too, exercising due care!

I got curious and found this, quoting:
Human consumption of the Vine Maple as food source is usually limited to emergency situations. The sap of all maples is edible, although the eastern maples have a superior taste--most of us are familiar with maple-flavored syrup. Young shoots may be eaten like asparagus either raw or steamed. However, the older leaves are poisonous to people. The inner bark of all maples may be eaten if one were to need some food to survive.
Vine Maple (Acer circinatum), Pacific northwest native tree

Nothing about using it a as a fire starter, however.
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Old 02-22-2016, 09:29 PM   #36
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Nothing about using it a as a fire starter, however.
Probably because the forestry folks don't want anyone to know. As wet as the weather is here, there would be stripped forests when people want fires
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Old 02-23-2016, 01:26 PM   #37
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We combine harbor frt. magnesium with Colman striker. Also for emergency back up have experimented the strikers used by wielders with dryer lint and very dry leaves. You can get these strikers any place that sells wielding rods this includes. Harbor Freight On you tube there is a Russian surviver Guy shows how to coat matches with nail polish,he said this makes them water proof
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Old 02-23-2016, 01:58 PM   #38
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I've found that those boxes that contain waterproof matches, are not themselves waterproof. The strike strip turns to mush, so you can't light the matches anyway.
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Old 02-23-2016, 02:17 PM   #39
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I've found that those boxes that contain waterproof matches, are not themselves waterproof. The strike strip turns to mush, so you can't light the matches anyway.
Yup pretty well have to use a rock to get them light if the box gets wet. Even then if the match wood has also gotten wet that can result in nothing more than a quick spark or the match head flying off in a direction you do not want it going.
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Old 02-23-2016, 02:36 PM   #40
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On the model we have we can push a button to send an email update to a predetermined list of people (I'm out riding, having a great time...), or the "help me now" button which sends out the SOS and gives exact location. I don't think we can talk to the rescue center, but at least they know where we are.
Good to hear sounds like you have the right emergency communications device for your usage. My feeling is everyone who plays in the back country should have such a device with them.

The only reason I went with the unit that has the 2 way communication function is due to it being used in the high mountain backcountry in winter. Often in areas that are assessable only by air I.E. dropped off by a helicopter and spend a few days on the mountain before being picked back up by helicopter or skiing out. Poor weather can result in delays in pick up or return to agreed pick up spot or if someone is hurt poor weather will play a part in delaying help in getting to your location - so having 2 way communications in those situations is big plus.

If your mainly playing in areas that are accessible by foot or snow mobile as it sounds like you are, then it probable is not a needed extra feature/expense.
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