Renovation/Fix-Up... Easier or Harder than you thought? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV
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Old 02-18-2007, 01:22 PM   #21
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Trailer: 1978 UNIK
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Hi Shawn, You took on quite a project!! I'm looking forward to the "after" pictures. We have experience fixing up a 1978 Canadian UNIK (look under "Before and After" at our site
http://new.photos.yahoo.com/sallywag...bal.net/albums
The UNIK was made at St. Jerome, Quebec. Have you seen any up where you've gone camping? We haven't come across anyone else who has one. I'm sure your hard work has paid off and this Spring you'll get to really enjoy the fruits of your labor! Happy trails. Terry Sergison
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Old 02-18-2007, 03:05 PM   #22
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Name: Cheryl
Trailer: 1975 Boler 13 ft /Subaru Crosstrek
Oregon
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Hello and our remodel has gone good so far. We are just remodeling as we go with our goals set for 2 years complete remodel.

check us out as we go on www.photoshow.net/libbycal under renovation for the trailer.


We bought our Boler off of Ebay also. Knew ahead that they had frame troubles so had planned on building a new frame anyways. New one cost us about $1000 and paid $2800 for the trailer. When we are done we expect to have put about 5-6 thousand into it. Still far cheaper then buying new or even a used newer model all fixed up. The pride of showing off your fixes it well worth the labor involved. Hope things work out for you.

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Old 02-18-2007, 04:00 PM   #23
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Trailer: Surfside TM14 1974
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It depends on what you mean by "remodel." Most of my changes were cosmetic, although we contracted for some window repair and exterior painting. It's amazing what a good clean-up job, a fresh coat of paint, and nice colored fabric will do.

The hardest (read: most time consuming) part was the clean-up. For example, the previous owners covered the backsplash (ensolite) with at least 2 kinds of silicone, glue-gun glue, rubber cement, some unidentified black goop, wall-paper, vinyl, 2 different colors of whitish paint, and a few other things that turned the air blue when I tried to remove them. Then, because it looked like crap, they spray-painted over the whole thing with blue-chip granite paint, which started to flake off because it was put on an unprepared surface. I used every solvent known to man to get it off, and scraped to get in the grooves with a brass bristle brush (looks like a glorified toothbrush). Although it took a fair bit of time to remove, I was in a frustrating headspace at the time and the "cleaning treatment" was therapeutic. More important, the results were worth it.

Yes, it took longer, but I didn't HAVE TO do it to go camping, and had left it like it was for 2 years before tackling the deep clean-up job. The upholstry, curtains, bedspreads, pillows, etc., were done in the winter. Refinishing the cupboards took longer because after I was almost finished (after 2 weeks of sanding), I tried pickling them with bleach, which brought the traces of dark brown stain still imbedded deep into the grain to the surface, and left HORRIBLE tide marks. The whole thing had to be re-sanded - another two weeks, less 3 days spent wailing and gnashing of teeth.

Here's the before and after:

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Old 09-24-2020, 09:02 AM   #24
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Name: K Ann
Trailer: 13 Scamp 1978
Nebraska
Posts: 6
I will look into the Little Buddy heater for my Scamp. Thanks for the recommendation.
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:06 AM   #25
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Name: K Ann
Trailer: 13 Scamp 1978
Nebraska
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Great and Timely Question

