Molded Fiberglass with no (0) holes in roof - Fiberglass RV
RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-05-2020, 09:07 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: david
Trailer: Currently Shopping
Georgia
Posts: 16
Molded Fiberglass with no (0) holes in roof

My name is Dave, I dont yet have a fiberglass rv but have had a stick Keystone outback for 10 years.


Why to Fiberglass manufacturer insist on cutting holds in that beautiful Top.


Today there are numerouse Split AC systems with a compressor <which could be mounted in place of the storage bins, and an interior fan. You could run the piping from beneth the rig.



As for the skylight fan, how about a sinple side discharge


It strikes me that with a little work, it is easily doable to have a zero hole Fiberglass roof.


For the antennas, come on, whom wants them now.




with these mods, you could make a zero maintenance roof that could last 30 years.
daveo12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2020, 09:15 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Donna D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Donna D
Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
Oregon
Posts: 25,216
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveo12345 View Post
My name is Dave, I dont yet have a fiberglass rv but have had a stick Keystone outback for 10 years.

Why to Fiberglass manufacturer insist on cutting holds in that beautiful Top.

Today there are numerouse Split AC systems with a compressor <which could be mounted in place of the storage bins, and an interior fan. You could run the piping from beneth the rig.

As for the skylight fan, how about a sinple side discharge

It strikes me that with a little work, it is easily doable to have a zero hole Fiberglass roof.

For the antennas, come on, whom wants them now.

with these mods, you could make a zero maintenance roof that could last 30 years.
Well, my 38 year old 16' Scamp has a big ole hole in the roof for the egress vent, but it's never leaked. Leaks are maintenance issues no matter where the hole is. Windows can leak and they're on the vertical sides along with assorted vents.. like for the refrigerator, water heater and furnace. Any of those can leak too.

My Escape has three vents on the roof and numerous holes for the solar, plus the refrigerator vent and gray and black water vents. I check the caulking every time I wash the trailer.

And lets not talk about leaks from rivets

So while your concern is just the roof, it's much more than that. No trailer is maintenance free. Some are just better than others.
__________________
Donna D.
Ten Forward - 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Double Yolk - 1988 16' Scamp Deluxe
Donna D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2020, 10:47 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Name: Wayne & Barbara
Trailer: Parkliner
Iowa
Posts: 1,158
Without a roof vent, warm/hot air would be trapped inside.
Roof mounted A/Cs are designed for the rugged bumps and shocks of road travel.
Wayne Collins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2020, 10:58 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
ShelbyM's Avatar
 
Name: Shelby
Trailer: Casita SD
Tennessee
Posts: 571
Welcome Dave! I don't think this is something you need to worry too much about as you shop for a trailer. They can leak anywhere if maintenance is neglected. I think I've read of as much water damage from the fridge as from the roof. My previous stick built was ruined because the marker lights on the front weren't sealed at the factory. I do agree that trailers would be much more attractive w/o the bale of hay on the top.
ShelbyM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2020, 09:59 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Name: Elliott
Trailer: Bigfoot
Everywhere
Posts: 344
While I understand the desire to reduce hull piercings, I'm actually not sure side holes are any better. Windows and lower fridge vents are pretty common sources of water ingress.

There's a lot of other issues it'd introduce (like needing to redesign vents/mounts/AC/etc, but I'd actually like to see roof protrusions to be slightly raised over the rest of the roof. Some sort of upward slope built into the shell around the hole, so it's not dependent entirely on sealant or gaskets to keep water out.
Defenestrator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2020, 04:52 AM   #6
CPW
Senior Member
 
CPW's Avatar
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: 2015 Escape 5.0TA
Florida
Posts: 1,519
Registry
I would also point out that a fiberglass roof is not maintenance free. Imagine not washing and waxing it for 30 years and try to picture it’s condition. If a maintenance free trailer is desired, it is possible. You simply do not own one and bingo...... no trailer maintenance.
CPW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2020, 07:00 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 9,704
Registry
What you describe sounds like the Lil Snoozy. No roof penetrations or through hull fasteners. Power vent fan mounted vertically on the back wall. No fancy A/C, though, just a window unit mounted in a molded enclosure on the back wall. All-electric configuration makes a good starting point for a modern lithium/solar set-up (and no fridge vents).

I agree with others, though. No such thing as a leak-free or maintenance-free RV. Best you can do is make sure there’s at least a really good reason for every hole you cut in the shell and each one is well sealed using best practices and materials. Consider shell penetrations in terms of the whole exterior, not just the roof. The more penetrations, the more maintenance.

Still, molded fiberglass is a better starting point with fewer potential leak points than a conventional framed trailer. It eliminates all those pesky panel seams. There is no structural wood in the walls, so the shell itself will not be weakened if there is a leak (though certainly other things can be damaged).

