Butcher block counter - Fiberglass RV
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Old 05-11-2020, 08:26 PM   #1
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Name: B-Boler
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Butcher block counter

Has anyone put a butcher block counter in their camper? We have a 13' boler, and are considering doing so. Would love to see photos! And if anyone has advice on affixing it to the fibreglass, we would appreciate the help. Thank you!
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Old 05-11-2020, 08:31 PM   #2
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Has anyone put a butcher block counter in their camper? We have a 13' boler, and are considering doing so. Would love to see photos! And if anyone has advice on affixing it to the fibreglass, we would appreciate the help. Thank you!

Most would be trying to keep weight down, and butcher block wouldn't be a candidate.
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Old 05-11-2020, 08:40 PM   #3
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I built basically a butcher block sink/counter cover. Covers everything except the stove area.

Local supply house sells butcher block pieces really cheap.

Mine is sitting loose, I have cleats on the underside for the sink, so you can pull it out to use the sink.

I used the same material to make a flip up side table beside the cook top.
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:15 AM   #4
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I think it depends on whether you want to remove the sink & stove or just go over them? I used to deal with a local supplier in the GTA but not sure if I can still locate them. You may have to buy a 4' X 8' sheet if you only want the arbourite. and it is a little difficult to handle and transport. You should be able to glue it on with industrial adhesive. The seller should be able to suggest the best product.
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:19 AM   #5
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I installed a "butcher Block" counter, but it was actually the wide boards glued together to form a solid top from pieces from Lowe's:

Metrie (Common: 1-in x 24-in x 2-ft; Actual: 1-in x 23.25-in x 1.98-ft) Edge-Glued Round Spruce Pine Fir Board
Item #228499Model #24-RND
Stain-grade-spruce/pine-rounds for woodworking projects where a knotty- and solid-wood-panel is desired

Versatile round-panels can be used for a wide variety of household woodworking projects and crafts

Kiln-dried and edge-glued for stability


You can stain these and cut to size. I epoxy resin finished mine to give a more durable finish. I found that hardware to mount a sink is not made for a 1" thick counter top and makes things harder.
In my case I marked the wall with the width of the counter and drilled holes for screws using those marks for a guide and installed the counter along the back side with the screws, countersunk and sealed from the outside to stabilize the entire cabinet.
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The last is a picture of the between beds pop up table and night stand that uses the same boards.
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:33 AM   #6
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If your looking just for a surface to prepare food on, consider a polypropylene board made for the purpose. Unlike wood surface it is easier to clean and remove harmful bacteria that could collect on the board surface.

I ordered a 1/2 in thick board to fit my sink area and modified it to stay in place even when traveling. When its not needed I can stand it on edge along side the burner with a clamp to hold it in place to prevent falling. I also made a second on to cover the 2 burner stove when extra area is needed. It is also can be stored along side the sink cover when not needed. Sure beats that bulky and heavy cover Scamp sold me to cover the burner.
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:46 AM   #7
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If your looking just for a surface to prepare food on, consider a polypropylene board made for the purpose. Unlike wood surface it is easier to clean and remove harmful bacteria that could collect on the board surface.
FWIW, it's been shown with lab tests that, surprisingly, wooden cutting boards are actually easier to clean and are more sanitary than the plastic cutting boards are, as far as harboring germs and bacteria. Just sayin'.

That said, I like my custom cut, (by me,) inset bamboo cutting board that covers my new low profile two burner stove. Provides a nice large work area and is easy to clean.

And BTW redbarron55, that is a really nice counter top installation you have there, but I would really hate to have to use something that looks that good to actually cut on and mess it up.
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:58 AM   #8
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Hey Greg,


I guess its true. I checked it out. I stand corrected. It also looks as certain woods are better than others, depending on the hardness.



Jack
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Old 05-12-2020, 10:07 AM   #9
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After I retired, (for the third and final time,) I always enjoyed cooking, and so I went through 3 semesters of Culinary Arts at our local Community College. I too, had always thought for many years that the plastic cutting boards were the cat's pajamas, but it was a real "eye opener" to find out otherwise during my schooling late in life.
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Old 05-12-2020, 10:38 AM   #10
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The "Butcher Block" counter top has been in service for over 6 years and for fairly long periods of time while traveling etc and had held up pretty well. There are some scratches that could be buffed out if we cared enough. We use a cutting board and not the counter top for slicing and dicing anyway.
We liked the look so much that when we redid the kitchen in our retirement home we put in butcher block from Lumber Liquidators. The new counter tops are cherry and give the kitchen a nice warm feel.

