What is the best non fiberglass camper. - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-09-2019, 07:45 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Lance trailers are laminated with an aluminum frame inside the wall sandwich and a PVC roof.

That’s a bit different that a traditional “stick build” in which a skin is applied over a separate frame (wood or aluminum) with fasteners.

Every construction method has its advantages and disadvantages, including molded fiberglass.
A salesman at an RV show pointed out that the Lance roof has no arch (from side to side) to assist in shedding rain. His product (I have forgotten which one it was) had an arched roof because it had curved wooden trusses.

The laminated constructions depend on adhesives and can be subsequently susceptible to delamination. The aluminum framing can assist in whisking heat into or out of the trailer, that direction incidentally generally being in the direction which least serves your comfort.

When I'm not dreaming of a steel vintage bus, or creatures of that ilk, I tend to think of lovingly hand-laminating custom wooden framing for a trailer with aerodynamic compound curves. And, surely, such a contemplative exercise as that will give me time for the reflection necessary to choose the ideal composition for the outer shell and finish, right - ?

This is but another reason why it's such a good thing that others undertake building and selling imperfect trailers which we can own and enjoy while I continue my dreaming...
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Old 02-10-2019, 05:52 AM   #42
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Studs are not the main problem with "stick built" trailers it's the joinery. The best would be what ever has the least seams.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:36 AM   #43
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If you think the Coach House is pricey check out the Liesure units being built in Manitoba now these babies are pricey but they are small like the Coach House, the one I Like the best is the Leisure Wonder, as it has a place to store bicycles in the back compartment and much more with 3-4 layouts and for me to buy it I was looking at it in American dollars and that for me is not cheap as our dollar is worth way less than yours. That is why I went the way we did, our new little W. Trend is 24'4" long then with the carrier it is now 26' long. The best part is I got rid of the V10 and got a 3.6L engine promising me a wee bit more per mile. I don't have to tow anything behind such as a toad, 6 speed Automatic Transmission.
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Hi Peter,

I like the Coach House small Class Cs for a variety of reasons, but primarily for the one piece molded fiberglass bodies; however, I agree with you completely regarding the appeal of he Leisure Travel Vans Wonder RTB (Rear Twin Bed). Great floor plan, plus outstanding exterior storage. Decent exterior storage is typically lacking on most small Class Cs (B pluses).

Take care,

Dean
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Old 02-10-2019, 03:46 PM   #44
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Studs are not the main problem with "stick built" trailers it's the joinery. The best would be what ever has the least seams.
Anything with wood framing and a rubber roof with marginal edge sealing is out of the question for me. Wood may be fine when it's fine, but if it sits wet it turns to mush and the trailer is totaled. Plus, where the siding has to span between frame members, it is very weak, so it dents easily. Where the awning screws into wood members, the attachments get loose and will pull out with little force. This gradually allows more moisture in and then fails, which does a lot of damage. The way the manufacturers install the overhead fan, skylights and vent flashings means they will fail. They just screw all of those things down with no sealant and then pour sealer over the top of the joint. Soon, the sealant becomes UV degraded and cracked. This is the moisture path to the framing. The rubber roofs are very fragile and get holes if something is dropped or if they scrape against a tree branch. Then you have to go up and look for the problem before it ruins the trailer, if you know it happened.

Probably the best thing you can do if you buy a sticky, is to coat the entire roof with an elastomeric trailer top coating right away. Several coats. Pay attention to the edge joint trim and screws.

