How much? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-06-2013, 10:32 PM   #1
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Name: Ashley
Trailer: 1986 Uhaul CT
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How much?

I'm in the market for any (older) 13' egg. I've come to the conclusion that I'll probably have some work to do when I do find one... (leaks, sagging door, possibly battery, floors and reupholstering etc). Just trying to get an idea of about how much I should plan on spending. I'm not trying to remodel or anything really fancy, just make sure the basics are working.

If you don't mind sharing, about how much did you spend to fix yours up? $100? A few hundred? $1000? Maybe more if it was in pretty bad shape? I'm really pretty clueless about how much parts and pieces cost, so any input would help. Thanks!
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:04 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Tuanis View Post
I'm in the market for any (older) 13' egg. I've come to the conclusion that I'll probably have some work to do when I do find one... (leaks, sagging door, possibly battery, floors and reupholstering etc). Just trying to get an idea of about how much I should plan on spending. I'm not trying to remodel or anything really fancy, just make sure the basics are working.

If you don't mind sharing, about how much did you spend to fix yours up? $100? A few hundred? $1000? Maybe more if it was in pretty bad shape? I'm really pretty clueless about how much parts and pieces cost, so any input would help. Thanks!
I've seen some sell around $500 that need a lot of work. Windows would be the most difficult to replace depending on your skill level. Total I'd guess $3K with new innards (used furnace, water pump, toilet, etc.)

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Old 01-07-2013, 12:39 AM   #3
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Depends on what it needs. I looked at a older scamp 16 needed a new axle, and then I would want at least 14" rims, so add 3 tires, then breaks.... everything was almost 20 years old so fridge, heater, water heater, pumps...hoses, yeah it can add up. So I bought a like new trailer. Sometimes you can get abetter deal on something that someone has already spent to fix it up and wants a bigger one now...

Good Luck!

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Old 01-07-2013, 05:01 AM   #4
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A good place to get an idea of prices is the Scamp store. Because Scamp is still in business, many of the parts are available and relatively inexpensive. If you pick a brand that is no longer in production, prices could be much, much higher. For example, if you needed a new door for a Burro I would expect you would need to have it custom made. Good luck, Raz


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Old 01-07-2013, 11:31 AM   #5
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I bought a 86 scamp 13 last month. I bought one with very good structure and interior. in the last month I have been updating it and will have spent an extra $2000 in bringing it to my needs and making maintaince repairs. Older units that were unchanged from factory delivery are pretty bare bones so if you want luxury items you have to add them. in my case I added electric water pump and new lines, new propane furnace as there was none, AC/DC- Charger power distribution system. 3 ac wire runs and 11 DC runs, under cabinet lighting over sink and stove. new propane regulator and hoses, and (2) 30 watt solar pannels controler and wiring. a new battery, box and cables. Maintance work, replaced lots of rivets and caps and pulled and resealed 2 leaky windows and replaced DC bulbs with Led pannels.
Still have to buy some light fixtures when I find what I like, clean and repack bearings and install my new Fantastic Fan.
I do all my own work so I get alot for my money. If I had to pay someone to do the work I would buy a lot newer unit with everything already on it and verified everything is working properly.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:04 PM   #6
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I agree that, from my limited experience, anyone except a "connected" flipper is going to hear the ching-ching of $1500-2000 mount up pretty quickly and probably closer to 3 or 4K if there are major frame/axle/floor integrity issues.

My sack of invoices indicates I'm down for 2500+ and I replaced only fridge, wheels and tires (3 each), bathroom vent, window gasket beads, front dinette table, sewer system gate valve seals, toilet ball valve, couple of thruhull inlets for shore power cord and fresh water fill, new lockset.

Added FantasticFan, microwave, 1500watt inverter, "smart" converter, group 27 battery, 80watt solar panel and controller, wiring approprately sized for all above, TV swivel mount, front dinette table, two boat seats and cushions in front dinette; memory foam mattress pad, auxilliary waste water tote (15gal), Timbren "donuts" in the tug rear suspension, a long shelf full of cleaning, caulking, restorative preparations, periodic maintenance items (bearings, grease, bearing packer, bearing and race setter). I know I've omitted some small (10$+) items. Initial price of trailer was 5K. It never adds DOWN!!