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Apologies for the messy kitchen as SWMBO was busy preparing lunch and I had to sneak the picture.
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Old 05-12-2020, 11:22 AM   #11
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Thanks all! We had to remove the old cooktop and have since found a new one, but the cutout is different so we need a full top rather then just appliance covers, otherwise that option would be great!
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Old 05-12-2020, 02:58 PM   #12
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Nothing about FGRVing seems to come easily based on the different threads on this site and based on the gusto with which most launch into their projects and solutions, might I suggest a lightweight butcher block solution.

Since butcher block counters are made of composites of hardwoods. Cut a sheet of 1/2” ply to the size of your counter minus 3/4” along the front and at each end. Cut out the cutouts for stove and sink. Take hardwood strips and cut them to 1/2” strips, lay them out on the plywood to fill in the surface around the cutouts. Cut 1” strips to cover the front of the butcher block and use 3/4 deep end cuts from the top strips to drop the ends down. Once you are happy with the arrangement, use either fibreglass epoxy or a good food-safe adhesive bond the strips to the plywood and to each other. Clamp the strips with bar clamps from the bottom and lay wax paper/poly sheeting on the top of the butcher block and sandwich it with a sheet of ply weighted down with sandbags to ensure a good bond and a flat surface. Once dry, flip over and trim the butcher block strips to the edge of the cutouts. Sand the ends and the top of the butcher block. Voila, a butcher block that will weigh a slight bit more than the original counter top.
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:24 PM   #13
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Thanks for this! This sounds like it might be a little advanced for us, but we are not in a hurry so will explore this further.
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Old 05-13-2020, 02:38 AM   #14
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I know this is not butcherblock, but it is a very functional, durable, clean, waterproof and lightweight way to enhance a fiberglass countertop. This will last a lifetime with no real maintenance and can be used to directly cut on. It should stand up to hard use better than any other surface. Also, when fitting under sink and stove flanges, no alteration of the plumbing is needed.
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Old 05-13-2020, 07:34 AM   #15
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I know this is not butcherblock, but it is a very functional, durable, clean, waterproof and lightweight way to enhance a fiberglass countertop. This will last a lifetime with no real maintenance and can be used to directly cut on. It should stand up to hard use better than any other surface. Also, when fitting under sink and stove flanges, no alteration of the plumbing is needed.


What is that some kind of metal( stainless steel?)
Very nice looking
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Old 05-13-2020, 10:51 AM   #16
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Yes. It's a piece of 16, or 18 gauge 304 stainless that I took to a sheet metal shop and had sheared to size and bent. It has a 6" backsplash and a 2 1/2" front. I set it in place and scribed the stove and sink holes from underneath. Then cut them out with a 4 1/2" grinder. Really pretty easy to make. Very durable and great for cooking. In addition to the screws holding it, it has lines of silicone underneath on about 2" centers. The sink and stove dropped right back in with no plumbing mods. No more concern about damaging the fiberglass counter and it cleans right up with a damp sponge.
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Old 05-13-2020, 11:10 AM   #17
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I wouldn't cut on it, unless you hate your knives.
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Old 05-14-2020, 07:51 AM   #18
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Basically, I wouldn’t cut directly on any countertop. That’s what they make cutting boards/mats for. A butcher block countertop is supposed to look good like a stainless and the best way to maintain looks is protection. But it’s for that reason that we went stainless. Accidents do happen like the hot pot on the real wood countertop=burn ring. Stainless is a lot more forgiving to abuse and buffs up beautifully with a good clean with food safe pot cleaners.
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Old 05-20-2020, 10:55 AM   #19
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I've used a wooden cutting board as a countertop in a van. Learned pretty quick that expansion/contraction destroys it if it is attached along the endgrain side.
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Old 05-20-2020, 11:07 AM   #20
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Two things
1 - Correct you have to let the wood "breathe" and not pull apart when it changes.
2 - My wife does not use her knives on the counter top, but she could and a light buffing would clean it up.
C - Butcher block (real butcher block) should not the epoxied, but rather finished with mineral oil (many many times) and you can cut on it and damage it very little bit and new data says it is more sanitary than plastic. There will be marks and scratches and they become part of the patina of the counter.
D - All of the above does not mean that SWMBO cuts on any counter top in lieu of that plastic cutting board!
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