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Old 12-14-2018, 01:47 PM   #21
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Name: Steve
Trailer: 2018- 21FT- FORD
NW Wisconsin
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We used Michelin tires on our fleet of company trucks for a period of time
The traction in snow / mud was terrible and the tread life was no better .
We went to Tires Plus and worked out a fleet purchase price on their house brand tires . The Tires Plus tires were less expensive, had better traction in the snow and we got about 20% better tread wear .
When your buying 100 tires that is a big factor to consider
IMHO , when buying Michelin tires you are paying a lot extra just for the name
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Old 12-14-2018, 03:05 PM   #22
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It would be kinda silly to ever expect a Michelin Defender to be a true snow tire. They aren't. Or declare that they are not good tires just because other true snow tires have better traction in snow. They are rated M/S, but they are really a siped highway tire and probably best suited for rain on the highway or in a hail storm.
These days almost anything can be M/S rated. Next, we'll see drag slicks that are M/S rated! If someone wants a real M/S tire they should be looking more toward a Cooper ST Maxx for mud or Blizzak for highway snow, or even BFG T/A KO2 for a combination of winter snow and highway, for instance. But I would never recommend a BFG tire to anyone for a number of reasons, especially for a truck or while towing. Never. It's just that they could be expected to have better traction than a Defender in slippery conditions simply because of the tread pattern. But Defenders are vastly better than BFGs as far as quality goes.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:28 PM   #23
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The conditions I was driving in this week wouldn't have allowed for chains as most of the snow was shallow and melted off but the shady areas were hardened and icy. I didn't slide at all but even at 10 mph, when I would lightly apply the brake, the truck's ABS system would kick in and I hate it. It certainly was not needed at that slow speed and didn't help at all...I am going to have my mechanic check the wheel bearings, hubs and front sensors as online Frontier forum member have mentioned needing to replace these after 105k, which is exactly where I'm at. Just replaced the shocks and struts, but didn't know about these other parts. That, plus some new tires should make a difference. Thanks, Jon, for the heads up about the tires. When I lived up in Flagstaff, I had summer tires and winter tires, but here in Phoenix, it's definitely the intense heat that's the biggest issue.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:43 PM   #24
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pretty sure a 1500 pickup doesn't need load range 'E', but you can certainly run them... just be sure to use the air pressure on the TRUCK sticker *NOT* the max pressure on the tire sidewall. "E" tires often handle 80 PSI or higher, which would be suitable for a max loaded 3500 truck, and make your 1500 ride like it was on rocks.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:50 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
...., or even BFG T/A KO2 for a combination of winter snow and highway, for instance. But I would never recommend a BFG tire to anyone for a number of reasons, especially for a truck or while towing. Never. It's just that they could be expected to have better traction than a Defender in slippery conditions simply because of the tread pattern. But Defenders are vastly better than BFGs as far as quality goes.
huh. I've put 20,000 miles on a set of KO2's on my Tacoma mostly hauling our Casita, along with a full load in the truck, and they handled /great/ under all sorts of conditions, including very heavy rains, 110F hot pavement, moderate offroading, etc. Ran them up and over North Pass in Death Valley with several feet of snow on top of dirt/mud/ice, had great traction the whole way (not towing). Said KO2's with 20K miles still have well over 50% of their tread left.

I've only used Michelin Defenders on cars, and they are NOT my preferred Michelin, as they rode hard and harsh, and lasted way too long. On my mid sized cars, I prefer the Premiere A/S series, formerly MXV4 Primacy, which are fantastic rain tires as well as excellent dry tires with a smooth plush quiet ride.
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Old 12-14-2018, 10:01 PM   #26
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John,

There is a long thread about guys not wanting to have anything to do with BFGs on Ram trucks. I am not alone in my opinion of them. First, I had a set begin to separate on a car and was turned down on the warrantee for a completely bogus reason that they were on a "performance" car and there was no warrantee (after they were sold to me and installed on that car with a written warrantee that I had in my possession). It was an old 6 cylinder Mustang commuter car. Instead of trying to sue them, I threw them all away and moved on. I had two sets on my Ram that would not stay balanced. I went back over and over to get them re-balanced. Then, on the third set, I had one blow out through the sidewall, on the highway in cool weather one night. They have the weakest sidewall I have ever seen and look like I could stick my finger through it (they were Load Range E). I used to have a picture of a set wrinkling the sidewall because of the torque going through them on a pickup. All of that trouble did it for me. Enough. I used to get them cheap so I kept trying to make them work. They had good snow traction in the mountains, I think partially because they are so flexible, but they were not worth the trouble and they also got louder and louder as they wore. I switched to Toyos and ran a number of sets of them for about 300,000 miles with no trouble. My new Wrangler came with a set of BFGs from the factory and I couldn't wait to get rid of them, so I took them off and gave them away. I am not the only one who will never run another set.