My 12-year-old Scamp developed its first leak last year. It was not the large roof vent, but one of the rear taillights.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2020, 07:25 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
Posts: 2,082
Here is an idea for the manufacturers, Mold a raised mounting for the penetrations to allow for drainage away from the opening!
I did what you suggest and installed a mini-split mostly because I did not want thet haybale on the roof and it was not reinforced for it AND SWMBO (who is tall) did not want to have more hanging down to run into.
redbarron55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2020, 12:17 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Name: david
Trailer: Currently Shopping
Georgia
Posts: 16
rv with mini split

THIS IS EXACTLY WQHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT


These guys have added split system and unplugged the roof top system


This makes a world of difference in holes.


Why wouldnt all the moulded fiberlass guys do this


Several other youtubers with same idea





daveo12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2020, 05:18 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
David B.'s Avatar
 
Name: Dave & Paula Brown
Trailer: Lil Snoozy
Arizona
Posts: 2,223
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelbyM View Post
Welcome Dave! I don't think this is something you need to worry too much about as you shop for a trailer. They can leak anywhere if maintenance is neglected. I think I've read of as much water damage from the fridge as from the roof. My previous stick built was ruined because the marker lights on the front weren't sealed at the factory. I do agree that trailers would be much more attractive w/o the bale of hay on the top.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
What you describe sounds like the Lil Snoozy. No roof penetrations or through hull fasteners. Power vent fan mounted vertically on the back wall. No fancy A/C, though, just a window unit mounted in a molded enclosure on the back wall. All-electric configuration makes a good starting point for a modern lithium/solar set-up (and no fridge vents).

I agree with others, though. No such thing as a leak-free or maintenance-free RV. Best you can do is make sure thereís at least a really good reason for every hole you cut in the shell and each one is well sealed using best practices and materials. Consider shell penetrations in terms of the whole exterior, not just the roof. The more penetrations, the more maintenance.

Still, molded fiberglass is a better starting point with fewer potential leak points than a conventional framed trailer. It eliminates all those pesky panel seams. There is no structural wood in the walls, so the shell itself will not be weakened if there is a leak (though certainly other things can be damaged).

My 12-year-old Scamp developed its first leak last year. It was not the large roof vent, but one of the rear taillights.

LilSnoozy is now Snoozy2.
David B. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2020, 06:39 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 3,342
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by redbarron55 View Post
Here is an idea for the manufacturers, Mold a raised mounting for the penetrations to allow for drainage away from the opening!
I did what you suggest and installed a mini-split mostly because I did not want thet haybale on the roof and it was not reinforced for it AND SWMBO (who is tall) did not want to have more hanging down to run into.
That is how my 1977 Trillium was built. Only roof penetration is for a vent, and the area around the vent is raised above the rest of the roof.

As far as mini splits, they have been discussed many times. To the best of my knowledge none are designed for the conditions experienced by a mobile RV (vibration). Eventually, I believe mini splits will take over the RV market, much as compressor fridges will as well.

All the molded FG manufacturers have zero incentive to put mini-splits into their units. They are sold out, months or even a year out, and such a change brings about the need to change construction methods, frames, and more.
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2020, 08:00 AM   #12
Junior Member
 
Name: david
Trailer: Currently Shopping
Georgia
Posts: 16
zero holes

So you Trillium with 1 vent hole in roof is......a 1977


And my stick built is falling apart after 10 years. hmmm


wonder why none of the stick builders have "wrapped" their product in fiberglass.



Would not be as good as a molded, but I have a swimming pool which is fiberglass coated and it is 35 years old and does not leak.


Seems like you could eliminate all seems by wrapping the entire thing in 2 layers of fiberglass, with expogy and gel coat.


Several folks have done this with home made trailers and of course many have made auto bodies.
daveo12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2020, 10:05 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
charlsara's Avatar
 
Name: Charlie
Trailer: 2014 Lil Snoozy
North Carolina
Posts: 714
Registry
You can buy a fiberglass trailer with zero holes in the roof. The Snoozy 2 has the fan and AC on the back wall. In addition being all electric it has no fridge,furnace, hot water vents. Even they could leak around the windows , door etc. I firmly believe if you have any camper long enough it will leak somewhere. Thatís the nature of the beast.
charlsara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2020, 10:07 AM   #14
Junior Member
 
Name: david
Trailer: Currently Shopping
Georgia
Posts: 16
i wish they made one in 20 ft plus. I have 2 kids and one day grandkids
daveo12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2020, 12:16 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 3,342
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveo12345 View Post
So you Trillium with 1 vent hole in roof is......a 1977


And my stick built is falling apart after 10 years. hmmm


wonder why none of the stick builders have "wrapped" their product in fiberglass.



