Any Tips for Towing in the Snow - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-20-2019, 10:47 AM   #21
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned an anti sway bar yet. I think that is an absolute must if there's any chance of snow.

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Old 11-20-2019, 11:01 AM   #22
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The tires I have on the TV are all season and have 13,000 miles on them.

"All-season" tires are not ALL season. For snow you need snow tires ( with M+S ) symbols or All-weather tires.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:09 AM   #23
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned an anti sway bar yet. I think that is an absolute must if there's any chance of snow.

Walt
I am curious as to why you think this, Walt. Is it something you regularly do?. I have never used anti - sway, let alone in winter. It is only needed for when sway is present, and I load so this never happens.

For the thought of a trailer wanting to pass you on slippery roads, this has never once happened to me. You do have to take care cornering in that you do not do it too fast, as that is a potential situation for trailer sideslip. That and avoid towing in treacherous conditions if at all possible.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:12 AM   #24
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Two things to learn for driving on snow and ice: with of w/o a trailer.
1 - assume you have a raw egg between your foot and the gas pedal - and you don't want to break the egg.
2 - assume you have NO brakes.

Add weight over the drive wheels of your TV - like Sand bags.
the trailer hitch weight helps that if you have rear wheel drive.
It does not help with front wheel drive. In that case, put the sand bags on the floor behind the front seats to add traction to the front wheels.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:22 AM   #25
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I've got a lightweight older clamshell and when the sloppy wet snow starts here I adjust the trailer brake controller so they only come on a bit when I push them to a panic stop. The last thing I want is my trailer wheels locking up or one side braking harder than the other.


When in doubt pull over and get out of the way.


We all have our pet/proven tactics but remember when taking advice from others regarding snow there is wet snow, dry snow, packed and powder to say the least and the traction coefficient in each of them is very different.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:30 AM   #26
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So it looks like our Thanksgiving trip might include a bit of driving in the snow. I'm fairly new to towing and am just wondering if any of you have tow in the winter can provide me with some pointers.

I have trailer brakes and a 2018 4WD Toyota Tacoma that we will be towing a 2016 Casita with.
Leave a day or 2 early if you can. Stay closer to your destination if you can. I have ever towed on snow or ice and hope I never have to. I see all the people that can't drive on it and don't want to slow them down or get hit by them. We have driven our RV in the snow and don't like that even.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:39 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by WaltP View Post
I'm surprised no one has mentioned an anti sway bar yet. I think that is an absolute must if there's any chance of snow.

Walt
I always use the anti-sway bar.

Quote:
Leave a day or 2 early if you can. Stay closer to your destination if you can.
If this was a possibility I would definitely do it. We have a pretty tight schedule, which is the only reason I am even considering towing during a possible storm. As I previously mentioned I would love to have the comfort of the trailer, especially considering I broke my back earlier this year, but if need be we will just take the truck alone and set up a tent.
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Old 11-20-2019, 12:30 PM   #28
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned an anti sway bar yet. I think that is an absolute must if there's any chance of snow.

Walt
E-Trailer quotes Curt...


The instructions included with the Curt Friction Style Sway Control System, part # 17200 state that when you are towing in wet, icy, gravel, or snow-covered roads, the sway control MUST be removed. I am only passing on the information included with the products we offer.

The reason is that the sway control can make the system too stiff when you face road conditions like those mentioned, and if traction was lost for the trailer it would push the towing vehicle and be very dangerous. It may be an inconvenience to disconnect the sway control when driving on wet roads, but this is what the manufacturer states in the warning section of the instructions.


They are only passing on the information, and so I am. I have no further comment except that friction sway control devices loose friction when wet.
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Old 11-20-2019, 12:33 PM   #29
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While I would trust Paul to tow in the snow (or drive, for that matter), I would not do it myself; he grew up in the boondocks on a hill and the hill got snowed-in every year, but Paul was brave and made snow-time grocery runs for everyone on the hill from the time he got his license at 16. The one time I drove in the snow I ended up walking away from a bad skid into a ditch.

Experience makes a lot of difference. Tires do, too.

It can feel almost like a failure to let a campground to and cancel a trip, but sometimes being too brave isn't best. It's always your call.

As others have said, and I'll echo; make sure your TV has the right tires, drive far slower than you might think, watch out for other cars, give yourself plenty of extra time. Take spare blankets in the TV, and a good emergency kit in case you slide into a situation where you're stuck for an hour or more. Some water, food, something to do (reading, crosswords, etc.)