I'm glad you had good service with them. Your Tacoma is much lighter than my Ram.

I have Defenders on my truck sort of by default as I needed a set unexpectedly on a cross country trip but have never run a set on a car. This is the first set of them I've had and they have been very nice. Quiet and vibration free, so I know they are very round and easy to balance. Only 14,000 miles on them, but I can't see that they have worn at all and each front tire is carrying over 2,500 lbs. They are so close to a highway tread that I don't expect them to be very good in snow, but they should be good in rain with their siping and wide grooves.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:01 PM   #27
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Every manufacturer with a full line of tires ends up with a variety of results in performance and reliability.
I had a couple of BAD performing sets of Continental tires before I ended up with the new Contitracs... WOW!


BFG G-Force KDWs are the best performance street tire I have ever driven.
BFG Radial T/A is the single most popular tire among special interest and muscle car owners and has been for 40 years. I ran them up until recently as a solid cheap compromise tire until they doubled their price and dropped their warranty.


After a problem with Michelin management over their TRX system I stopped buying Michelin for Twenty years... Then they made the Hydro-Edge It was the best crossover, small SUV and minivan tire ever! Then they quit making them!


GoodYear Has a full line of tires and a good reputation,(remember Polyglas?) Now their performance tires are shaved and over priced with mediocre quality and high prices.


Kumho has a reputation for good truck tires at low prices. but the ones I'm running right now perform miserably, but they have a good carcass.


The right spec tire for the right application will usually bring satisfaction.


OEM is a good place to start with some improvement available within reason. If you don't know what you really need you should stick with OEM tires or something close.

Tell a knowledgable tire professional what vehicle you have and what you want to use it for, before you purchase.


I think a 10 ply rated truck tire on a 1/2ton pickup would bring poor ride and handling at a higher price, with no improvement in safety or capability.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:28 PM   #28
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Trailer: Escape 21, behind an '02 F250 7.3 diesel tug
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my Tacoma has a gvwr of 5350 lbs, 3110 on the rear axle, 2755 on the front. I'm sure I've loaded the rear axle considerably higher than that on a few occasions, aided with my airbag and stiffer-than-stock shocks, but for sure I'm nowhere NEAR the load range "E" the tires are rated for, but then i run them at like 30 lbs front, 35 lbs rear, instead of the tire's rated 80 PSI.

I want some good all terrain tires for my F250 longbed diesel, which has a GVWR of 8800 lbs (6084 lb rear, 5200 lb front), and runs LT265/75R16 'E', and I had planned on using KO2's, but if there's a better choice, I'm all ears. I want a tire that's good on the highway in both dry and wet weather, and usable off road too. the current tires are some cheap chinese Sailun things it came with and I can't wait to get rid of them.
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Old 12-19-2018, 11:47 AM   #29
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When my 07 Z71 Silveado double cab needed tires I told the tire salesman I wanted a road tire but it had to also have raised white letters, the truck was bright red. He looked at what was available, I think my Z71 had 19" tires maybe that further limited what was available and came up with Contential brand tires. I could not wished for a be all around tire, I didn't take it of road.

Buying a part at the GMC dealer one day a White Sierra double cab with 20" wheels reached out and grabbed me. It has the same Continental tires I had put on the 07, it was a done deal.

Needless to say with 5 years and two trucks with the same tires I'm really pleased.
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Old 12-19-2018, 12:04 PM   #30
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I forgot the tire name, cross contact.
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...lus+Technology
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Old 12-19-2018, 12:10 PM   #31
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On those 80psi "E" tires i find 50 psi as a minimum under light load is required to keep them nearly round (minimum flex flat spot while running). DO NOT USE THE DOOR STICKER PSI on tires of a different design than the OEM model. The door sticker psi is specific to the original type tire. New tires will have their own psi rating and the tire manufacturer will have a chart for psi to loaded weight you can use to set the psi.
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Old 12-19-2018, 05:28 PM   #32
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On those 80psi "E" tires i find 50 psi as a minimum under light load is required to keep them nearly round (minimum flex flat spot while running). DO NOT USE THE DOOR STICKER PSI on tires of a different design than the OEM model. The door sticker psi is specific to the original type tire. New tires will have their own psi rating and the tire manufacturer will have a chart for psi to loaded weight you can use to set the psi.
yup, and I looked up the pressures for the max axle weight ratings of my Tacoma for the BFG KO2 LT "E" tires, and they were within a few PSI of the Toyota sticker. I do run them 5-10 PSI higher when heavily loaded.
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Old 12-20-2018, 03:54 PM   #33
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Name: Val
Trailer: 1988 Bigfoot Deluxe B19 19 ft / 2007 Nissan Frontier V6 NISMO 4x4
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For Nissan Frontier?