Would not be as good as a molded, but I have a swimming pool which is fiberglass coated and it is 35 years old and does not leak.

In a way, there are stick built already with an exterior layer of fiberglass. Google RV delamination to read about the dark side of this design.
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2020, 11:08 AM   #16
Junior Member
 
Name: Steven
Trailer: Bounder 36 ft
Cobourg
Posts: 4
The only RV manufacture that I know of with air in the storage is Prevot. Some custom ones in Europe as well. Roof tops are easy to fix and maintain.
Steven r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2020, 01:25 PM   #17
Junior Member
 
Name: Jason
Trailer: shopping
North Carolina
Posts: 2
Agree with OP, for EV reasons too

I agree with the OP, camper mfrs need to rethink their use of the roof and move components to the rear of the trailer in the slipstream, not just for durability but for aerodynamics.

We tow a 19' Oliver I with a Tesla Model X and the roof and belly clutter is a big drag on an otherwise slippery form factor. We have rarely used the big roof-top AC despite multiple desert adventures (its a well-insulated 4-season trailer), and the solar panels are a big drag as well. The Oliver cuts our range by about 45% (from 300mi down to 150mi with a buffer). We still manage to explore XC and throughout the desert southwest with that constraint and gobs of patience. I'm eagerly awaiting the 500mi Cybertruck or the 180kWh Rivian, whichever comes first.

Many people don't realize how quickly we're transitioning to EVs as primary vehicles, and even though the Cybertruck and Rivian will have substantially better range the our Model X, the towing range is hugely affected by everything sticking out of the trailer, on top, sides, and bottom. Trailer mfrs need to start thinking about this factor now in order to stay relevant, AND buyers who are looking at new travel trailers should have this consideration in mind now if they expect to own their new purchase for 10-20 years. The Oliver was the best I could find at the time (the Bowlus Roadchief was $$$$$$!?!), but now companies like Snoozy2 and Safari with the AltoA2124 are rethinking how they streamline and relocate vents and heating/cooling systems, is a great step IMO.

Antennas can be out of the wind and deployable, bath vents should be situated to the rear so vents can be in the rear slipstream at the high-rear edge of the hull, and an RV-specific mini-split heat pump sounds dreamy to me because I could eliminate the propane furnace too (and eliminate all interior propane, would keep a small propane grill for outdoor smelly cooking). Ultimately, a purely electric camper with a big LFP battery, deployable solar, mini-split heat-pump, induction cooktop, and a smooth hull from front to back would be ideal. Still looking...
webschooler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2020, 02:00 PM   #18
Junior Member
 
Name: Brad
Trailer: In the market
New York
Posts: 2
No holes in roof

Dave, look for a Lil Snoozy, now called Snoozy II. Itís exactly what you are looking for. Solid fiberglass shell with no holes in the roof. Their intention is to build a leak proof, rot proof camper.

It looks good in pictures. Their sales team is responsive ( as they all are). Iíve never actually seen one in person so I canít speak to their quality.

Happy hunting, Brad
Brad A. in NY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2020, 03:23 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
ShelbyM's Avatar
 
Name: Shelby
Trailer: Casita SD
Tennessee
Posts: 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by webschooler View Post
The Oliver cuts our range by about 45% (from 300mi down to 150mi with a buffer). We still manage to explore XC and throughout the desert southwest with that constraint and gobs of patience.
Cross country @ 150 miles per day. "Patience" doesn't do that justice.
ShelbyM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2020, 05:53 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 9,704
Registry
A clean roof is not the only factor in good aerodynamics. A tapered rear end (like the Bowlus or the molded Bonaire Oxygen) also makes a big difference. The slab rear end of the Snoozy is a drag. Another factor is the undercarriage. Many travel trailers have a cluttered mess underneath.

As a rural dweller, I’m somewhat skeptical of the rush to EVs. A quick trip for work today was 325 miles round trip. Bought gas at $1.87/gallon, under five minutes to fill.

But if they lead to better aerodynamics in travel trailers, I’m in!
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
drilling holes in bigfoot roof for solar panels wallnut1234 Modifications, Alterations and Updates 84 09-30-2020 09:15 AM
Screw holes. How do I repair the old screw holes around the Window. BeckyK Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 5 07-17-2017 07:03 PM
Leak source: tiny holes in roof.... artrageous Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 16 05-19-2015 03:00 PM
Roof vent leaking but NO HOLES ! Trillium-Pettis Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 05-18-2014 11:07 AM
Removing Roof Rack and Patching Screw Holes in the Roof Roger M Modifications, Alterations and Updates 4 02-08-2012 11:40 AM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.