Summertime Boondocking Help - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-31-2018, 07:48 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: John
Trailer: In the market
California
Posts: 5
Summertime Boondocking Help

I ran across this article @ doityourselfrv.com which addresses some very important issues. It gives you a good list of summer specific hints to help enjoy your summer while boondocking. Many of you probably know about these but, if not, this is a great list to follow. Summer's a'comin'!
What To Pack For Boondocking, Dry Camping In The Summer
toolman45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 12:35 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Registry
Don't need to believe it.
I boondock most the time meaning off the grid.

1. Fan I carry a 12 volt fan I've used 3 time in over 1000 nights.
2. No awning, sun shade is a Paha Que that I've put about 3 times.
3. Ice packs, HUH?
4. Outdoor grill, more stuff you don't need.
5. Bambo sheets, You're camping no sheets, just a sleeping bag per person.
6. Bottled water. Once in a while the convenience of the bottle is nice to drink and refill.
7. Drying rack. Another not needed thing to carry along. A bush or tree, or picnic table works just fine.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 07:33 AM   #3
Administrator
 
Mary F's Avatar
 
Name: Mary
Trailer: Escape 21; (formerly Casita LD 17 & 16)
Texas
Posts: 10,461
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by toolman45 View Post
I ran across this article @ doityourselfrv.com which addresses some very important issues. It gives you a good list of summer specific hints to help enjoy your summer while boondocking. Many of you probably know about these but, if not, this is a great list to follow. Summer's a'comin'!
What To Pack For Boondocking, Dry Camping In The Summer
Some good ideas for camping when it's hot outside. Thanks for the link, John.

The small, battery operated fan idea is something I'd never have considered. We have a 12v "Endless Breeze" that we can plug into our trailer's 12v sockets. It pulls a lot of air, however it does run on the house battery (same as the MaxxFan in the overhead vent). Having small fan(s) with a different power source isn't a bad idea.
__________________
Mary F Fiberglass Rules!
________________________________
FGRV Forum Custom Search
Info on Adding Photos to a Post
RV Life Network FAQ
Mary F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 10:29 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 1,136
Thanks for the link. We do all of these except the 12 v fan, but do have a small battery operated fan with rechargeable batteries. Also have a generator.

I take 2 or 3 stoves. Gas, electric (for sites w electric) and propane.

Always cook outside. only run microwave to reheat things.

Have fitted sheets and also have the RV superb with sheets inside.

Always have bottled water.

Camping is for tent people. We much prefer to glamp in our 17' Casita.

Thanks for the 12v "Endless Breeze" fan idea. Checked it out and may get one.
Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 10:38 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B 2020 Toyota Highlander XLE
British Columbia
Posts: 7,186
The process of turning bamboo into fabric involves the use of harsh chemicals and is an environmental negative.
__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 12:00 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 1,136
Got this off the web. Bamboo mfg is negative but less so than other fabrics apparently:
The process of breaking down bamboo into a fibre suitable for making fabric does use caustic soda, which is a chemical also used in food production, and in the production of organic cotton. Caustic soda (aka Sodium hydroxide) is approved by the Global Organic Textile Standards (GOTS) and the UK Soil Association. Caustic soda does not remain as a residue on clothing as it easily washes away and can be neutralised to harmless and non-toxic sodium sulphate salt. The resulting liquid is contained in a “closed-loop” solvent spinning system – meaning it is recycled at 99.5% to make more bamboo cellulose instead of being leaked into waterways. This is probably the most environmental way of making bamboo fabric, as it also saves both energy and water.

This is mainly the plant-to-yarn stage of bamboo that requires the use of softening agents. Once made into fibers ready for spinning into threads, bamboo does not require much in the way of scouring, bleaching, shaping or cleaning. In fact, at the fiber point, most chemicals and steps in the cotton process would damage the viscose anyway.

Production of cotton on the other hand, both ‘regular’ and organic, requires several steps involving energy consumption to clean, size, soften, bleach, strengthen, smooth, and do other things to prepare it for use in a product. From cleaning agents to get rid of sticks, ginning machines to remove seeds, oxidizers to bleach away yellow-ness and gas flames to smooth out surface fibers, the process is hefty and much more harsh on the planet in terms of byproduct when compared to bamboo.

There is a way to make bamboo using machines and no chemicals, but that process is so costly and so labour intensive, there is hardly anyone using that technology today. But the good news is that technology progresses, and the bamboo manufacturing process is improving, so there is hope to keep rooting for the zero-chemical approach.
Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 01:48 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1971 Trailswest Campster
Washington
Posts: 2,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rzrbrn View Post
Got this off the web. Bamboo mfg is negative but less so than other fabrics apparently:
The process of breaking down bamboo into a fibre suitable for making fabric does use caustic soda, which is a chemical also used in food production, and in the production of organic cotton. Caustic soda (aka Sodium hydroxide) is approved by the Global Organic Textile Standards (GOTS) and the UK Soil Association. Caustic soda does not remain as a residue on clothing as it easily washes away and can be neutralised to harmless and non-toxic sodium sulphate salt. The resulting liquid is contained in a “closed-loop” solvent spinning system – meaning it is recycled at 99.5% to make more bamboo cellulose instead of being leaked into waterways. This is probably the most environmental way of making bamboo fabric, as it also saves both energy and water.