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Old 01-07-2013, 12:12 PM   #7
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Trailer: 1977 Scamp 13'
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We got a 1977 13' Scamp for $2,800.
We did the following:
- Replace water tank, hoses, fill hatch and pump from Scamp store
- Remove and replace all propane parts. Tank, regulator and copper piping.
- Remove carpet and replace with vinyl flooring.
- Replace cushion fabric from Scamp.
- Remove old ceiling vent and replace with a Fantastic Fan.
- Remove almost every rivet and replace with new rivets from Scamp.
- Remove and re-seal side windows.
- Repair gravity furnace.
- 2 new tires and rims.

It'll probably need an axle someday, but it's still acceptable right now.

I don't want to add it all up, but it was COMPLETELY WORTH IT!

We've had the little thing from the source of the Mississippi all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico end of the Mississippi, and we would never have seen all those sites without it.

Basically, it's cost us a little more than 1 all-inclusive trip to Cancun, and now it's all ours!!!
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:13 PM   #8
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+1 on Deryk's thought that there are probably some decent deals on "fixer-uppers" which have already been fixed up. Some possible pitfalls there for the unwary: problems hidden rather than fixed.

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Old 01-07-2013, 12:21 PM   #9
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Jack, that is always the problem with buying anything used. My last boat did ok on the marine survey but the next day when I was hoseing it off while still on land the following day saw some water dripping out of the fiberglass encased keel. Seemed to have some cracks in it and the prior owner put on like 10 coats of bottom paint to conceal it! Thought of suing him, but spent 10k on the boat and nearly 2k to have it moved to me, then pay to move it back and lose 4k, so I spent a k or 2 grinding the keel down and refiberglassing it, after that, that part was fine... always the unknown problems.

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Old 01-07-2013, 12:26 PM   #10
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Still, if you compare to the purchase price of a new trailer, which seems to be around $20000, $5000 for the trailer, and another $5000 for repairs / upgrades. It still seems to make sense to buy an older trailer. $5000 is way more then I have paid for any of my four Trilliums. My first one would have been just fine the way I bought it, but I still put about $5000 into it.
I have no information about the quality of new Scamp, or Casita trailers, but it seems like the Older Trilliums are built better then the newer ones. But then I like Jalousie windows.
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:14 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
Still, if you compare to the purchase price of a new trailer, which seems to be around $20000, $5000 for the trailer, and another $5000 for repairs / upgrades. It still seems to make sense to buy an older trailer. $5000 is way more then I have paid for any of my four Trilliums. My first one would have been just fine the way I bought it, but I still put about $5000 into it.
I have no information about the quality of new Scamp, or Casita trailers, but it seems like the Older Trilliums are build better then the newer ones. But then I like Jalousie windows.
We spent 14k del. for the new one. Since then we've spent about $750. At least half should have been covered by "the best warranty in the industry". I agree, the old ones were built better. Raz
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:41 PM   #12
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Raz, It was you I was thinking of when I made that statement. I understand that some of the issues you had were the result of your unit being a very early model. I would hope that by now, they are better made, and they kinda have jalousie windows. But, the point I was trying to make is, if you have the time, fixing up an older moulded fibreglass unit will provide a trailer of comparable value to a new one, but with a lower cost.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:17 PM   #13
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Name: RogerDat
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I'm out about $225 to the scamp store, another $100 to hardware type stores. But then I'm not all that fussy. If it's clean or it works I'll use it as is for now. Or I clean it or fix it unless I don't need it.

Enhancements are something I'll add as I find the need or feel like spending the money. No bathroom, one outlet, two 12 volt lights (with no battery system runs off of tow) so yes pretty bare bones but all things I can address over time while still using. Other than not having a battery wired in it's pretty much the same as a new one as far as the dog and I are concerned. Better half may have a slightly different assessment but she likes it well enough as is to use it.

