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Old 10-06-2017, 02:58 PM   #1
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plastic cabinents

seeing the plastic cabinents in my scamp and other manufactures I have to wonder who manufactures those?

I see the Casita s have different shapes to theirs I bet one manufacture does them all but who knows.

Those plastic molds are very expensive to make by the way I wonder if a trailer co. commits to a certain amount to keep them flowing in the new inventory scheme of things? I guess the volume is too low for the chineese to squash everyone in that realm as yet!

These f/glass trailers are interesting from one end to the other to me!!

bob
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Old 10-06-2017, 03:04 PM   #2
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The interior cabinets are molded fiberglass and produced by each manufacturer from their own proprietary molds. (Scamp, of course, acquired their initial 13' molds from Boler.)
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Old 10-07-2017, 01:23 PM   #3
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cabinnets

the tubs for sure but I am not sure about the cabinents I bet they job them out!

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Old 10-07-2017, 03:56 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by k0wtz View Post
the tubs for sure but I am not sure about the cabinents I bet they job them out!

bob
We visited the Scamp factory over the summer and can personally attest that every piece on your Scamp is created and manufactured on site at their factory. It's really pretty neat to see the molds and Scamp campers of all sizes and models in various states of manufacture!

Interesting tidbit: all of the cushion covers are made to order by one person. There are three sewing machines set up in her work space, each loaded with one color of thread. If you order green cushion covers, she sews on the green machine, etc.
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Old 10-07-2017, 08:31 PM   #5
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wowser

well I am very impressed those cabinents are very difficult to make. Was the smell of fiberglass overpowering?

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Old 10-07-2017, 08:32 PM   #6
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cabinents

I will say one cabinent I was looking in today the insides are pretty rough!

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Old 10-07-2017, 09:43 PM   #7
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How the cabinets are made. They make a prototype shape then they overlay that to create the mold.
The mold is finished to have a very smooth interior surface to the exact contours.

The the buildup process begins. First a mold release agent is sprayed into the mold. Next the gel coat layer is sprayed in. Finally a "chop gun" sprays on a mixture of resin with chopped fiberglass strands in it.

You can go to youtube and see various videos of this process, mold building
applying a layer of gel coat and also using the chop gun. Then removing the parts from the mold and the final trimming of the shape.

When you have a good manufacturing employee who has developed the muscle memory sensations required in the spray process for getting even layers of material applied with a sprayer the buildup process can go very quickly.

It is the learning curve of a newbie that makes things such things go slowly. Like any physical task that is repeated on a regular basis your mind and muscles do develop that needed coordination to do tasks efficiently with consistent quality. While you are learning how to use various tools pay attention to your body movements and what works and you can cut many hours off the learning curve with that extra bit of concentration on what moves your body needs to make. If you have a mentor teaching you don't just watch the results of what they are doing, watch how they are moving their hands, arm, torso, legs, feet etc. The focus is the same as the training a ballerina goes through, it is a whole body experience to learn manufacturing crafts such as spraying fiberglass.

Another thing to focus on is not just the words the instructor is saying but the sounds that are part of the physical process. Saws, drills, routers, hammers, etc produce the right sound when they are used correctly, sprayers also produce the right sound when they are working at the proper settings.
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Old 10-07-2017, 11:55 PM   #8
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A short bit about manufacturing then and now. Then, when Scamp trailer were first being manufactured there was this thing called Vertical intagration, meaning all custom parts were manufactured by the company that was making the finished product.
Now as of about 30 years ago, some custom parts were manufactured by other companies, mostly capital extensive processes. One that comes to mind is plastic injection parts. The equipment is pretty expensive and hard to justify if you're not making millions of parts.
Since the molds and infrastructure of Scamp was established about 40 years ago it only makes sense to continue to be vertical intagratedd. The exception is the frame which they farm out.
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Old 10-08-2017, 07:59 AM   #9
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Right. And Scamp does outsource plenty of other components as well- appliances, hardware, plumbing fixtures,...