This is mainly the plant-to-yarn stage of bamboo that requires the use of softening agents. Once made into fibers ready for spinning into threads, bamboo does not require much in the way of scouring, bleaching, shaping or cleaning. In fact, at the fiber point, most chemicals and steps in the cotton process would damage the viscose anyway.

Production of cotton on the other hand, both ‘regular’ and organic, requires several steps involving energy consumption to clean, size, soften, bleach, strengthen, smooth, and do other things to prepare it for use in a product. From cleaning agents to get rid of sticks, ginning machines to remove seeds, oxidizers to bleach away yellow-ness and gas flames to smooth out surface fibers, the process is hefty and much more harsh on the planet in terms of byproduct when compared to bamboo.

There is a way to make bamboo using machines and no chemicals, but that process is so costly and so labour intensive, there is hardly anyone using that technology today. But the good news is that technology progresses, and the bamboo manufacturing process is improving, so there is hope to keep rooting for the zero-chemical approach.
Silk worms
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 03:42 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Bruce H's Avatar
 
Name: Bruce
Trailer: Bigfoot 25 ft RQ
Missouri
Posts: 633
In really hot weather try to boondock next to a good swimming hole.
Bruce H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2018, 03:51 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce H View Post
In really hot weather try to boondock next to a good swimming hole.
Part of the art of boondocking is picking the right place. Summer go north and high, winter go south and low is a general rule.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2018, 06:05 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
vintageracer's Avatar
 
Name: To Infinity & Beyond!
Trailer: 1985 Uhaul VT-16 Vacationer, 1974 Hunter Compact II & 1977 Argosy 6.0 Minuet
Tennessee
Posts: 593
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
Part of the art of boondocking is picking the right place. Summer go north and high, winter go south and low is a general rule.
When do you East or West?
__________________
Mike

Remember "Drive Fast, Turn Heads, Break Hearts"!
vintageracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2018, 11:49 AM   #11
Member
 
Trailer: Casita 16 ft
Texas
Posts: 59
> When do you East or West?
Spring or Fall.

I'm in Texas, so we go to Colorado in the Summer, go around here the rest of the year.
Friz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2018, 08:43 PM   #12
Junior Member
 
Name: Barb
Trailer: Escape 19
Newfoundland
Posts: 23
Besides the environment issuee, bamboo fabric is not light - it's actually quite heavy. The coolest sheets are linen - you can sometimes find these at a reasonable price in stores that sell vintage fabrics.
Barb Hunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2018, 09:13 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
peterh's Avatar
 
Name: Peter
Trailer: 2005 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Oregon
Posts: 1,555
Registry
Yron It's good to know you haven't changed since Lynne & I first started reading FGRV almost 15 years ago.
peterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2018, 06:41 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
John Linck's Avatar
 
Name: John Michael
Trailer: Scamp 13
Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 653
I am considering this Ryobi fan (click here). I already carry the batteries for my electric drill that I use on my jacks. Its less than $45.00 on eBay. Downside its only 2 speed, not variable. Main reason for my dithering is that we seldom camp in warm weather. I have enough gadgets that are rarely used.
BATTERY OR AC: Works with the Ryobi One+ 18-volt battery system. Alternatively, plug in an extension cord to run the fan on AC power
HANG ANYWHERE: Back bracket, hanging hooks, and screw mounting holes are located below and behind this fan so you can keep it anywhere in your garage for a custom cooling experience
PIVOTING HEAD: can tilt up so you can have this blowing exactly where you need to
VARIABLE SPEED OPTIONS: Fully customize your cooling experience with a low and high setting. This is what freedom looks like
SOLD SEPARATELY: Extension cord, 18-volt battery, charger
Attached Thumbnails
Screen Shot 2018-06-07 at 7.35.55 AM.jpg  
__________________
John Michael Linck - Toymaker
Camping since 1960 - Scamp 13' Oak
Subaru Outback 4 cyl cvt
John Linck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2018, 10:57 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Name: Loyd
Trailer: Scamp
MN
Posts: 7
I would think standard cotton sheets would be fine, but for those wanting an alternative material I suggest silk. Years ago when tent camping I bought a silk sleeping bag liner. In cooler weather I used it inside the bag, where it seemed to give increased warmth, but in hot weather I would sleep only in the liner on top of the sleeping bag; was very breathable and comfortable in the hottest weather.
Lmitc210 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2018, 11:08 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lmitc210 View Post
I would think standard cotton sheets would be fine, but for those wanting an alternative material I suggest silk. Years ago when tent camping I bought a silk sleeping bag liner. In cooler weather I used it inside the bag, where it seemed to give increased warmth, but in hot weather I would sleep only in the liner on top of the sleeping bag; was very breathable and comfortable in the hottest weather.
I do the same thing only the liner I use if fleece.

If it's too hot I simply connect and go someplace cooler.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
boondocking


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ultimate Urban Boondocking JOHN PAUL EVANS General Chat 19 04-05-2012 02:49 PM
Boondocking without suffering Gina D. Modifications, Alterations and Updates 31 11-12-2006 11:53 PM
Boondocking Maine/Vermont/New Hampshire Dick Pack Camping, Campout Reports 10 11-08-2006 07:58 AM
4th Moose River, Boondocking In Northern NY Al V Rallies, Get-togethers, Molded Meets (Archive) 14 10-10-2006 07:44 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.