When looking at used ones be sure the windows have not leaked enough to damage the wall framing.
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Old 02-11-2019, 07:20 AM   #45
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: first off what size trailer are you looking for, it would be nice to know length and what you tow vehicle can handle. The fellows on here deal only with Fibre Glass Campers not non FG. so it is hard for them to pick something for you.
stude
:Our Winnebago Trend is a CLass C but is on a Class B chassis with no Basement Storage so we found place to put it all and added a wee bit more, twin beds, rear bathroom, (need to do a bit of work on the Toilet as the idiots who placed it did something wrong). It has everything we want in a smaller MH and more. What sold us on this unit is the Price new cost $150,000.00 our Price 1/2 that price then with taxes makes it about $83,000.00 all in. Want to do some winter camping but right now they are pissing around on things to do with warranty. Should have a answer in the next few days.
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Old 02-11-2019, 07:30 PM   #46
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I think they call those Class B+ ... a B is entirely inside the original van body even if it has a taller roof, while a B+ tends to be a wider behind the front doors, but is not as big/boxy as a C.
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Old 02-12-2019, 12:54 AM   #47
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...Finally, keep in mind that Thor has purchased Airstream, meaning the newest ones will be slapped together and unreliable.

Good luck!
WendyW
Thor Industries was created in 1980 when Wade F. B. Thompson and Peter Busch Orthwein acquired Airstream from Beatrice Foods. The name "Thor" combined the first two letters of each entrepreneur's name. So, based on what you’re saying, one would need to buy an Airstream that was built in 1979 or before in order to get one that’s not “slapped together and unreliable.”
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Old 02-12-2019, 03:28 PM   #48
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Steve: Yes, one would need to purchase one that old. I spent some time in the AirForums too.

I know someone with a 2019 Airstream International. Young guy who thought it would be an "investment". Problems with water leaks, gas hoses, rivets, leaks around the window and I haven't talked to him in awhile, so I have no idea what may have been added to the list. Airstream drags their feet in working with him. This is typical of Thor. Camplite has been discontinued, and the quality went down on that after Thor bought them. Even K-Z is a subsidiary of Thor, which I didn't know. On RV #10, a variety of types, I wouldn't recommend any of the newer units - plus so easy to end up "upside down" (one owes more than the unit is worth) in a unit that one isn't satisfied with and just desperately wants to unload.

I have been following the blogs of one couple with a Little Guy Max (a lot of storage space for the size) and the other has Liberty Outdoors T@B 400. Customer service seems to be good with both manufacturers.

Sadly, people have come to accept poor workmanship which continues to the drive the trend.
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:09 PM   #49
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I camped next to a couple from Canada that had an airstream. He carries a drill, rivets and rivet gun with him for maintenance! Also, the trailer seemed quite heavy to me. I do not remember the model.
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:11 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by Steve Outlaw View Post
Thor Industries was created in 1980 when Wade F. B. Thompson and Peter Busch Orthwein acquired Airstream from Beatrice Foods. The name "Thor" combined the first two letters of each entrepreneur's name. So, based on what you’re saying, one would need to buy an Airstream that was built in 1979 or before in order to get one that’s not “slapped together and unreliable.”
Airstream owner here -

Airstreams from the late 80s and into the early 90s are well built and the ones in the 23 - 25 foot range are pretty desirable as refurb projects but as they age are going to have some notable replacement needs. As with Fiberglass trailers the torsion axles have a 25 to 30 year life span - replace. Some system will also be aging, inverters, pumps, etc - again all replaceable but you should know what you are getting into.

After about 94 weight on airstreams started to creep up and interiors began to use stock stuff found in every other rv.

Airstreams built prior to 1974 have no gray tanks. If you are handy, restoring a 60's model is a great way to go. They are lightweight and spacious. Gray tanks can be added - still this is a substantial undertaking.

None of these are 4 season trailers, imo and aluminum walls get might cold.
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Old 02-13-2019, 12:01 PM   #51
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"To live in" as in full-time?
“A bit larger” than what?

What's wrong with a Bigfoot 25RQ?
You must be under 6' 3".
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Old 02-13-2019, 12:42 PM   #52
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Hi, I've had2 Casitas, 1 Bigfoot, a class A motorhome, and a couple of other RVs. By far, my favorite is the LANCE Trailer. They really know what they're doing, and they have a variety of models and sizes to suit about anyone. If I were going to get another Trailer, it would be the LANCE 1985. Check it out on the Lance site at https://www.lancecamper.com. n my opinions, NO one makes a better camper. It's 4 season, and has everything one needs for living. They are a bit pricey, but what isn't?
Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions.