Regarding the "vertical integration" manufacturing model... It's interesting that Relic outsources almost everything. They purchased the shell molds and several partially completed prototypes at auction, but seem to be turning all the work over to others. Totally different business model- very 21st century. From their website:
"We found an amazing fiberglass fabricator, North Star Fiberglass, to produce our one of a kind shells under the expert guidance of Jerry Starke. The talented vintage trailer restoration expert Brian Morrow of Brian’s Vintage Trailers does all our interior work and makes sure it's true to the era. Spencer Cochran at SC Autokraft is the best classic car restoration specialist in our area and takes care of our exterior paint and frames."

Happier Camper does use injection molding for the interior components, or "modules," as they call them, fabricated by an outside contractor. But they also do plenty of fiberglass fabrication in-house. I can't recall how many different molds they use to make the HC1, but it's a lot!

Three choices just in the 13' class: modular fiberglass interior cabinetry, semi-custom vintage-style wood cabinetry, injection-molded modular plastic components.

There is a fourth. Oliver and the recently closed EggCamper mold the interior "cabinets" into two very large fiberglass inner shell pieces, much like the seat in your fiberglass shower enclosure at home is molded right in. No current 13' makers are using the "double hull" approach, but vintage U-Hauls and Burros did.
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Old 10-08-2017, 08:09 AM   #10
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plastic cabinents

Jon So far all is good on my comments i too have noticed things you are listing i have a question how do they get those brown lines i don't think they are deacals they might be. very nice looking!

I don't have a b/room but a tall cabinent on the left as you come in the door. I am aggravated by the small single door at the top i am about ready to cut another door below and put a door on it with shelves up and down the cabinent. I have stuff stacked inside this thing hard to find things i am not that organized but i want to find things when i need them!

The reason i made the post on the plastic cabinents this takes some highly trained people to make these no shot at Scamp at all. In this day of factories not wanting to make their own stuff or pay for inhouse skilled labor i like it!

Scamp seems determined to do things their own way!

bob
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Old 10-08-2017, 08:13 AM   #11
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plastic molds

jon i lived in Hannibal Mo most of my young life. We had Mark Twain and Tom Sawyer boats heavy dudes up to 20f i/os a lot of them.

i never got to tour the factory but i was always fascinated by what the huge molds must have looked like and how they got that beautiful smooth white fiberglass finish on their boats. Hannibal is not known for skilled people either!

Of cource then we have the 50 to 100 foot monsters of today. Take my word for it those molds are super expensive i do know that1

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Old 10-08-2017, 04:12 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k0wtz View Post
...how do they get those brown lines i don't think they are deacals they might be...

I don't have a b/room but a tall cabinent on the left as you come in the door. I am aggravated by the small single door at the top i am about ready to cut another door below and put a door on it with shelves up and down the cabinent...

Scamp seems determined to do things their own way!
Brown stripes on cabinets are stick-on pinstripes. I think they stopped putting them on new ones recently. Mine has them.

A lower door in the closet is a very popular mod. It's at the top of my list, but I don't have the tools or safety equipment to cut fiberglass yet. Soon!

Yup, Scamp has never followed the crowd. Mostly that's a good thing...
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Old 10-08-2017, 06:12 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Right. And Scamp does outsource plenty of other components as well- appliances, hardware, plumbing fixtures,...

Regarding the "vertical integration" manufacturing model... It's interesting that Relic outsources almost everything. They purchased the shell molds and several partially completed prototypes at auction, but seem to be turning all the work over to others. Totally different business model- very 21st century. From their website:
"We found an amazing fiberglass fabricator, North Star Fiberglass, to produce our one of a kind shells under the expert guidance of Jerry Starke. The talented vintage trailer restoration expert Brian Morrow of Brianís Vintage Trailers does all our interior work and makes sure it's true to the era. Spencer Cochran at SC Autokraft is the best classic car restoration specialist in our area and takes care of our exterior paint and frames."

Happier Camper does use injection molding for the interior components, or "modules," as they call them, fabricated by an outside contractor. But they also do plenty of fiberglass fabrication in-house. I can't recall how many different molds they use to make the HC1, but it's a lot!