I learned some lessons over the years on dumping big bucks into things that don't get used enough or add enough value on resale to make the expense worthwhile.

Guess a lot depends on if your going to do trips to the local state parks for a few days or many longer trips or full time. Usage has a lot to do with how much you can spend and still get a good return on your investment.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:46 PM   #14
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Everyone has their own idea of what 'basic' means. We don't cook inside our wee home on wheels. We don't wash dishes inside either. For us it is enough to have a reasonably pleasant and comfortable place (better than a tent!), with good sleeping space.

We have a Ventura that is waiting for a new owner and use a Trillium. In both the beds are good, stove works, furnace works, adequate storage. The Trillium has plumbing that we have never used. The Ventura needs some work - but how much depends on what a person wants!
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Old 01-07-2013, 09:40 PM   #15
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Comparing the costs of buying a fixer and fixing it, to the cost of a new trailer, is like comparing apples and socket sets. Amost no matter what you do you still have a "X" year old trailer.

That vented, buying fixers to save money, unless you value your own labor at $.10 an hour, almost never works out that way.

If buying used, buy the very best you can afford.

Rebuilding & repairs will be a huge money pit if you don't know a lot about what you are doing going in..... For example, as mentioned, check out the parts prices alone to replace a sagging Scamp axle, a refrigerator, three tires and a battery. (Hint: It's well north of $2000) And, if you want Joes autobody to do a repaint for you... fergetit!


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Old 01-07-2013, 10:28 PM   #16
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Bob... absoutely has this right. But the bottom line is about YOUR expectations when it gets down to owning an all molded towable. If you're looking for a perfect trailer, expect to pay top dollar. However, if you're wanting a hard-sided tent, and want to make memories... you can pay a bunch less... but it starts with YOU!
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Old 01-07-2013, 11:14 PM   #17
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Might be a little far but not too bad.
Check this out.
Trillium 13 ft Camper (like scamp, burro, casita)
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Old 01-07-2013, 11:26 PM   #18
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I was going to build a Teardrop and after a long time of thinking about what happens when it rains or really cold, cause I wanted to go when I want too, not only on the pretty days. So I decided I needed a small fiberglass trailer..... I have been dreaming of how I was going to enjoy my trailer and been buying stuff all along and now I have my Amerigo, I want a nice trailer that meet my needs, why not have it your way? That what I am doing, customizing. From the bottom up. I will work on as I can and I have 90% of the stuff to go in it.
Money is very important. I think in the long run I will be so much cheaper than buying a new trailer.
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Old 01-07-2013, 11:39 PM   #19
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Name: Ashley
Trailer: 1986 Uhaul CT
Utah
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Gene, thanks for the link! However, I need something with bunks so that we don't out grow it too quickly.

I come from a tent-camping-only family, so as long as I have a little shelter from bad weather, possibly some heat, and a more difficult place for bears to get me while I sleep (ha ha), I'll be satisfied. It would be fun to have a functioning little kitchen area, but I've never cooked in an RV before. It's always been over the fire.. but it would be nice to have that option!

The less I have to replace the better. I plan on doing some basic redecorating inside of course though to make it my own
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:50 AM   #20
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Ashley I am with the crowd who suggests you buy the best you can afford to start with. A great deal of how much you will spend on fixing up an older trailer has to do with who owned it before you & how well they maintained it. :-) When I purchased my trailer it was 16 years old but by all accounts it was in what would be classed by most as being in really *good* condition for the price and age. No major appliances needed replacing - everything worked and it had no leak damage anywhere, very clean inside. Having said that I still had to replace the battery, rims and tires and wheel bearings, propane tank, brake pads, a rear jack as well as some of the outside fixtures such as the city water connection etc due to their age. Although no fiberglass damage it did need a fair bit of outside clean up to get the shine back - along with some cap and rivet replacements. I didnt keep track but its a safe bet I easily burned up $1000 in parts/supplies in the first year - that was before I started with the additions I wanted such as adding a Fan & solar & additional cabinets etc. ....
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