Thanks for asking this question. I'm learning a lot through all of the great replies as a new owner of a fixer-upper, (others may have scrapped it), but it was getting disheartening to keep scrolling through posts about cosmetic/minor repairs. Right now its shell is precariously balanced on jacks and 4X4's in the driveway while my talented welder BIL repairs the frame. The floor has so rotted that it's not supporting the shell completely. Right now we're wondering how to safely proceed. Which forum should I start with? (It may be time to start a comedic relief forum. )
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:31 AM   #26
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Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
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due to the confines of space everything takes 3 times longer even the simplest of tasks. I don't have a garage to work in so everything your doing has to be shut down, cleaned up and restarted when you get back to it. if you have to buy parts try not to buy online shipping drives up the cost so much. I have a good old RV parts place on my way home from work which really helps out picking up RV stuff. schedule your tasks in some kind of order keep them small and manageable. working anywhere under the sink is simply a pain it the butt and as we age it gets more difficult every day.
Keep convincing yourself it a project will get done when it gets done. Don't forget its supposed to be fun.
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:38 AM   #27
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Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K Ann View Post
Thanks for asking this question. I'm learning a lot through all of the great replies as a new owner of a fixer-upper, (others may have scrapped it), but it was getting disheartening to keep scrolling through posts about cosmetic/minor repairs. Right now its shell is precariously balanced on jacks and 4X4's in the driveway while my talented welder BIL repairs the frame. The floor has so rotted that it's not supporting the shell completely. Right now we're wondering how to safely proceed. Which forum should I start with? (It may be time to start a comedic relief forum. )
UN-supported fiberglass tends to move on its own if not properly braced so when you put it back together you may be surprised if things are not square and straight. get some big ratchet straps and cinch them up to pull stuff back in place if need be. be wary around the door. don't attach the shell to the floor without checking the door fit. Sounds like you have allot of fun ahead of you.
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Old 09-24-2020, 11:00 AM   #28
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Name: K Ann
Trailer: 13 Scamp 1978
Nebraska
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Great advice. Didn't think of going to a local RV supply place until you suggested it.
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Old 09-24-2020, 04:01 PM   #29
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Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
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Unless you have restored other trailers, its safe to assume it will take longer and it will cost more than you think to repair. Sellers seldom disclose every problem, some don't know the problems. Others seem to "forget".



If you are thorough like me, there will always be surprises along the way. None of them will be positive as to time and cost. I tend to add a generous budget for such surprises. The more work you do yourself, the lower the cost in $$, but the more the cost in TIME. Its a trade off.

Also note that some trailers are marketed as camping ready but are actually fixer uppers.
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Old 09-24-2020, 11:54 PM   #30
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Name: Mike
Trailer: Escape 21 & Jeep GC 5.7 (Previous 2012 Casita FD17 & 2010 Audi Q5)
Puget Sound, WA
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K Ann , you have revived a thread from 2007. I really like the spirit of the folks like Larry & Carrie who talked about not getting hung up and camping as soon as you can.

Quote:
Buck- -don't let it overwhelm. Make it safe to tow and go!!!!
I probably would have responded more like Thrifty Bill, below. At least that's how all of my remodels and other projects go.

Quote:
its safe to assume it will take longer and it will cost more than you think to repair.
I guess the answer depends to some extent on who you are and what makes you happy.

But, the trailer can also be derelict, so you have to address that first. A sound frame is the foundation, so it sounds like you're off to a great start!
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Old 09-25-2020, 12:27 PM   #31
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Name: K Ann
Trailer: 13 Scamp 1978
Nebraska
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Thanks for the good advice. Ratchet straps are on the to-get list. Where would you suggest attaching/wrapping the straps? The shell is already wonky and the bottom of the door is distanced from the shell.
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Old 09-25-2020, 12:33 PM   #32
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Name: K Ann
Trailer: 13 Scamp 1978
Nebraska
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Hey Mike, thanks for the encouragement and for those quotes. I'll check out the 2007 posts. I'll think of your reminder to keep it fun when working on it. )
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Old 09-25-2020, 12:41 PM   #33
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Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
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around the perimeter or from window openings to the door openings. another thing if your doing fiberglass patches and needing to redo gel coat or painting you can run wood braces across the inner shell and screw right through the shell into the bracing and patch afterwords doesnt take much just depends on how much things move on you. better to have braced before you remove the floor structure but now your chasing the horse after it left the barn.
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Old 10-09-2020, 10:43 AM   #34
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Name: Frank
Trailer: 1982 Fiber Stream
Nevada
Posts: 28
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I have gutted and remodeled my Fiber Stream. It is a long time consuming project that requires lots of research to find the parts that are needed to get the finish results that you want. I agree with the people who say get your camper in shape enough so you can camp and keep fixing it up as you go. That way you can use the camper for what you bought it for and also get the nice camper you want. Good luck
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