Keith
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Old 02-13-2019, 01:59 PM   #53
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non fiberglass

Have you considered either the 25ft Big Foot or the 21ft Escape? IF it has to be non fiberglass I would seriously consider a Lance and definitely Not a Jayco .
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Old 02-13-2019, 04:01 PM   #54
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Taylor Coach

I vote for Taylor Coach.

Taylor Coach - Welcome

They are built one-at-a-time. Bolts and screws are used where the mass produced trailers are using staples. They are very lightweight. We bought our 17 ft new in 2008 and it has been great. “No runs, no drips, no errors!” Check out their web site.

Cheers John
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Old 02-13-2019, 07:07 PM   #55
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I vote for Taylor Coach.

Taylor Coach - Welcome

They are built one-at-a-time. Bolts and screws are used where the mass produced trailers are using staples. They are very lightweight. We bought our 17 ft new in 2008 and it has been great. “No runs, no drips, no errors!” Check out their web site.

Cheers John
Hi John,

I have watched every video produced by Brad Taylor (Taylor Coach). Yup, he makes them one at a time and will do considerable customization. I am a fan.

Happy Camping,

Dean
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Old 02-13-2019, 08:15 PM   #56
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Full time travel package

If I was going to try Full time RV living......, BUT I am another one that cannot give up on Home base and my shop and most of my "Junque" so that means that full time RV living is not an option... But I have thought about it..... For what it is worth, I thought about how I spend a lot of my time now that I am retired. We have a 21 foot 1973 Argosy that we currently use. And Not much for various reasons. I would consider first the tow vehicle. A Newer Small bus like the Airport shuttle buses, converted into a "den" Office/TV/Computer/sewing (for the Wife) room with 2 FULL Size lazy boy Chairs. I would not buy and convert a commercially used, worn out tow unit of any kind, Roadside break downs are expensive and down right dangerous. The Camper would be the Kitchen/Bedroom/Bathroom. I like the Camplite/Livin Lite, but again they like many others have been sold to Thor industries which does not seem to have a good reputation for quality. Scamp makes a 19 foot Fiberglas 5th Wheel, but that would not work with a small bus for a tow vehicle. The Scamp 5th wheel would work for me for a 2 or 3 month tour of the country, but would be small to live in. Lots of other things to consider, like Healthcare and out of Network copays and deductibles while full timing.

Best of luck on Whatever you decide to do. Bill
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Old 02-13-2019, 08:21 PM   #57
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Parked next to an Aria motorhome at Cracker Barrel tonight. It’s a beauty! At a little over $300k it’s outside my budget.

Saw a Prevost at the Tampa RV show. It really had it all. At $1,750,000 I passed....
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Old 02-14-2019, 09:06 AM   #58
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Jayco or Crossroads
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Old 02-14-2019, 10:10 AM   #59
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We have been investing Grand Design

My niece became a full timer last fall and is currently in Texas. We communicate often and said she was talking to people about their new purchase experience. At the time, she had talked to five different people about their new purchase experience. She said three of the five had terrible stories. One individual said that he had to postpone his travels for a year due to repairs to his new unit. Another that spent $80,000 on a unit said that the first time they went out and it rained, it was like being in a shower.


Although we are not at the buying point yet, I am in the investigation stage. I am not sure where I got the lead but came across a company called "Grand Design RV." Everything I know comes from their website but it is going to prompt a summer trip to a dealer that is about 200 miles from our home.



Does anyone have any input through owning a Grand Design RV? I know they make fiberglass and metal sided units.
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Old 02-16-2019, 05:27 PM   #60
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Jayco or Airstream.
I subscribe to a few different forums - this one always has complaints a about customer service
https://www.jaycoowners.com/forums/f...m_medium=email
And after hearing horror stories from a coworker about her new Jayco RV she purchased at an RV show, I am very appreciative of our little Escape.
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