Three choices just in the 13' class: modular fiberglass interior cabinetry, semi-custom vintage-style wood cabinetry, injection-molded modular plastic components.

There is a fourth. Oliver and the recently closed EggCamper mold the interior "cabinets" into two very large fiberglass inner shell pieces, much like the seat in your fiberglass shower enclosure at home is molded right in. No current 13' makers are using the "double hull" approach, but vintage U-Hauls and Burros did.
The HC1 actually has the cabinets built in to the inner hull much the same as olliver, eggcamper ,and the new park liner, the movable cubes are the only part that is injection mold plastic . There are 22 different molds in the HC1
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Old 10-08-2017, 08:57 PM   #14
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Of cource then we have the 50 to 100 foot monsters of today. Take my word for it those molds are super expensive i do know that1

bob
The big sunblocker RVs are made with laminated walls, sheet fiberglass over foam cores. Not molded fiberglass.
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Old 10-08-2017, 09:00 PM   #15
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stripes and such

Yes Jon while getting things packed for our trouting trip I checked and can feel those decals.

Here is how I am cutting out the hole for my door.

1. I am drawing it out on the outside
2. drilling holes in each corner
3. getting a couple of good metal cutting blades for my jigsaw and whack
ing away.
4. I am in the process of ordering the trim for the cuts I already I have a
door from my remodel to match. lucky me!

Now this depends when my back will allow me to do this but I may entice
my neighbor to come cut it for me.

that's it

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Old 10-10-2017, 06:39 AM   #16
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...Here is how I am cutting out the hole for my door...
Just passing on several tips I have picked up on the forum:
(1) A multi-tool is the best way to cut the fiberglass*.
(2) Pre-drilling small corner holes helps prevent future stress fractures.
(3) Tape the cut line on the gelcoat to reduce chipping.

And most important,
(4) Wear protective gear!!!

*Did a bit more research and seems like there are a number of options depending on the size and shape of the hole, and jigsaw is one. Sorry to mislead...
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...ass-38392.html
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Old 10-10-2017, 06:51 AM   #17
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Just passing on several tips I have picked up on the forum:
(1) A multi-tool is the best way to cut the fiberglass.
(...
Google "multi-tool" for images and this type is almost all that comes up:

And I am pretty sure that is not what you are referring to.

For square holes in the cabinets, I had great luck using a small battery operated Dremel with the small cutting wheels in this kit. It allows for some finer control, but I don't know if it would be stout enough to cut through the shell. I would try it however, and might if I ever get to my furnace project.
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Old 10-10-2017, 07:01 AM   #18
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You're right, Gordon. I meant a powered rotary cutting tool.

I didn't think of using my Dremel- I actually have one of those. I wonder if it's sturdy enough. I burnt out the motor on one trying to do a full-sized project with what is essentially a hobbyist's tool. You have used yours on fiberglass?
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Old 10-10-2017, 07:14 AM   #19
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You're right, Gordon. I meant a powered rotary cutting tool.

I didn't think of using my Dremel- I actually have one of those. I wonder if it's sturdy enough. I burnt out the motor on one trying to do a full-sized project with what is essentially a hobbyist's tool. You have used yours on fiberglass?
Actually what I used was the Dremel 7300 pet grooming tool. It works well to grind / trim the nails on my dog (she hates clippers). Since I had it already, I used it with the cutting wheel to cut a small square hole on the sofa / front bench for Anderson Power Pole jacks. It was almost the ideal tool for that small (one inch square) hole. The cutting wheels in the separate kit are pretty thin so I am not sure if they would be good for the shell, but it would not really hurt to try and move up to something more heavy duty if needed.
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Old 10-10-2017, 07:16 AM   #20
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You're right, Gordon. I meant a powered rotary cutting tool.

I didn't think of using my Dremel- I actually have one of those. I wonder if it's sturdy enough. I burnt out the motor on one trying to do a full-sized project with what is essentially a hobbyist's tool. You have used yours on fiberglass?
Roto Zip is what I think you meant loosely?

I agree they can work well but are also pretty hard to handle if not experienced with them.

A Jigsaw with a fine tooth blade is a lot easier to control for many.
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