Best of luck to you however you decide.
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Old 11-20-2019, 12:36 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Jann Todd View Post
Leave a day or 2 early if you can. Stay closer to your destination if you can. I have ever towed on snow or ice and hope I never have to. I see all the people that can't drive on it and don't want to slow them down or get hit by them. We have driven our RV in the snow and don't like that even.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gordon2 View Post
E-Trailer quotes Curt...


The instructions included with the Curt Friction Style Sway Control System, part # 17200 state that when you are towing in wet, icy, gravel, or snow-covered roads, the sway control MUST be removed. I am only passing on the information included with the products we offer.

The reason is that the sway control can make the system too stiff when you face road conditions like those mentioned, and if traction was lost for the trailer it would push the towing vehicle and be very dangerous. It may be an inconvenience to disconnect the sway control when driving on wet roads, but this is what the manufacturer states in the warning section of the instructions.


They are only passing on the information, and so I am. I have no further comment except that friction sway control devices loose friction when wet.
Well that is good to know. I was under the impression that the anti-sway bar should only be removed when backing the trailer. If the roads are clear enough I will leave it on because I do like the functionality of it, especially on the interstates.
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Old 11-20-2019, 12:41 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Kai in Seattle View Post
While I would trust Paul to tow in the snow (or drive, for that matter), I would not do it myself; he grew up in the boondocks on a hill and the hill got snowed-in every year, but Paul was brave and made snow-time grocery runs for everyone on the hill from the time he got his license at 16. The one time I drove in the snow I ended up walking away from a bad skid into a ditch.

Experience makes a lot of difference. Tires do, too.

It can feel almost like a failure to let a campground to and cancel a trip, but sometimes being too brave isn't best. It's always your call.

As others have said, and I'll echo; make sure your TV has the right tires, drive far slower than you might think, watch out for other cars, give yourself plenty of extra time. Take spare blankets in the TV, and a good emergency kit in case you slide into a situation where you're stuck for an hour or more. Some water, food, something to do (reading, crosswords, etc.)

Best of luck to you however you decide.
Thanks for the advice. We are those people that pack enough with us we could survive being stranded for several days in pretty much in weather conditions. I am currently getting some quotes on getting some winter tires put on cheap steel rims.

One of my main concerns with this storm is it looks like it might be the first snow of the year. It always seems like there are a huge number of crashes and slide offs during that firs storm. It seems everyone forgot how to drive on the snow over the summer and fall and have to relearn during that first big storm. I always worry about my wife during these storms because she has a 100 mile round trip commute, and even though she is a very careful and conscientious driver not everyone around her is.
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Old 11-20-2019, 01:05 PM   #32
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I so hear you. It's often far more the other drivers that are the issue than your own handling of your car/rig.

Always glad to hear when people have enough emergency supplies! Better to carry them and not use them, than need them and not have them.

Paul used to go out to the car when he was at work, on breaks and lunch, and eat the emergency rations as snacks; once an entire jar of peanut butter.
He said once he opened the peanut butter jar, he felt obligated to eat it before it went bad. I had to admit, he made a point. I don't know how good a point, but a point.

Now we carry individually-wrapped food bars and smaller, dryer things.

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Old 11-20-2019, 01:18 PM   #33
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I so hear you. It's often far more the other drivers that are the issue than your own handling of your car/rig.

Always glad to hear when people have enough emergency supplies! Better to carry them and not use them, than need them and not have them.

Paul used to go out to the car when he was at work, on breaks and lunch, and eat the emergency rations as snacks; once an entire jar of peanut butter.
He said once he opened the peanut butter jar, he felt obligated to eat it before it went bad. I had to admit, he made a point. I don't know how good a point, but a point.

Now we carry individually-wrapped food bars and smaller, dryer things.

BEST
"K"
If we are going anywhere more than just running errands we almost always have a cooler filled with food and water. I have summer and winter kits that I switch out of each of our vehicles to match the season. We had a timing belt break in Arizona in the middle of summer a couple of years ago. We had the police and the incident management people stop and check on us. We told them we were good. We had a tarp awning set up off the car to keep us shady had plenty of food and cool water while we waited for road side assistance.
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Old 11-20-2019, 01:24 PM   #34
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Shaun: my hat's off to you! We should be so well-equipped! Kudos! Great story!