2007 Nissan Frontier V6 NISMO 4x4





I just made an appointment with Discount Tires to change out my Cooper Discoverer AT3 LT C-rated tires (which had a 55,000 mile warranty) for the Defender LTX M/S (which have a 50,000 mile warranty). The guy at Discount Tires said that the Michelin is a better tire. I did tell him that I tow a 4,000 lb. travel trailer several times a year.


Before the deal is done, are there any other truck tires that I should be looking at for mostly highway miles and towing the trailer? The only off-road I do is taking the trailer down a forest dirt road once in awhile, but no serious off-roading.


Thanks for any input!
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Old 12-21-2018, 04:45 AM   #34
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Certainly has been an interesting thread but might be throwing a wench in the works here. Being every ones trailers, tugs, camping areas and driving styles are different, there really isn't one "best" tire for everything. Can't say I've ever had a problem with any tire I've put on any tug or trailer in over 50 years, even with a couple off brand sets a few times. Guess you could say you place your bet and take your chances .
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Old 12-21-2018, 06:07 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Borrego Dave View Post
Certainly has been an interesting thread but might be throwing a wench in the works here. Being every ones trailers, tugs, camping areas and driving styles are different, there really isn't one "best" tire for everything. Can't say I've ever had a problem with any tire I've put on any tug or trailer in over 50 years, even with a couple off brand sets a few times. Guess you could say you place your bet and take your chances .
oh, I had some Big O house brand LT tires on my 2001 E150 that were pure crap. and I didn't much like the Michelin LTX that van came with, either.

I *really* like the BF Goodrich All/Terrain KO2's I put on my Tacoma and ran 20000 miles on, all kinds of driving, from heavy rains to long distance interstate casita/escape towing, to some pretty decent off road adventures. only place they are weak is in mud, and M/T tires are awful on the pavement.

The Sailun 'H/T' (highway terrain?) chinese tires that came on the 2002 F250 are pretty awful too, I mean, they are ok on dry pavement but what isn't? but everywhere else I wish for something better. thankfully they seem to be wearing fast, so I can justify new tires sooner rather than later.
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Old 12-21-2018, 09:00 AM   #36
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I'm with Dave - the best tire for me could be a horror story for others; definitely have to put the most weight on driving conditions.

Having said that, I'm a big BFG fan and especially of their KO and KM series. KO and now KO2s for the Tacoma which sees 60% interstate, 40% local and 10% offroad. The Wrangler runs KMs and has done so since new (2000) with 10% interstate, 60% local and 30% offroad. I've never cut a sidewall on either series and a lot of the offroad miles have been in rocks. A fair amount of beach driving as well on the NC Outer Banks. When on sand, I have to drop tire pressure to 15 psi or lower to widen the footprint and I've never popped a bead so, for me, the sidewalls seem plenty stiff. Tires are rotated at every oil change and rebalanced every 10k. The KO's have averaged 50k and the KMs 40k before replacement.

My one experience with BFG on warranty was awesome. I purchased a set of KO2's for the Tacoma last summer from a GM dealership and picked up a 12" piece of re-bar dead center in the left rear as I drove off the lot. The shop said there was nothing they would do as I didn't opt for their road hazard coverage. I called BFG and explained what had happened. The rep asked me to hand my phone to the shop mgr and told him to remount my best take-off, that a replacement would be overnighted and that BFG would cover all mounting/balancing costs. It don't get much better than that.
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Old 12-21-2018, 03:42 PM   #37
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Traction ratings

I also check the traction code on the sidewall of the tire. Living in the Pacific Northwet we drive a lot on wet roads all winter. It's a choice between longevity and traction.


A traction rating can also be found on the sidewall of all modern tires. It can be represented as AA, A, B or C. This is a rating of a tire's traction when tested for straight-line braking on a wet surface. For this rating, AA signifies the best traction performance and C indicates the worst.


I generally run A ratings as the rear of a pickup is light with a nearly empty gas tank.
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Old 12-21-2018, 07:45 PM   #38
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note there's no standards for those ratings, they are up to the manufacturer, so one brands "AA" might be another brand/model's equivalent of "B"
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