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Old 11-20-2019, 02:59 PM   #35
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No matter how prepared you are for driving in snowy conditions, or how experienced you are doing so, you are at the mercy of other drivers. Tractor Trailer drivers especially. A few years back we were headed home to the northern Adirondacks in mid April,towing our Casita, just 60 miles to go. Squall came through and the 2 lane interstate (I87) became a one lane. I was doing ok at 35-40 mph, but the big boy drivers heading to Quebec would have none of that and were on my butt the whole time. TT's weigh a lot and do better then most in the snow, and they're on a schedule. Have you noticed news reports of vehicles off the road in the snow often involve TT's. They tailgate you and then can't stop quickly if they have to. Better to let them have the road and stay off it. Even if there are 2 lanes, when they pass you you're in a whiteout. Just not worth the stress.
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Old 11-20-2019, 03:04 PM   #36
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I have driven in northern winter conditions my entire life and am quite comfortable driving in snowy and icy conditions. I have towed trailers in northern winter conditions as well. However, if given a choice I will park my trailers in winter and wait until weather is more favorable and road conditions are good before towing them.
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Old 11-20-2019, 03:29 PM   #37
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I have driven in northern winter conditions my entire life and am quite comfortable driving in snowy and icy conditions. I have towed trailers in northern winter conditions as well. However, if given a choice I will park my trailers in winter and wait until weather is more favorable and road conditions are good before towing them.
The past 3 years we have spent Thanksgiving in hotels in Moab. Last year we wanted to explore the needles but with the distance from Moab it makes it so you don't have a lot of time to explore. We decided this year to book a campsite and take the casita. The last three years we have never even had a snowflake, but of course when I plan to tow the weather looks like it won't cooperate.

I think we may just go back to hotels and restaurants for Thanksgiving in the future and limit ourselves to areas closer to Moab.

Also the comment about tractor trailers I totally agree with. We visit family around Christmas time in Idaho, which is about 300 miles north. There have been a couple of years where the majority of the traffic will be in a single lane going between 25-35 mph and a TT will come barreling past everyone in the other lane going around 60 mph. It makes it so you can't see for several seconds and you just hope no one slams on the brakes.

If our schedule was more flexible we would definitely try to plan around bad weather, but unfortunately with work and school schedules we are very limited on when we can travel.

I'm still waiting for the Star Trek transporters to become a reality.
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Old 11-21-2019, 07:09 AM   #38
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If it is actively snowing, I worry about visibility first. Seeing other vehicles and being seen. Slow down, keep a bigger spacing between the vehicle in front of you.

Early in the day I worry about ICE. Ice = forget it. When it’s not snowing, roads will tend to clear off particularly major roads. And watch for bridges freezing and ice. Start late, end early.

I used to tow down to Florida from NE PA. I’d return in early March. Every time I had to stop on my street, pull out the snow blower and clear the long driveway. I would be lulled by seeing no snow all the way to north of Harrisburg. But then I would pull a grade and up top it was still winter. I don’t miss it!

Be flexible, watch the forecast. Stay put on big storm days. Don’t plan on sticking to a strict schedule.
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Old 11-21-2019, 07:44 AM   #39
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No matter how prepared you are for driving in snowy conditions, or how experienced you are doing so, you are at the mercy of other drivers. Tractor Trailer drivers especially. A few years back we were headed home to the northern Adirondacks in mid April,towing our Casita, just 60 miles to go. Squall came through and the 2 lane interstate (I87) became a one lane. I was doing ok at 35-40 mph, but the big boy drivers heading to Quebec would have none of that and were on my butt the whole time. TT's weigh a lot and do better then most in the snow, and they're on a schedule. Have you noticed news reports of vehicles off the road in the snow often involve TT's. They tailgate you and then can't stop quickly if they have to. Better to let them have the road and stay off it. Even if there are 2 lanes, when they pass you you're in a whiteout. Just not worth the stress.
I have had very little trouble with big rigs when towing in any condition, dry, wet, or icy. They tend to keep near the speed limit, though do slow some when conditions are poor. I know, I've done it when I drove them myself. The only thing I don't like, and it is not their fault, is the huge amount of billowing snow their unit brings up, and I either look to pass or just pull back a ways.

A frustrating thing for any driver is when someone is driving excessively slow (and I don't mean slowing to the speed limit or a bit lower when conditions warrant it). If someone is not comfortable with conditions, my thoughts are that it is better to wait it out rather than slow traffic down, especially those trying to make a living driving.
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Old 11-21-2019, 10:17 AM   #40
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I had a semi tail me from Cache Creek to Kamloops in a blizzard. I'm in a Neon a few feet above the pavement and he's up in a truck cab. His headlights were burrowing a hole in the back of my head.

Couldn't see a thing in the driving snow. I'd have pulled off the road, if I knew where the edge of the pavement was. I couldn't see the ditch, couldn't see where my lane was, got occasional glimpses of the centre line.

Ya, I was driving slow.
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